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Missing Link Found in Saint Louis  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 11:00 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Talk about a thrill---even @ 83.  Yesterday I was able to buy locally one of the known but never seen (by me) variations of the Meston!  I know there are those who do not believe things exist if they don't see a picture, but I am of the old school and if I can see it, hear and smell it run, feel it in my hands, I believe it exists.  No, I don't taste them---not even a Meston!  I just might send it to Fan-Fair to show the "Doubting Thomas's".
 
First it came with a steel wire clothes hanger used as a carrying handle, which was scratching the name tag and paint.  I removed that instantly.  Sorry, no picture, but I saved and will keep them together. 
 
It has been very well used as is obvious by the bearing (bronze end caps) wear. The owner solved that, at least for about 105 years by using fine braided copper wire and filling the space between the shaft and the end caps.
 
Another first to me is the blade.  It is 4 wing, 12" Parker, nickel plated and has a hub with a round nose through which the shaft protrudes. Obviously a late Meston, probably 1900 (the wrong earlier, M1 & M2 models are still listed in the 1898 catalog).
 
Next is the cage, again one I have never seen before.  It is brass, 8 wire, crossing in the center, but has a unique rear. There is a cast adapter (about 6' diam.) to be able to mount the 8 wires onto the 3 mounting holes on the front of all Mestons.   I feel sure it is factory and the wires are wrapped clockwise with Emerson shortened machine screws with large diameter heads, as used on the desk and ceiling fans.
 
Those are the differences I find immediately on my new F I 1, 60 cycles, 7200 Alts. Per. Min., 104 volt 4th? model Meston with the hanging switch (first used on '94 Meston)  No. 878.  Last patent is Sept. 18 '94. 
 
Can hardly wait to get to all of my Emerson catalogs of that era to identify this better, although the old timers descendants of the original illustrators do tell me Emerson often used old cuts to save money. This makes a problem for those who put all of their wrong opinions on pictures and various non-factory articles, not reality.
 
I'm leaving it as found for now.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 11:43 am
   
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Dan Hilton
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Great story!

Can't wait to see it in person or pictures posted here.

If you need a transporter to get it to FF to show it off I can oblige.

 

Look forward to hearing the story of how you tracked it down too.

 

........Dan H.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 11:54 am
   
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Kim Frank
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Congratulations Emerson Bill......or is it Meston Emerson Bill now. I love to hear these kinds of stories.....that jaded old collectors can still be thrilled by something other than a regular bowel movement.....Most excellent find......You should come to Indy to show it off.....and bring the Gemerson too.....

Last edited on Tue Jul 1st, 2014 06:31 pm by Kim Frank

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 12:16 pm
   
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Steven P Dempsey
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Pictures Please!!

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 01:04 pm
   
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Gary Buchanan
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Congradulations Bill love to hear stories like that. Great find!

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 04:37 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hey Kim,
Thanks for the kind words and medical advice.  Glad you appreciate the new find.  I was thinking about you when I was finishing am Emmy and was doing the final fitting.  Of course that is done, running, with the front cover off, to make it easy and precise.  How do you do that with all of those two bearing off brands that you deal with?
 
I have kept about a dozen Meston and Emerson tripods and of course am still hoping to find Meston models 2001 (1891) & 2002 (1892). Maybe I will send the new one and that half-good GEmerson, to Fan-Fair, except I remember last year.
 
Just plain, Emerson Bill

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 06:40 pm
   
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Kim Frank
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You just send those two fans over to Indy and I'll put them in my display area... I'll make sure that nobody tries to straighten the cages on them. Better yet, leave your sweet young bride at home, catch a ride over to FF, and you, Jon Brown, and myself will go out a hit some bars during the dull times.....

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 Posted: Tue Jul 1st, 2014 10:36 pm
   
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Mark Behrend
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Congrats Bill, I'm going to try to swing by some time this week. I could take some pictures for you and post them.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 12:03 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Sounds great. I'm disassembling and cleaning it and discovered the cage is also nickel plated and the adapter to Meston has a casting number and resembles the three piece normal Meston struts. Separately they will photograph better and mean a lot more than when assembled, including the unique blade. I have Parker blades with Pat. Applied for and Patent Pending but this has the usual stamping.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 01:15 am
   
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Bill Arfmann
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Just plain, Emerson Bill-- Let us add our congratulations from the prairies of Nebraska!
We can't wait to hear the story!!!

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 Posted: Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 11:21 am
   
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Ron Jeter
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Bill: That's a great find and will be added to the AFCA Emerson Survey and Thanks for all the info. This one does have the brass guard and will be noted on the survey! Thanks again.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 2nd, 2014 06:04 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Ron,
After checking with all the people I know who have Mestons I feel sure you can change the survey list as we discussed. Emerson obviously started new numbers for the '94 model. Ignoring the first two models with the 11" blades of 1891 & 1892, I reviewed the early catalogs--'92 (first), '93, '94, '95, '96, '97, & '98, '99, and concluded:
 
The 12" open and closed guards were available from '92 on;
 
The open center knock down cage was introduced in '96 for both 12" & 16" Mestons. The 12" had 3 flat struts. The 16" Type M. 2. appears to be the first use of the adapter ring. The outer 8 holes match the spacing of the Emerson tripods which arrived in the '97 catalog. From then on any Emerson tripod cage could be used on the Mestons (with the adapter ring--12" or 16");  
 
The '97 pattern guard has the cross wire centers and at that time they offered six guards ranging in price from $1.25 to $5.00, brass, polished brass or nickel;
 
By '98 eight guards were available with the addition of the 1898 pattern in both 12" & 16";
 
In 1899 they introduced the hollow shaft motor and the Parker blade and no longer listed the Mestons.
 
The only explanation I can come up with for my combination of blade and cage on a Meston is that it was awarded to someone that way. Emerson throughout there history frequently did this. Old employees often give that detail when visiting with them.
 
Hope this isn't too confusing and is probably of interest to very few.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 12:19 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill, I am hoping you or someone will post some photos of your new find.  

What exactly makes an Emerson a "Meston"?   How can one be certain that an Emerson is a Meston and not another model of a tripod?

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 03:40 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Steve,All fans made by the Emerson Co. from 1890 to 1895 are Mestons and prominently marked as such. I've never seen a round based Meston made from 1890 through 1892. From 1893 through 1897 the name Meston is cast in the bronze end caps. The Emerson tripods were introduced in 1896 and the end plates are marked Emerson---not Meston. They were both sold at that time, through 1897 when they dropped the Meston.  Both were made with the large hanging switch on the back before they switched to porcelain. Hope this helps.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 05:02 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill, I came to fan collecting a little later than some of you and learning the names that collectors have put to certain fans isn't always easy.   I have based this post on copies of the 1896 and 1898 Emerson catalogs which is all I have to read and look over.

A friend and I have discussed exactly what a "Meston" is and have come to the same conclusion at the end of this post.    I'm interested to see if you agree or not.

1896 Emerson catalog of Alternating Current Motors for Fan and Power Purposes, sent to me by Steve Cunningham in .pdf format-

Page 4:  Our "Old Reliable" The "Meston" Alternating Current Fan Motor, Type M1  The fan illustrated has the switch on the top of the front giving infinitely variable speeds.

Page 6:  "Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor.   No Commutator, No Brushes

Page 7:  "Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor.   Three speeds, Without Commutator or Brushes.    New and Without a Rival.  Its General Appearance is like our Celebrated "Meston" Motor.  The fan, as illustrated, has the rear hanging switch.

Page 18:  General Directions for Our Small Alternating Current Motors.Special Directions for Fan Motors.---Our "Meston" Motors have speed regulators for any desired speed.  For full speed, place regulator thumb screw at mark on slot in front cover; reduce speed by moving toward center.
On "Emerson" Induction Motors place regulating lever so that contact is made on two studs in back cover.  To cut out current entirely, throw lever to contact with the black stud---or preferably throw regular switch.

1898 Fan Motor Catalog Index:
   Desk Fan Motors, 1897 Model.  
    "Emerson Electric" Induction Types EI1, EI2, FI1, FI2
    "Meston"  Brush and Commutator  Types M.1, M.2

   Desk Fan Motors, 1898 Model.
     "Emerson Electric" Induction  Types EI1, EI2, FI1, FI2

Page 11:  1897 Model Induction Desk Fans.  Eternal Appearance and General Construction.---In external appearance our 1897 models of Induction Motors will present the same general design as our "Meston" Motors, which have become known in almost every part of the world where the alternating current is used.

Pages 14-17 show various 1897 style "Emerson Electric" Induction fan, no commutators, no brushes.  These fans have a start position and two running speeds.

Pages 18-19 show Our Old Reliable "Meston" Motor.  Carbon Brushes.  Tempered Copper Commutator.  Best brush and commutator Motor ever made.  Any speed; can be regulated to any speed with corresponding reduction in current.

Pages 24-29 show "Our New....1898 Model Alternating Fan Motor"
These 1898 models would be the new "tripod" as we collectors generally know them and were made, I believe, through the 1901 model year in the same Type designations.

And here is my point in making this post:
1.  I believe that Emerson considered their "Meston Motor" to be only the top switch, variable speed, commutator, and brush motor model with the bronze end bells.  Several times the catalogs state "Our old Reliable Meston Motor".  Nothing to that effect is said about the newer Induction Motors with the back switch.

2.   I think the later models with bronze end bells and the hanging back switch was known by Emerson as their "Emerson Electric Induction Motor".  This name would also extend to the 1897 models of which some or all do not have the bronze end bells but appear to be silver painted cast iron.  The catalogs are not clear on this point.

I do realize that some of the later "induction" motors may have MESTON cast into the end bells but, in spite of that, I think that Emerson still considered their Meston Motors to be only the bronze end bell commutator and brush motors with infinitely variable speeds. 

Up until Fanfair last year when I finally had the chance to look over a number of "Mestons" I always thought any bronze end bell Emerson was a "Meston".  I have since, after carefully reading the 1896 and 1898 Emerson catalogs, changed my views on what a "Meston" is and am certain that Emerson, themselves, considered the commutator and brush model to be the only "Meston" and their statements in their catalogs seem to bear that out.   What are your thoughts?

Below is Geoff's Meston.  No back switch- switch is on the top front of the motor giving infinitely variable speeds.  This is a brush and commutator motor.

Attached Image (viewed 3480 times):

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 05:03 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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This is an Emerson Electric Induction fan motor, not a Meston.  Switch on rear of motor giving a start and two run positions.  There are no brushes nor commutator.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 09:26 am
   
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Stephen Chew
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:clap:Wonderful fine Bill, hope to see it soon. Steve

Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 09:27 am by Stephen Chew

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 12:10 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Steve,  Keep it simple like Emerson did.
Check the front of the second fan pictured and you will see Meston which it is.
 There are several variations as listed in the catalogs I listed above. I have all of the originals from Emerson, and didn't want to complicate things more.
 The incorrect cuts in some literature like the 1898 catalog (page 21 for example) don't help either.
 Adding to the confusion are the use of terms like "Series and Class" in the Mestons and No. (not Serial No.), and they are not sequential. There are 8 pages on Alternating Current Motors in the first (1892) catalog alone, with No.s 2001, 2002 (fans), 2005, 2006, 2015, 2016, 2020, 2021, 2025 and 2026 all pictured and described.
 You mentioned the M1. and the M2. but not the Series A and AA which are earlier and have higher No.s than the later FI1 and EI1 and other Mestons.
 In fact the 1893 catalog (which includes the ALTERNATING CURRENT REVOLVING MOTOR on page 8, and the ALTERNATING CURRENT SLOW SPEED MOTORS---with two Meston motors on page 13) is titled MESTON ALTERNATING MOTORS since that is all they made then. 
I'm wondering if we'll ever convince you and your friend.  I'm about to give up!

Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 12:13 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 02:38 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Don't give up Bill.  I have tried to keep things simple (in a long post) but concentrating only on what a "Meston" really is and my conclusion is what I am sticking with.  To me it is very plain and simple that a Meston, as stated in two Emerson catalogs (1896 and 98) are brush and commutator motors.  I can't and didn't try to explain why some Emerson Induction motors may have MESTON cast into the covers.  I know the catalogs may be open to interpretation and I have done my best to look at statements in the catalogs objectively. To call a back switch Emerson made before the 1898 models a "Meston" is contradictory to what the catalogs state.  I do not have access to the wonderful factory information you have Bill and, perhaps, there is some information in catalogs that I have not seen that would show me that I am wrong.  I know little about Meston fans but I do know what Emerson said in their catalogs on what a "Meston" is and what an "Emerson Electric Induction" motor is and the fact that both types are separated into different Types or names with distinctly different construction and features in Emerson catalogs.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 08:53 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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I'll try one more time Steve.
 
Emerson Electric Mfg Co. as all other fan companies marked what they made. Mestons are marked Meston and Emersons are marked Emerson. It can't be simpler!
 
I think your confusion can be explained with more detail. The 1893 model brush and commutator Meston motor is described thoroughly and technically on pages 5 & 6 of the 1893 catalog. The pictures all show the top switch for the 1893 model.
 
My 1894 catalog is mismarked and the 1895 catalogs show both the 1893 Type M.1. Meston and the 1894 Type E.I.1. Meston with the hanging switch on page 36. Still no Emerson fan was made at that time. Page 37 is interesting; "SPECIAL WORK---if you know exactly what you want, we will contract to manufacture. If your designs are not complete, we will work them up for you, and contract for manufacture as soon as perfected." 
 
Having access to the 1896 catalog you already know the new 16" Meston was introduced and pictured on page 5 (with the cage adapter I just found). The first "Emerson Electric" fans were introduced on pages 6, 7 and 8 as the E.I.1., F.I.1. and the F.I.2. All have the hanging switch as does the 1894 Meston without brushes and commutator.
 
The 1897 catalog has both the "Emerson Electric" Induction and the "Meston" Brush and Commutator listed and pictured on pages 8 through 14. "1897 Model Induction Desk Fans.---External Appearance and General Construction.---In external appearance our 1897 models of Induction Motors will present the same general design as our "Meston" Motors, which have become known in almost every part of the world where the alternating current is used." The hanging switch is considerably smaller and lighter (cheaper?) than those used from 1894 to 1896. Also for the 1897 model "---in place of the polished bronze covers they will be finished in aluminum finish or plain bronze and polished nickel bands around the outside---".
 
By 1898, as you know, the Meston is still listed and the 1898 model is introduced with the first porcelain switch. The switch was changed and improved each of the next few years.
 
In 1899 the Meston was no longer listed and the bracket fans were introduced. I have never seen the elongated bracket base that was used for the tripods converted to brackets. It certainly looks attractive on page 18 of the 1899 catalog. I hope someone has one and will share it with us. The first circular bracket base was 1901. 
 
 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 08:59 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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The basic thing I did NOT make clear is the 1894 model Mestons are not brush and commutator and DO have the large hanging switch. I can't explain more. Maybe some of the electrical engineers or "wizards" can help me there.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 09:18 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill, I read the 1896 Emerson catalog very carefully and found what I have posted in my post yesterday:
Page 4:  Our "Old Reliable" The "Meston" Alternating Current Fan Motor, Type M1 (The fan illustrated has the switch on the top of the front giving infinitely variable speeds).

Page 6:  "Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor.   No Commutator, No Brushes

Page 7:  "Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor.   Three speeds, Without Commutator or Brushes.    New and Without a Rival.  Its General Appearance is like our Celebrated "Meston" Motor.  The fan, as illustrated, has the rear hanging switch.

NOTHING is mentioned of the hanging switch models or any EI or FI Type being a "Meston" and everything I can find in the 1896 and 1898 Emerson catalogs says or indicates that the "Meston" has brushes and commutator plus variable speeds.  Those features do not apply to the Emerson Induction Fan Motors types EI and FI which are the ones with the hanging switches before the 1898 model.  There seems to me to be a clear separation between the Meston and the Emerson Induction fan motors.   Does the Type EI come from "Emerson Induction"?  If you study the catalogs carefully I don't see how one could say the hanging switch models with bronze ends are Meston motors.  Those fans may be marked MESTON on the end bells but what did EMERSON refer to them as?  It says in the catalogs; "'Emerson Electric" Alternating Induction Fan Motor"
Quote from the 1896 catalog:"Our "Meston" Motors have speed regulators for any desired speed.  For full speed, place regulator thumb screw at mark on slot in front cover; reduce speed by moving toward center.On "Emerson" Induction Motors place regulating lever so that contact is made on two studs in back cover.  To cut out current entirely, throw lever to contact with the black stud---or preferably throw regular switch."

I would love to sit down with you, your catalogs, and your Mestons and hanging switch Emersons and have a nice long discussion with you until we both saw things in the same light, whatever that might turn out to be.

Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 09:20 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 10:13 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: My 1894 catalog is mismarked and the 1895 catalogs show both the 1893 Type M.1. Meston and the 1894 Type E.I.1. Meston with the hanging switch on page 36. Still no Emerson fan was made at that time.
 
 

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Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 10:20 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 10:15 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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1894.
 
http://books.google.com/books?id=cWJNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA851&dq=N.+M.+Garland+Meston++1894&hl=en&sa=X&ei=htK1U8XYCoieqAbbiYLYBw&ved=0CBwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=N.%20M.%20Garland%20Meston%20%201894&f=false

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 10:17 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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1895.
 
http://books.google.com/books?id=aTs8AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA331&lpg=PA331&dq=1895+meston+fan+motors&source=bl&ots=akrcPgvtl-&sig=Wxb5C7roP0qVLWdboqpH20rPrFU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Es-1U47zLsKDqgaCxIGwAw&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=1895%20meston%20fan%20motors&f=false

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 10:31 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill, what year are you making reference to that Emerson was not making fans?

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 11:02 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Russ,
I was referring to 1890 to 1895 when the Emerson Electric Co. made only Meston fans. The first Emerson fan was listed in the 1896 catalog. I was referring only to Emerson branded fans. They obviously made fans from 1890 until at least 1970, my last catalog

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 11:33 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Hi Russ,
They obviously made fans from 1890 until at least 1970.

1891 was the introduction and production of their first fan motor.  They established the business in late 90.  The CF image is 95

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Last edited on Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 11:33 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 3rd, 2014 11:57 pm
   
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George Durbin
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Hi Every one!
 
I for one am totally confused... When yall get it worked out, send me one!   :)
 
geo...

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 12:26 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Hi Russ,
I was referring to 1890 to 1895 when the Emerson Electric Co. made only Meston fans. The first Emerson fan was listed in the 1896 catalog. I was referring only to Emerson branded fans. They obviously made fans from 1890 until at least 1970, my last catalog
Bill, Maybe this will clear up what you mean by Emerson only making Meston fans between 1890 and 1895.

Do you mean that fans with the front plate marked MESTON as the fan below is a Meston Branded fan?

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 12:34 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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And fans such as this model with the front plate marked EMERSON AC MOTOR are the Emerson Branded fans?  Though barely visible I'm pretty sure this fan front cover is marked EMERSON and not MESTON since I can just see SON and not TON in the name.

As I see it both fans are branded Emerson since the motor tags on both fans is marked Emerson Elecrtric Mfg. Co. and, in general, the motor or data tags are the main identification on machinery.

In my lengthy post about the differences in a Meston and Emerson Induction motor I did not take into account what name, MESTON or EMERSON was cast into the front cover.  I do not have those fans at my disposal to see what they are marked.  The particular name cast in the front cover does not effect what I wrote previously.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:10 am
   
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Russ Huber
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How about you and Bill just call all those odd looking squatted tripods Mestons.  That is who designed the d amn things. Brush motor or induction, they were designed by Alex Meston. 
 
Poor Alexander Meston was 6 feet under at the age of 26 in 93 from consumption(Tuberculosis).
 
Down the road engineers like Charles Meston and Herbert Finch started designing the fans.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:31 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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Russ Huber wrote: How about you and Bill just call all those odd looking squatted tripods Mestons.  That is who designed the d amn things. Brush motor or induction, they were designed by Alex Meston. 
We could but I like to go with the factory's terminology which I think I have in my posts here.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:55 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Steve Stephens wrote: Russ Huber wrote: How about you and Bill just call all those odd looking squatted tripods Mestons.  That is who designed the d amn things. Brush motor or induction, they were designed by Alex Meston. 
We could but I like to go with the factory's terminology which I think I have in my posts here.

Let me rephrase that for you: "I could, but I like to go with the factory terminology which I think I have in my posts here."
 
Just learn how to hang loose Steveo.   Take a deep breath.....now exhale slowly...
 

 
Did you know that Alexander Meston was 24 years old when he designed this fan motor!

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:56 am
   
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:56 am
   
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 02:57 am
   
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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 03:03 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Just think of all the Edison suck up fan makers.  The Meston brothers had the foresight to follow alternating current and be bullheaded enough through all the BS to continue! They eventually had to make fans of various frequencies  and direct current to meet their customers needs. 

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 05:39 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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"Mestons and More" should be available soon. Waiting for Mark Behrend to call and come over to get some pictures to share (proving existence to some).
Should be fun with such additions as the Helvetia FAN OSCILLATOR, some Mestons, odd Westihghouse, and an Emerson chair from the year 205 according to the name plate and some people's theory which works occasionally. Will throw in a few hundred fan badges and motor nameplates.
Also a resurrected Emerson DC (23066), The GEmerson and a PI 242. I'll think of more but am dependent on Mark for his expertise. 

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 Posted: Fri Jul 4th, 2014 06:20 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: The basic thing I did NOT make clear is the 1894 model Mestons are not brush and commutator and DO have the large hanging switch.
The Electrical World, Volume 25. June 22, 1895.

 
This is a direct quote from the June 22, 1895 Emerson Electrical World article:

 
"Two "NEW" motors have been "brought out" by the Emerson Company- a ceiling fan for alternating current circuits, and an induction desk fan motor which has neither commutator or collector rings.
 

http://books.google.com/books?id=I1BEAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA735&dq=Meston+alternating+current+fan+motors+1894&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Dee2U5L7F4egqAbmkYD4Bw&ved=0CDUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Meston%20alternating%20current%20fan%20motors%201894&f=false

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Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2014 06:20 pm by Russ Huber

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