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G.E. Pedestal fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sun Oct 25th, 2009 01:16 am
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Joe Dobson
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I was at an auction today with the intentions of buying only one thing, a nice bench vise, and leaving. Bought the one thing and, sadly for my checking account, these two fans, and some "Don't spit on the Sidewalk" bricks!

  Here are some photo slideshows of the fans:

http://s45.photobucket.com/albums/f95/leoncrooks/GE%20Pedestal%20fan/?albumview=slideshow

 

http://s45.photobucket.com/albums/f95/leoncrooks/Emerson%20Junior/?albumview=slideshow

  I plugged the Emerson in and it runs, with evidently multiple speeds. The pushbutton switch is sticky and I sprayed electric contact cleaner down inside it and freed it up a bit.  The base is interesting looking- I, myself, have never seen one. Oscillates good.

  Not sure if I want to try the pedestal fan.  The wire from the plug looks to have been coiled in that position forever and may be kinda brittle. The blades don't spin freely- the bushings need lubed. The blades are in great shape and are all brass. The cage is brass, not bent in any way. The badge is brass in excellent shape.

  Robbins and Myers motor. Missing one of the shoulder bolts on the side of the mount. I put in a bolt temporarily to support the motor. The motor bolts have small brass acorn nuts all around.

Plate info:

Robbins and Myers A.C. Fan Motor

111 to 120 Volt

Style R-134033   (plate is a little rough in the S/N area and not sure if the last number is a 3 or is actually there or not.  Serial Number 360166

Patented Oct. 9, '06

  You can see the picture of the oilers. I am unfamiliar with those things and tried to unscrew them (counter clockwise) by hand, but they didn't budge, but I don't really know if they are supposed to unscrew or what.

  The base and pedestal are about 3 foot tall overall. There is a thick steel plate held to the base with bolts. The 3 speed switch will move back and forth, but it feels rough. The pedestal is in fine shape, but I think a bit rusty.

 

 These things have been setting in a house completely full of stuff. This guy collected everything, from dolls, toys, tools, fishing gear, cast iron skillets, baseball cards, old cowboy boots (a pickup trailer full), carnival glass, silverware, you absolutely name it and he had lots of it.... and these two fans. Had a 16' gooseneck trailer stacked with dolls a foot deep to give you an idea of the scope of his hoarding! Fifth all day auction in as many weeks. I don't know where he kept all this crap is such a small house and one outbuilding. He died at 80 years old and hard telling how long the fans have been out of use.

  Anyone got any interesting information on either fan? I may put them in the "for sale" section here later, I just wanted to show them off, first.


P.S. - If you are unfamiliar with the bricks I wrote of, here is a picture of one. Used to be scattered in every sidewalk in town here, but collectors snapped them all up. This old guy had 21 of them. Now I have them!





 

  

 

 


Last edited on Wed Oct 28th, 2009 03:27 am by

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 Posted: Sun Oct 25th, 2009 01:40 am
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Steve Stephens
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Hi Joe,
You must have plugged in your pedestal fan as I see your house (avitar) is in flames. Hope you got out all right.

The Emerson Jr. is an interesting design; always liked the cage and badge combo. Can't tell you much about it though.

The pedestal fan is a "frankenfan" made up of a R&M motor and blade together with a GE cage from the early teens mated to a fan pedestal of some type most likely from the 1930s when pedestal fans became popular. Maybe someone else can tell you what the pedestal came from.

The oilers should unscrew CCW but can get pretty stuck from sitting all these years. I've used pliers to unscrew them but you have to put something between pliers and oilers or you'll mess up the oilers. Leather? I cut a piece from an aluminum can and fold it over to protect the oiler. Some heat should help it to break loose. You'll want to replace or, at the least, clean the old felt wicks well, get out the old oil (probably congealed into grease) in the cups and replace with clean 20 wt. non-detergent oil.

The bearings are probable worn on the fan motor as the rear motor plate has been turned 90 degrees. Oilers should be at the bottom. Motor is prior to about 1911.

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 Posted: Sun Oct 25th, 2009 01:48 am
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Zachary Yarnes
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I just have to say, if I saw when of those bricks on the walkway I'd practically HAVE to spit on it

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 Posted: Sun Oct 25th, 2009 02:12 am
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Erich Martin
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Franken fan or not, I like it alot!!, well done.

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 Posted: Sun Oct 25th, 2009 05:41 pm
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Steve Sherwood
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I like the pedestal fan. Franken Yes, but cool!!!!!

Steve Sherwood

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 01:02 am
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Joe Dobson
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What exactly is making this the frankenfan?

  The motor or the cage?

The motor fits right in the cradle,  the cradle fits right into the pedestal, and the pedestal fits right into the base.

  Absolutely no way that GE would use someone elses' electric motor on a piece of their equipment is the consensus?

So either the motor is foreign to the whole assembly, or the cage is.

If you could, show me a R&M fan using that motor, and if possible show me a GE pedestal fan.

 

 

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:06 am
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Joe Dobson
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Took the motor apart as far as I could tonite.  Right off the bat, I can't grasp how the centrifugal switch is supposed to operate and how to reinstall the rotor and get the fingers back in place.

 I also gather that the stator has to be forced out to repair the "head wire". There are 4 wires coming out the hole, and they were made into two pairs and taped together with friction tape, no solder. I think there may have been problems with this thing back about when Moby Dick was a guppy and they tried to run around the start switch/start windings.

 More questions later - Here are some pictures.



 
I gather that the red line points at what is NOT a joint in the motor body!





  The zip tie is resting in the slot in that assembly. The big

end rests at where the wires connect to it. What do you call that

particular part- that the end of the zip tie is on?






 Tail end of the rotor






 Centrifugal switch. Is that the right term for this assembly?  The springs are a nonferrous material,

and one of them was stretched and wouldn't retract its' finger

I think I got that remedied






 
Sideways view of the rotor, showing the centri. switch







Centrifugal switch














 


Last edited on Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:09 am by

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:34 am
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Duane Burright
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Joe Dobson wrote: What exactly is making this the frankenfan?

  The motor or the cage?

The motor fits right in the cradle,  the cradle fits right into the pedestal, and the pedestal fits right into the base.

  Absolutely no way that GE would use someone elses' electric motor on a piece of their equipment is the consensus?

So either the motor is foreign to the whole assembly, or the cage is.

If you could, show me a R&M fan using that motor, and if possible show me a GE pedestal fan.

Pretty much the whole thing I think. On the motor, yes it is correct that GE would not use an R & M motor on their fans since GE made motors themselves.

As to the rest, I don't think they just made pedestal fans with that early style blade and cage. The earliest GE oscillators I know of are the Quiet Blade fans of the 1930's (when pedestal fans became popular), and those are a rather modern looking design with a "streamlined" look.

Here's a video of a GE Quiet Blade ped - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0SpxBhEUac .

That being said, I'll join the chorus of others who think that Franken-Ped is cool. I'd say that it'd look good fixed up. I'm sure someone here can come up with an example of that motor in use on an R & M fan.

Last edited on Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:35 am by Duane Burright

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:51 am
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Steve Stephens
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Joe Dobson wrote:
What exactly is making this the frankenfan?
It's the fact that the parts of your fan are parts from many different fans and makes.

Start with a R&M motor (probably if the tag hasn't been changed) that was made by Westinghouse for R&M (that's not a frankenfan part since it's factory).
Add a trunnion that could be from an R&M or Westinghouse or one of several other Westinghouse made fan motors and it looks like a very early one to me.
The blade looks correct as far as I know to go with the motor. Edit: As Jay points out two posts below the blade is from a later R&M that turns clockwise on not CCW as this motor was made to turn. He's right.
The cage started life on a GE fan from the teens most likely.
The pedestal base was from some fan I think as it has a speed control in the base. What fan I don't know but probably from the 30s or 40s when pedestal fans started to be made. R&M, GE, Westinghouse; none made pedestal fans till the 30s and everything plugged into the pedestal is pre-1920 unless the blade could be later R&M.

How did this fan happen? Could have been a motor shop, a fixit shop, etc. that had all those parts lying around and decided to put together a pedestal fan that worked. It ended up to be a nice looking fan.

I don't know what the Style No. R-133 3 is. My Westy motored R&M tank fans have very different style nos.

Last edited on Mon Oct 26th, 2009 04:52 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 02:46 pm
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Fred Berry
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Took the motor apart as far as I could tonite. Right off the bat, I can't grasp how the centrifugal switch is supposed to operate and how to reinstall the rotor and get the fingers back in place.

You will notice that the stationary element of the centrifugal switch is tapered. When you re-install the rotor, gently turn it as you push it in and the three centrifugal points will simply slide back onto the stationary element. It seems that most fan models with this type of centrifugal switch had the taper for ease of re-installing the rotor.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 03:01 pm
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Jay Bernard
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I've got a pretty good theory on this. The fan started life out as a 16" westy-made R&M-badged Tank.  Now... someone made the pole to go from the fan's original neck up to the yoke assy.. that would be easy to fabricate. The guard is off of a teens era GE fan. Now.. has anyone else noticed the blade is made to spin CW? Westy tanks, no matter what badge they carried spun CCW. Yes it is an R&M blade.. but not from that fan. it's either off of a 1411 R&M tank or a another stamped steel model. The Rebadged Westy tanks also all had Westinghouse blades.  So... to recap, the base, motor, yoke i think are all parts from the original 16" Tank, whilst the cage and blade are off of 2 other different fans, and the pole is home made.    Do I think it would look good left as is with the proper blade and guard? YES!

Joe, if you could get some closeups of the base and where the pole attaches to it, that would answer some questions.

PS, The stator should drop out easily with the piece of pvc pipe method.. just make sure you unscrew the Centrifugal switch contactor (the round brass thing that the fingers ride on). As far as the 4 headwires, it should have 2, so get that stator popped out and snap some pics of it so we can help!

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:09 pm
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Tim Tomerlin
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I think the previous owners didn't know what they were doing and spliced the start leads and the run leads together as I don't see any wires attached to the brass collar. Also, I think the stator was rewound at some point as every tank-motor stator I've seen had a thick coat of winding varnish over the stator and wasn't copper in color. 2c.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 26th, 2009 05:35 pm
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Jay Bernard
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Glad I wasnt the only one who thought that Tim.. I agree that the stator looks like it was rewound. Soon as he drops the stator out of that puppy, all will be told! :up:

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 Posted: Tue Oct 27th, 2009 01:16 am
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Joe Dobson
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PHOTOS:


The base and tube connection is seamless. Not threaded.
All the way up to where the cradle fits.


The blade would spin CW facing it.




Cradle, showing setscrew to hold it to the pin protruding

up thru it.


Top of the pedestal, showing the cradle

Inside front cover.



Stator, showing brass switch assembly and the wiring




Better shot of the wires out of the stator. Two must be

the start winding, and the RUN are the other two.



Centrifugal switch shot, and the split brass ring assembly

to the left.


again- a good shot




If someone rewound this, they did it a long time ago.





Shows a lot of detail


Not enough detail for the motor plate.







Shot of the control switch up thru the bottom of the base.


Thumbscrew on cradle



Top of the pedestal, and showing where the wire exits.




 The shot of the base. Seamless joint between it and pedestal.

The stator dropped right out. No drilling or pressing or heat. Had a metal ring the right diameter and 4 or 5 jolts down on a tabletop and it slid right out.

  4 leads off the stator. The split brass ring does have 2 wires coming off of it. One goes to the stator, and the other went out the back of the housing to the power lead.

  What should be connected to what when I put it back together. Power and neutral coming up from the switch, then what?

Last edited on Tue Oct 27th, 2009 01:24 am by

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 Posted: Tue Oct 27th, 2009 01:52 am
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Tim Tomerlin
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I'm positive that the motor was rewound, and in a strange way at that. I think I see what they did with the starting windings, they just set it up a different way.  I would try it out wired the way it was when you received it. 2c.

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 Posted: Tue Oct 27th, 2009 04:50 am
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Joe Dobson
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At startup, are the start windings in parrellel with the run windings and as the motor winds up,  the centrifugal force causes the fingers to lift of the brass hub and break the flow of current to the start windings and take them out of the circuit and cause the motor to continue to operate on the "run" windings only?

  That seems like what I see.

 At rest, the fingers on the cent. switch are making contact with the halves of the brass hub and complete the circuit for the start windings.

 That is not the original intent? It does seem odd that 4 wires come out the case to connect to the line in the manner that they did.

 Could be that way back when, the headwire got torn or cut and they cobbled together a repair to get it back up and running.

  What I would say, though, is that this wasn't a recent attempt to conjure up an antique looking fan to trick the fan collecting public. The old guy who had this didn't sell anything. He just bought. I talked to his sons at the sale and they told me that all he did was go to rummage sales in our city, no auctions, and had been doing that since they were little (the youngest of them is 50). He was always first one there!

 If the fan wasn't a family hand-me-down, he got it at a rummage sale here in town in the last who knows how many years.

  Anyway, as long as this thing has been setting collecting grease and dust I suggest that this is what happened: I bet the fan possibly fell over and smashed the cage and blades, so the owner could have had a fixit guy scrounge up what is on there now to get it back up and running. That sounds like the likely scenario.

 

  I guess I will set down and draw this wiring out and see what I can make of it.

 

Last edited on Tue Oct 27th, 2009 04:52 am by

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 Posted: Tue Oct 27th, 2009 06:48 am
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Jay Bernard
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Ok... Definately another Hiccup in my theory.. The switch and base look like they came off of a GE BMY... and I wasnt expecting that smooth joint between the base and pole.. I bet if you strip the paint off of the base, you'll see a really nice brazing job there.. should look like a brass colored weld..

As far as the base, I'm gonna make a bet that the Cage was off of a GE BMY, and the base and switch were off of the same fan.

The stator DEFINATELY appears to have been rewound... now the funky wiring coming out of the motor? no clue.. maybe it was rewound to work with the starting circuit in the bmy switch? Unless the switch was out of an EARLY BMY with the centrifugal switch.. This is something we'd need one of our motor guys to sort out... Mc Comas??? HELP!!

 

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 Posted: Tue Oct 27th, 2009 08:42 pm
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Tim Tomerlin
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At startup, are the start windings in parrellel with the run windings and as the motor winds up, the centrifugal force causes the fingers to lift of the brass hub and break the flow of current to the start windings and take them out of the circuit and cause the motor to continue to operate on the "run" windings only?This is correct, the thing that's different is that the wire connections you are questioning are outside the windings while originally they would have been buried inside the windings and in a different order. This is why I think it was re-wound. It should work fine if you keep it wired the way it was. 

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 03:38 am
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Joe Dobson
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Great! I can repair it to work like that, no problem.

I brought the motor plate in the house to look at it with a magnifying glass. I edited my original post to reflect what I read there. The style number looks to read R-134033, but the last number is a little iffy as to whether it is there for sure or not. Is that the right number of digits?

  A friend of mine has a lollypop fan he got from an old man hereabouts. I was out to his house and looked at it today. It has an R&M motor on it. I need to get his motors' style number. The motors looked pretty much similar but I think the ventilation holes may be a different shape. It sets on the dresser in his bedroom. He plugged it in and ran it for a bit to demonstrate how it works for me.

  Got to looking, heck he even has some pancake motor'd fans..... He's been holding out on me  :shock:. He has a wide variety of tastes in collecting.

  He did tell me he'd give me my money back on this fan I have when I get it all put back together and don't even think about repainting it..... I think all you guys do great work on the refinishing that this one would benefit from the same treatment, but he doesn't think so.

  While I have you here, explain what you guys mean by a "tank" style motor and what is "BMY"?  I haven't read enough of the right posts to figure it out.

  Is this motor on my particular fan made by Westinghouse?

 

 

Last edited on Wed Oct 28th, 2009 03:54 am by

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 03:43 am
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Steve Stephens
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Joe Dobson wrote:
Is this motor on my particular fan made by Westinghouse?
If motor tag says LIST it's a R&M motor. If it says STYLE it's a Westinghouse motor. Does your tag say "made by the owners of patent..."?
That would be a Westinghouse motor.
There's a chance that R&M may have made some of the Style No. motors under license by Westinghouse but if the tag says "made by the owners of patent" I would go by that. Westinghouse had those patents.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 03:53 am
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Joe Dobson
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Steve Stephens wrote:    If it says STYLE it's a Westinghouse motor. Does your tag say "made by the owners of patent..."?
That would be a Westinghouse motor.
There's a chance that R&M may have made some of the Style No. motors under license by Westinghouse but if the tag says "made by the owners of patent" I would go by that. Westinghouse had those patents.


  It says Style. No mention of patents

  Also says "Made in Springfield, Ohio".

  In the bottom left hand corner of the tag in small letters are the numbers 1132 (or 132) and in even smaller type to the right of that, in parentheses, is (1-6-11)

 

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 04:34 am
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Steve Stephens
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Joe Dobson wrote:
Also says "Made in Springfield, Ohio".

  In the bottom left hand corner of the tag in small letters are the numbers 1132 (or 132) and in even smaller type to the right of that, in parentheses, is (1-6-11)


Joe, can you post a photo of your motor badge?

Here are two badges from R&M tank motors. As you can see the earlier one says "made by owners of patent". Is the later one just like yours or does your actually say "made in Springfield, Ohio". Or does it just say "Springfield, Ohio"?

Attached Image (viewed 1855 times):

R&M Westytankbadge.jpg

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 04:34 am
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Steve Stephens
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Later badge with 1-6-11 "micro date" on tag. This tag does not tell who made the motor as does the earlier tag but I think it was made by Westinghouse since it has a STYLE No. instead of the typical R&M LIST No..

Attached Image (viewed 1779 times):

R&M 12

Last edited on Wed Oct 28th, 2009 04:37 am by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 12:36 pm
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Joe Dobson
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It is like the latter badge.....

I can't remember from one day to the next how to set my camera to take closeup pictures, so for right now no closeups of the badge.


So, to enlighten me, what does BMY stand for and what exactly does "tank motor" designate?

 

Last edited on Wed Oct 28th, 2009 12:37 pm by

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 01:08 pm
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Doug Handley
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BMY = BIG MOTOR YOKE, a non oscillator GE fan.  Tank motor refers to the cast iron type of motor you have, as opposed to the later stamped steel motors.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 05:33 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Or, to add to what Doug said; GE made both large sized motors and smaller sized motors that were carried in a trunnion. BMY 1908 through 1912 (13 for 16") and Small Motor Yoke (SMY) from 1913 to (I'd have to look it up but a few years anyway until the yoke mount went away). When seeing them side by side it's easy to tell the difference. When viewing in photos it can be very hard unless you know certain features to look for.

Usually collectors refer to the Westinghouse cast iron motors from c.1905 through 1911 as a "tank" because it's made heavy, made tough, you know...like a tank. Other similar fans such as the R&M 1404 might also be called a tank motor.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 05:56 pm
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Joe Dobson
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OK, this is a BMY plus a tank motor. The motor housing is about 6 inches in diameter where the yoke bolts to it, and the yoke is about six and a quarter between.

 That helps burn thru the fog of not knowing all the shorthand for all the descriptions I read here.

 

 

Last edited on Wed Oct 28th, 2009 05:57 pm by

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 Posted: Wed Oct 28th, 2009 06:23 pm
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Steve Stephens
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I would call the motor an 'R&M Westinghouse Tank". No BMY there unless the cage came from one. A BMY is ONLY a GE fan with big motor in a yoke. It's all collector's jargon which you will pick up in time.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 04:18 am
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Joe Dobson
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  Well, I've finished working on the other junk I've had in line ahead of this fan, and set down and started doing some work on this fan.

  I cut the existing wires off the stator and soldered some new leads on. When I left to go eat supper, I had it in my head which 2 wires were the run and which 2 were the start windings. Came back from eating and have forgot which was which.

  I hate it when that happens. Trusty digital ohm-meter gives these readings for the  coils. On the 200 ohm scale~one reads 28 ohms and the other reads 21 ohms.

  Which is which, do you think?  Is the higher (28) reading the start winding beings it is a finer gauge wire?

  When I get that solved, my next quest will be to come up with something to use as a felt substitute shaft seal there in the ends of the motor shaft bushing areas. What is in those slots now is the consistency of mud. Maybe use felt?

 

 

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 04:40 am
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Steve Stephens
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Joe Dobson wrote:
 

  When I get that solved, my next quest will be to come up with something to use as a felt substitute shaft seal there in the ends of the motor shaft bushing areas. What is in those slots now is the consistency of mud. Maybe use felt?


Joe, can you put up a photo showing the area where you want to put the felt seals? Nothing like that was used I don't think but I'm not sure of what you are talking about.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 04:55 am
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Joe Dobson
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Not able to take a good pix.

Down in where the shaft goes into the housings- either end- and there is a circular recess that I can scrape greasy gunk out of. It is inboard of the bushings, so I thought it was a place for a "seal", a felt wiper,  to keep oil out of the interior of the motor.  You can see the brass bushing in that pix, and the wider diameter part of that hole has a circular slot around its' circumference that I thought may have had a wiper in it cause it is full of oily gunk- I thought it was the remains of a felt wiper.

  What keeps oil from migrating up into the motor, if not that? 

  !!!! OR- I just had a brain storm (or anuerism) is that just a place for the oil that is wicked up onto the shaft to drop off the shaft and collect there before running back down into the oilers?  

  Anyway, any guesses on the wiring resistance telling me which coil is the start winding?


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fan assembly 001.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 7th, 2009 05:08 am by

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 05:13 am
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Dave Dalsin
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You got it right! there is a drain hole in  the bottom of that groove also in the other three grooves.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 05:36 pm
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Joe Dobson
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Well, glad I got that part solved!

Now, how about them windings?

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 Posted: Sat Nov 7th, 2009 09:48 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Yes, what your brainstorm was about and what Dave said; drain holes. When I cleaned out my Westy tank there was a lot of gunk in the groove. Clean is well and make sure the hole is open. Don't put any felt in there though I wonder if that would actually help. I don't think oil is SUPPOSED to circulate from wick to shaft, back to the groove and into the oil cups but, if there is any overoiling, the excess should drain back to the oiler and not get spun off into outer space (your walls and ceiling). GE pancakes also have a mechanism to return excess oil to the cup. What other fans do that I don't know.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 02:39 am
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Joe Dobson
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I've learned that low resistance equals run windings, and high resistance equal start windings. Fewer wraps of coarse wire versus more wraps of fine wire. I am soldering things back as such and hopefull I can get it all back in operation in the near future.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 13th, 2009 11:43 pm
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Joe Dobson
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  Got the motor put together this afternoon after soldering the leads in. Some of the soldered joints are a little long and stiff and didn't fit like I'd like, but the stator went down in the housing and I got the start switch housing screwed down easy enough.

  I put the rear motor bell on and tightened up the nuts that hold it and put a few drops of oil in each bearing cavity.

  Plugged it in and.........HOUSTON~ WE HAVE ROTATION!!!!

   It runs silently and the start winding switch works like it is supposed to. I don't have the blade on it yet to put a load on it. I just connected it to 110 via some alligator clips to see if my wiring experiment was successful, and it was.

  The guy who wants to buy it supplied me with some vintage wire he likes the looks of. It is black, with a white stripe, cloth covered twin lead with what looks like asbestos under the cover and surrounding the wire itself. I still have my moms old electric waffle iron and it has this type and style of wiring!

  Looking at the pictures of you guys' restores, I think some of that twisted twin lead stuff would have been better. But, he likes this stuff, so this is what we are gonna use.

 

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 Posted: Tue Nov 17th, 2009 04:23 am
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Joe Dobson
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Put everything together tonite. The speed control is in great shape. I strung some wire through the pedestal and got the motor wired to the control and plugged it in.

 As predicted earlier, the blade isn't for this motor. Wrong rotation. Air blows to the rear.

  I cleaned out the oil cups and soaked the felt wicks in kerosene for a couple of hours. I put some oil back in the cups and put them back on the motor.

  Plugged it in and it took right off, and all three speeds work.

 Since the blade isn't right in its current orientation,  I wonder what the chances of finding a set that would work on it?

Last edited on Tue Nov 17th, 2009 04:23 am by

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