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Missing Link Found in Saint Louis  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Sun Jul 6th, 2014 10:09 pm
   
161st Post
George Durbin
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Hi everyone!
Until you gents get this all ironed out, and believe me I haven't had a bath in 2 days and on my 3rd bottle of red wine just giddy with anticipation over this! In the mean time if ya got any 19, 21, 27 or 29 series emmys for ya know $15 or $20 apiece. Let me know!   :)=

Geo...

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 12:04 am
   
162nd Post
Bill Hoehn
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John, 
I just finished a response to you and lost it in space. I'll try again.Thank you John. You described my relationship with Warren better than I could.
A little other Warren history. We often had Emerson Co. visitors at the shop--engineers, executives, salesmen and others. They came in for repairs, information, and to borrow such things as an extra CF 28 for a pattern to possibly reproduce overseas.They (Emerson) joined the AFCA, and my wife Laverne and I represented them at several early conventions. They gave us many very nice things to have auctioned for the AFCA, like shirts, sweaters, books, mugs and balloons. Warren and I added things like the old wood Emerson shipping boxes.
Warren was a very early member of the club and I joined when it was reorganized. Recently I looked at the original membership list and the THE FAN COLLECTOR'S NEWSLETTER---Vol 1, #1 By Kurt House dated Jan, Feb, Mar 1981. When I compared it with my latest directory, I found four members still listed--John Andrews, Kurt House, Sidney Lamb and David Spindor. My apologies if I missed anyone. I believe all of the original members except one were from Texas. 
As to your P. I. 241, I have some thoughts to share. Mine--both "stick" and "yoke" have the large ring --4 & 3/8" diameter. We had many 241s in the shop and quite a few were missing cages. Our usual fix was to grab a cage off of a worthless Century (Sorry Brad), remove the center tag and use it for a replacement. Of course they are smaller, but customers didn't know or care. I had forgotten how few early Emersons used the large ring until I looked at all of mine. One could not prove the next year model cage and I have never seen an original with that done. Maybe yours is the first and only. That certainly sounds impressive!

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 12:34 am
   
163rd Post
Bill Hoehn
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Nice picture of my motor in my home.  Don't know how it got in the public domain.

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 12:46 am
   
164th Post
Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Nice picture of my motor in my home.  Don't know how it got in the public domain.
http://www.afcaforum.com/forum1/32852.html
 

You posted on the post(below) making it public domain.  Your message from that post is posted below.  It would appear you did not have a problem making the pictures public domain.
 

 
Hello Steve, I'll give you some history and more detail of this and the early Emersons since I just reviewed every catalog, parts lists, patent, court ruling etc. from 1892 to 1902.
Some of my early blades are marked; Patent applied for, Patent pending or  unmarked if probably custom made by Emerson for special friends. This fan came from the P. E. Chapman factory. He was a personal friend and camping buddy of Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and other early electrical innovators. He also invented the growler and assisted in the development of the first electrical system for automobiles. His main product, which is still being used is the Chapman winding machine on which 80% of all the worlds motors were wound at that time. In his basement, with a dirt floor, I saw a primitive Emerson motor and asked him about it. He said it was the prototype for his first machine (with a piece of bicycle chain [from the 1800s] to drive the counter). He asked if I would like to have that old thing. I graciously accepted it, restored it, and put a sterling silver tag on it to preserve the history. He got a laugh out of that.
The M 1 Meston (both versions) was 6 winged. The M 2 was 5 winged. The EI 1 was 4 or 5 winged windmill early and 4 or 5 winged Parker later. The F I 1 was 4, 5 or 6 winged (windmill or Parker). The EI 2 (15") was 4 winged in corresponding types and years.  The FI 2 was 4 or 5 wing normally unless you happened to be in the "inner circle"--same types and years. I didn't question Mr. chapman about it. That was the way he got it ( 6 wings). Interestingly the EI 21 16" type of 1900 was the first residential fan running at 1/2 speed and was 4 winged. Most literature lists these fans (EI 1&2 and FI 1&2) as having been produced until 1900. They were actually made and listed until 1902.
The recent info about Edwin Pillsbury brought back memories of when I went to his estate sale. I think you saw his personal punching bag that I brought to the 2013 Fan Fair. No one else seemed interested, at the sale, and I ended up buying all the Century literature, history and his signed textbooks from college, etc..

Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 12:53 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 01:08 am
   
165th Post
Bill Hoehn
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Russ,
Thanks for correcting me again. You are a real pro at that. I did not post the picture but certainly gave George, my friend, permission to take and use it. Their have been so many here recently I was curious to see whose picture it is. Of course you know it's Copyrighted at the moment of conception, not when the papers come through, if you want to bother.

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 01:34 am
   
166th Post
George Durbin
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Hi Everyone!
It's way to late! I have already made thousands in royalties off those photos!!

Geo...

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 02:13 am
   
167th Post
Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Russ,
Thanks for correcting me again. You are a real pro at that. I did not post the picture but certainly gave George, my friend, permission to take and use it. Their have been so many here recently I was curious to see whose picture it is. Of course you know it's Copyrighted at the moment of conception, not when the papers come through, if you want to bother.

Bill, once again with all due respects to you, I don't take pleasure in correcting anyone. I just want the information to be right to the best of my abilities. 
 
I also want to make clear I meant nothing harmful in my statement prior that I could care less about what, how many, fans or catalogues you have.  You possess a very fine collection.  As silly as it sounds, I just don't feel it's my business in what, or how much you have. But thanks for sharing, I know others that didn't know you want to get to know you much better now.  I too have seen some very nice early items that you may not have.  I just however like some others keep a low profile in the stuff department.  That is matter of choice.
 
I love to post fan history as close to the money as I can. That is why I can be a pain at times in the midst of a post such as this. I assure you I mean no harm when I come down on something I think is not correct.
 
If you want me to delete your Pillsbury motor image from this post I will do so. No problem. 
 
Your a man up in years doing the best that you can, and I am sure then some.  Take care of yourself with an apple and a clove of garlic a day.  

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 09:51 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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George,
As one sickly old man to another, I just wanted everyone to know your latest check never arrived for my percentage of the royalties. Being so decrepit, as you already know, sure has it's advantages and disadvantages, and would you please refresh my failing memory as to what our arrangement is?
geMERSON Bill 

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 01:55 pm
   
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George Durbin
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Bill Hoehn wrote: George,
As one sickly old man to another, I just wanted everyone to know your latest check never arrived for my percentage of the royalties. Being so decrepit, as you already know, sure has it's advantages and disadvantages, and would you please refresh my failing memory as to what our arrangement is?
geMERSON Bill 


Hi Bill!
Let me jog your memory! The deal was... Me and Mike Mirin would take pictures in exchange for donuts and a ride in that bad a*s*s vintage Dodge of yours! It was a little rainy that day and we didn't get to ride in the Dodge. So...  you still owe us a ride!!!    ;)

Geo...


Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 04:29 pm by George Durbin

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 03:46 pm
   
170th Post
Brad Chaney
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"worthless Century"   :(

Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 03:47 pm by Brad Chaney

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 04:40 pm
   
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George Durbin
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Bill Hoehn wrote: George, John  and Jeff,
 
I sincerely appreciate your positive comments and interest in the old Emersons.  I have much more unknown information (to most) that I enjoy sharing with those who value the facts and don't try to change them.
 
I'll have to hurry though, because our first great grandchild Stella arrived this week, and I hope to be able to enjoy her! That's a whole other story. Her mother was working in surgery when her "water" broke, so she called for relief, went to her car and drove to the maternity ward. She said the delivery "was easy---nothing to it"! That's not what Laverne said when Stella's grandfather was born and I can't repeat what she did say!  One friend says Stella comes "from sturdy stock". Sorry that's off track.
 
Any questions about Emersons? The company referred them to Warren and me the last couple of decades. Warren was  a self-taught electrician and much more knowledgeable than I. Emerson and their successor apparently have no interest in their past. They refused  my offer to give them old Emerson publications and they were nice enough to let me copy all of theirs. Some were destroyed or lost while being transferred from one plant to another. Incidentally,  one of their later motor plants was in Menominee Mich.


Hi Bill!

How can anyone not be positive on this forum... All the research and history about fans is amazing to me... Also it is just as amazing the lack of info on so many fans and the history behind them! When its all said and done, and "if' all our fans just disappeared poof like, Would it really matter in the long run? We would spend time doing other things. No one holds a gun to our heads and we are free to prosper and grow any way we want too! 3/4ths of the population on this world are not free to do as we do. To have so much time to collect fans and any other hobby we want to says soo much about our country!
geo...


Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:59 pm by George Durbin

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:40 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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George Durbin wrote: Bill Hoehn wrote: George, John  and Jeff,
 
I sincerely appreciate your positive comments and interest in the old Emersons.  I have much more unknown information (to most) that I enjoy sharing with those who value the facts and don't try to change them.
 
I'll have to hurry though, because our first great grandchild Stella arrived this week, and I hope to be able to enjoy her! That's a whole other story. Her mother was working in surgery when her "water" broke, so she called for relief, went to her car and drove to the maternity ward. She said the delivery "was easy---nothing to it"! That's not what Laverne said when Stella's grandfather was born and I can't repeat what she did say!  One friend says Stella comes "from sturdy stock". Sorry that's off track.
 
Any questions about Emersons? The company referred them to Warren and me the last couple of decades. Warren was  a self-taught electrician and much more knowledgeable than I. Emerson and their successor apparently have no interest in their past. They refused  my offer to give them old Emerson publications and they were nice enough to let me copy all of theirs. Some were destroyed or lost while being transferred from one plant to another. Incidentally,  one of their later motor plants was in Menominee Mich.


Hi Bill!

How can anyone not be positive on this forum... All the research and history about fans is amazing to me... Also it is just as amazing the lack of info on so many fans and the history behind them! When its all said and done, and "if' all our fans just disappeared poof like, Would it really matter in the long run? We would spend time doing other things. No one holds a gun to our heads and we are free to prosper and grow any way we want too! 3/4ths of the population on this world are not free to do as we do. To have so much time to collect fans and and any other hobby we want to says soo much about our country!
geo...



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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:47 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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For what it's worth ... a random purchase I made about a year ago seems loosely related to this thread. I have no idea what this box is supposed to do, but the endbells are cool so I bought it.

Attached Image (viewed 1787 times):

DSC_5667a.jpg

Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:58 pm by Jeff Whitfield

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:48 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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Whatever it is, it's a total bootleg job.

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Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:49 pm by Jeff Whitfield

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:50 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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George,
 You are so right about this hobby. I just finished restoring a framed piece of crewel embroidery about 200 to 300  years old, and some early weapons 400 to 500 years old.
I wonder how many people will be collecting and restoring fans several hundred years from now? 

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:57 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Whatever it is Jeff, I love it!If you ever decide to part with it keep me in mind. I have tons of trading material also!

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:57 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Whatever it is Jeff, I love it! If you ever decide to part with it keep me in mind. I have tons of trading material also!

Last edited on Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:59 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 05:59 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill and Jeff, I would like to get more information about the FRONT bronze end bells used by Emerson on their Meston and bronze bell induction motors. 

Bill, would you be so kind as to compare the best you can with your bronze motor fans to see if the front bell, other than the slot in the top front for the Meston top switch model, is otherwise identical in size, shape, and other details?   From the photos I have seen it looks like they may have come from the same pattern but with the top switch model having the slot milled into the casting.  Does it look like the slot is milled or cast at the time of pouring?
Jeff, I'd love to see a photo taken from the side of your Meston FRONT end bell and showing where the slot for the switch lever is or, if it's from a later back switch fan motor, the area where the slot would be on the top switch models.  I have a feeling that the bronze front end bell used on both top and back switch models is the same casting from the same pattern.   Thank you both.

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 08:57 pm
   
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Jim Kovar
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Jeff Whitfield wrote: For what it's worth ... a random purchase I made about a year ago seems loosely related to this thread. I have no idea what this box is supposed to do, but the endbells are cool so I bought it.


Jeff, I think your Meston end belled box

may be a "home brewed" rotary spark gap
used in the early (Morse code) days  of
amateur (ham) radio.
 
Compare the innards of your box with
the pic below.  Are there similarities? 

Attached Image (viewed 876 times):

rotarysparkgap.jpg

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 Posted: Mon Jul 7th, 2014 11:51 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Steve,
 
Sorry for the delay but I had to take an old (86 years) buddy to the hospital. See, there is someone older than I.
 
I studied several Mestons of both types :), and took the end bells off of both types :).  I checked the fronts visually and with a caliper, thinking that any minute differences could be the result of different patterns and castings. No casting #s were seen. The machined and threaded areas are identical, as are the oil ports and inserts. They are open and were packed wih loose wool batting.
 
The slot in the top switch Meston was cast and can only be determined, usually, from the inside with a palpable edge and no machine marks.
 
You can see the obvious differences in the back end bells of both Mestons :) , with the extra holes for the switch and contacts of the hanging switch type. What is not so apparent is the necessary, different oiler position. Instead of being cast in the small bearing area, it is in the outer surface and has an additional port cast inside to reach the shaft.
 
Hope this helps, Steve
 
Bill
 
P. S. The devil added the :) s !!!

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 Posted: Tue Jul 8th, 2014 12:46 am
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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Jim Kovar wrote: Jeff Whitfield wrote: For what it's worth ... a random purchase I made about a year ago seems loosely related to this thread. I have no idea what this box is supposed to do, but the endbells are cool so I bought it.


Jeff, I think your Meston end belled box

may be a "home brewed" rotary spark gap
used in the early (Morse code) days  of
amateur (ham) radio.
 
Compare the innards of your box with
the pic below.  Are there similarities? 

It does look similar with that huge cog-wheel-look-alike rotor.
I showed this to Rod Rogers in Harrison and he said the same thing, but I'd forgotten about it. Cool! Now there are a couple of people who think the same thing ... so possible something to it. 

Attached Image (viewed 856 times):

DSC_5680a.jpg

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 11:11 am
   
182nd Post
Bill Hoehn
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Hi Steve,  
 
  I can understand why you haven't responded to my post about Meston end bells with the work you have disposing of Bill's collection. Having been in a similar situation with Warren's "stuff", (maybe 25 to 50 times as much in volume) you still have my sympathy as stated before.
 
  Reviewing my last post, and knowing how loquacious I am about fans, it dawned on me that I never directly answered your questions.
 
   The front end bells on both Mestons being discussed are identical, and the slots in the top switch model is cast, before being machined for the finishing.   

Last edited on Wed Jul 9th, 2014 11:14 am by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 03:19 pm
   
183rd Post
Steve Stephens
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Thanks Bill and that pretty much answered my question.  If you have the chance sometime it would be cool to see a few photos of the top switch bell from the inside showing the slot area and, also, the back switch end bell of the same area.  Don't go to the trouble of taking the fans apart but, if you have them apart to admire them for any reason, a few shots would be great.

My reason for asking was to see if it would have been feasible or likely for Emerson to have used the same pattern for the front end bell for top and back switch models.   It looks like a good chance.

Yes, Bill's stuff is turning into quite the project and I brought home more trash yesterday than fans and today may be more of the same as I try to get the fans over to just one unit in the big probability that I will have to pay storage through Auguest before getting the unit vacated.  Bill had some nice fans but not of the age nor quality that Warren must have had; several shelves of Mestons and Gemersons and also more bipolars than Bill had (none).  And those darn old heavy motors; I hope I find a taker for them (think I have but if anyone wants those smaller motors as used on washing machines, general purpose, etc. please ask me.   They could be free for the hauling.  They are mostly older ones and even one Century skeletal.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:05 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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top:

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:06 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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inside:

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:06 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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oil (grease?) cup area:

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:08 pm
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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inside closeup view with oil (grease?) cup area -- bearing:

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DSC_7573ab.jpg

Last edited on Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:10 pm by Jeff Whitfield

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 Posted: Wed Jul 9th, 2014 05:18 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Thank you Jeff. You have the start of a nice Meston fan motor and I would not be surprised if some day those parts were made into a fan.

Can you see evidence on the front cover is the switch lever slot is milled into the cover after casting or some indication shows that the slot is either cast into the cover or partially cast then finished up with milling or if any marks on the INSIDE of the cover show the slot was cast or outlined to show where to mill?   Trying to find out if the front and the rear switch front motor Meston castings started life EXACTLY the same for both fans and probably came from the same pattern or if there were any minor or major differences between the slotted cover and the cover used on rear switch models.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2014 07:54 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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To Anyone Interested,
 
Because of quite a few requests in person, by phone and by "private mail"---(or whatever it is), requesting more stories about Warren Kernell, I've decided to share a few. I have enough to write a book from the last 30+ years with Warren. 
 
We first met at his shop and he was working with Gus, the owner, an electrician and possibly an Electrical Engineer. Gus had no interest in old fans or antiques and ridiculed what we enjoyed!
 
 There were antique and second-hand shops along the street with Southside Electric and I would hit them all while working in the city for the St. Louis Health Dept. The neighborhood then was not the finest (it has improved very much and Warren's building is now being restored to it's original condition and layout). One neighborhood second-hand store is now a famous restaurant frequented by Oprah Winfrey & her entourage. Our friend, the former owner and gentleman who tried to keep the street and alleys cleaned up, was worked over with a machete---he survived. Another lady antique dealer down the street was worked over with a pipe---she survived also. A third gal was not so fortunate. They found her remains in a stairwell behind a vacant building about three doors away.
 
Other examples of the neighborhood condition, (and I did not have a concealed carry permit then), were the graffiti and broken windows. We boarded up each window as they were broken, and the police told us a different story about how the last one happened.  As I remember, it was a typical hot, humid St. Louis Sunday afternoon when a guy approached one of the street girls for you know what. She told him, "no way in this heat unless you get that big fan out of Warren's front window!" That was the last of the glass.
 
Despite this atmosphere we felt reasonably safe during regular hours---8 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday, but I never knew Warren to refuse to meet someone needing help after hours or on the weekend. He would even go to a known customer's home if necessary, or take them to the hospital or elsewhere. Many were sweet little elderly ladies who would reward him with a cake or other gift. Because he kept many small businesses going, they would bring us things like Kentucky Fried Chicken, donuts, and home made candy from that world famous Crown Candy Kitchen. They also remembered Warren and they gave him fans. I remember a feather vane, a lollipop, and many others. One day Warren came up to the locked gate and there in the tall grass was a Western Electric bi-polar that someone left for him.
 
He also sold no scrap but gave it to needy people. I remember one young lady, with children, who had lost her husband and job and was trying to "make ends meet". We always slipped them a few dollars too. Some abused him and came by  every, or sometimes several times a day.
 
That's a start and I don't want to bore everyone, but if you want more, it's almost endless. As I've often said, Warren was like a brother to me.
 
Bill

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 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2014 11:02 pm
   
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Mark Behrend
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If you were ever to write a book Bill , I will buy one!

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 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2014 11:09 pm
   
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Larry Hancock
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Me too. Never boring!

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 01:49 am
   
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Jon Brown
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Same here

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 02:06 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Thanks Mark, Larry and Jon.
With you're encouragement more will follow. Please let me know when to stop, otherwise I'll wait for "Michelangelo time".  When he was finishing (I believe) the doors to the Sistine Chapel, the time seemed excessive and when his sponsor asked when the doors would be finished, he replied, "Whenever they take them away."
Bill
 
 

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 02:06 am
   
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John Trier
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Bill ......... If you have the time and desire, I think it's very important to document the stories of people we know and love.   For the record.   A great man I knew, who recently passed away, said that "everyone" should write a book of his life before it's too late. 

Last edited on Fri Jul 11th, 2014 02:07 am by John Trier

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 11:55 am
   
195th Post
Dan Hilton
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Put me on the 'not bored' list too.

Being it's so close to home and had opportunities to visit the place it makes the stories that much more interesting.

 

Thanks Doc.

 

 

Dan H.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 12:37 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Morning John & Dan,
 
Turning on my computer this AM, all I could get for awhile was a warning "OFF TOPIC POSTINGS WILL BE DELETED". If this means the end of my stories about Warren , so be it! The moderator must be clairvoyant because my thoughts for the day are mine and Warren's and they are controversial. I apologize ahead of time to those who feel differently and may be offended. We were definitely part of the silent minority.
 
  More Warren, Life and Fans.  
 
Warren loved language and word usage. We spent countless hours with his huge Webster dictionary always at hand in the shop.
 
Warren and I traded and gave each other many small electrical things (old light bulbs---some DC, Benjamin sockets, Tesla & Edison apparatus and books etc.) over the next few years . Not one penny ever exchanged hands for this. After a few years together we both knew that whatever either of us had, belonged to both of us.
 
Because at that time, he had to make a living with his work and I had the luxury of being retired, I did our fan restorations.  He trained me in the proper use of tools as complicated as the lathe and as simple as a file. Not being an electrician, he would tell me all of the electrical needs and I would make them, trusting him, whether it was a Meston or a Polar Cub.
 
After high school, college and service overseas (Europe), Warren returned and started finding and restoring more fans. He had been collecting, tearing apart, rebuilding, improving and designing many things since childhood. With his ingenuity he made a lot of specialized tools. His father was the comptroller for Guth ELectric and he had a lot of contact with the company workers and salesmen. I have his log, of all of his finds, with entries including date, brand, type, source, price, condition, restoration, numbers ( with purple felt---his favorite color) and final gifting to many present AFCA members. That will be another post if there is interest.
 
With my disillusionment with the medical profession, mainly because of insurance and government interference, making it no longer enjoyable, I retired. That started my long relationship with Warren and his shop. I first approached him for advice about what to do with my long accumulated group of fans. He told me all about them and aroused my interest in possible restoration. I asked if he would help and if I could come join him at the shop. He said, "No, this a one man shop!" His partner Gus had died before this. After a few more visits and a lot more questions he relented and said, "Be here at 8 AM next Monday." He had cleared off about a foot of workbench for me. I was careful to be a good student. Each day he cleared off about another foot of bench until I had the whole 8 feet or so. It obviously worked out well because we then worked together, usually three days a week, for about the next 25 years.
 
  I'm going to stop here until I see if this too OFF TOPIC to continue.
 Bill        

Last edited on Fri Jul 11th, 2014 12:44 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 03:54 pm
   
197th Post
Larry Hancock
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Bill,stories about Warren and any other fan collector are certainly ON topic. You feel free!

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 04:08 pm
   
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George Durbin
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Hi Larry!
 
Thanks for that tip of the hat to Bill! I live in a farming community, and back in the day in the old days of farming it was common in this area of Indiana to use the 32 volt Delco Light systems. To make a long story short most of these guys are 90 years old and older! I enjoy listening to the stories they tell of these units being delivered by horse and buggy and the pranks they pulled on each other which were quite dangerous! So Bill if you can make Fan Fair, I will listen to any and all of your stories... Fire away!!
 
geo...

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 04:21 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill, I hope you do continue with your wonder off topic posts about Warren and you.  You are probably more ON Topic than many posts here as you are telling us about your and Warren's early history of fans, etc.  I find this most interesting and enjoyable to read about.  Thank you.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 11:09 pm
   
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John Trier
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Steve Stephens wrote: Bill, I hope you do continue with your wonder off topic posts about Warren and you.  You are probably more ON Topic than many posts here as you are telling us about your and Warren's early history of fans, etc.  I find this most interesting and enjoyable to read about.  Thank you.

I completely agree and keep checking this thread for more stories. 

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