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Missing Link Found in Saint Louis  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 12:01 am
   
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Stephen Chew
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Thanks Bill for all your great stories and knowledge

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 01:04 am
   
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Steve Cunningham
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I agree. Keep the stories coming.

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 01:15 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Thanks guys,
Warren and Some Friends
 
Warren was a loner in some ways. I could never talk him into going to Fan-Fair with me, or even a regional meet. In fact during the St. Louis gatherings, he would lock the doors, turn off his phone and try to avoid any contact. Even though he visited my house, as have most of the early members of the AFCA, he never invited me to his house in 25 years.  I would pick him up a few times, but he always met me outside.
 
In his shop, he was very comfortable and would drop everything to entertain friends while showing and talking fans and motors or anything else electrical. He always skipped lunch and used an antique coffee grinder to make his ever present brew. Most friends were allowed in the basement because of the toilet, but not everyone was invited upstairs and especially into his "inner sanctum" with it's treasures.  
 
There were members who stopped regularly when in town for follow up visits at Barnes Hospital and one who we could count on to visit yearly for the stockholders meeting at Emerson. One particular friend, who I shall never forget was an eccentric professor with whom Warren enjoyed experimenting. I witnessed them set up a motor which I was sure could and would not run, but it did, in either direction ---no self start---definitely a spin start! They used a car battery with leads to a pair of ball-bearings with a steel shaft in the inner race. That was it---NO stator. It ran beautifully but the bearings pitted quickly. Field? Air? Any explanations?
 
I think we'll all remember his frequent phone response---"You're looking well today." He also could be very mischievous---from a distance. He repaired an  electric trolling motor for a mutual friend of ours, and decided to use all of his almost empty spray paint cans to decorate it. Of course he had me do it so he could innocently and truthfully say he didn't do it. It broke us all up. (You had to be there!)  He heard three of us talking about old time sauerkraut with sausage that another of our member's wives made, with details of how long it aged in large crocks. He had to have some and just raved about it from then on. None of us could tell him it came straight out of a can.
 
Even I'm getting bored with this. It'd had better get more interesting, or I'll quit or be fired.
 
 
 
 
 

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 02:57 am
   
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Ron Jeter
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Hey Bill: Maybe this will refresh you some - Got this one today!

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Last edited on Sat Jul 12th, 2014 02:58 am by Ron Jeter

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 03:49 am
   
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Larry Hancock
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Nice Ron!!! Homerun!!! Bill, keep them coming. If Warren can live in your memories, let it be!

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 10:25 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Ron, I'M REALLY JEALOUS!!!
WHAT A WAY TO WAKE UP ON THIS BEAUTIFUL MORNING---RIGHT GEORGE?
First, I've never been lucky enough to own a pick-up;
Second, my fishing rods are practically all that old split bamboo;
Third, we sure could use those baseballs here in St. Louis for practice;
Fourth, also I'm envious of that chain hook and it's clever use;
Fifth, I'll be studying your picture all day, after the casino of course, for more              treasures;
Last, You found my missing link that I've been looking for for years---the bottom switch Meston (I mean---Emerson) tripod
CONGRATULATIONS---NO ONE DESERVES IT MORE THAN YOU---AND COULD YOU PLEASE SEND ME THE SERIAL NUMBER?

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:46 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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History of Warren Kernell"s earliest restored fans, identified by a folded, purple   piece of felt and a number attached. Some one with an original and the ability to post pictures may wish to do so. It will be interesting to find out where they are now. I will omit the names he entered when he gifted them.
If no brand is listed by me, it is THE BRAND---EMERSON!
C&O = complete & original
1.   type 2010 #455831 12"  from Selkirk (auction house) $3.50 C&O
2.   type 12666 #185038 12" osc. C&O  
3.   GE type A D Form B #112055 12" Goodwill $1.00 (overpriced and needed  bearing)
4.   Western Electric Bipolar 16" DC Gift in 1965 from.....
5.   9" Jr. 11/21/69 Salvation Army $1.00 (bad condition)
6.   Specialties Mfg. Co. 12" water fan, Selkirk 11/24/65 for $12.00 "at 25     P.S.I.-- it uses about 82.5 G.P.H."
7.   Menominee 8" osc. #B15226 O from gunsmith in 1951
8.   Northwind 8" 44C 1966 Junk man $1.00
9.   A. C. Gilbert 6" Koldair
10.  Northwind 8" type 444C
11.  Fitzgerald Mfg. Co. 7" Star-rite 732-SIM Salvation Army 50 cents 1966
12.  B-Jr. 8" osc. $4.00 1958
13.  8" type 14644 # 165670
14.  8" type 1500 # 153029 (silver magnet wire), traded a clockmaker for a 12" GE osc.
15.  GE 6" Series F 1961
I'm going to skip, what I believe to be common fans!
19.  Trojan 12" type 5110 #512932 from Tabb's Elec. New Orleans 1969 $12.00
20.  Robbins & Myers 16" air driven osc. THE STANDARD Selkirk 1964
21. Adams-Bagnall  12' osc. Jandus # 49320 Selkirk 7/16/69 $3.50
23.  Century 12" osc. type S3 model 15 # 25851 1965
24. GE 12" osc # 619898 Selkirk $3.00 C&O last patent June 25, 01
26.  Western Electric Bipolar 15" universal #G93 Salvation Army $1.50 1967 "2 Pole Series with 3 speed winding in one field coil"
28.  Westinghouse 12" Style 60877 traded Junk man , last patent Dec. 26, 93
29.  Trojan 12" type 5310 #527449 Selkirk $3.75 June 7, 1967
32.  GE 12" 1905 type Selkirk $1.25 1965
33.  Type 1500 8" # 152178 Salvation Army $2.00 1966
34.  Silver Swan 10" C&O Salvation Army $1.00 1969
39.  Type 12648 16" osc. # 182588 1966
41.  Type 19666 # 465600 restored 1968
44.  Type27666 # A31093  Gift from........in 1954. She purchased it in 1919.
47.  Peerless 12" front osc. Junk man $1.00
48.  Type 16046 #566356 12" DC osc. Junk man $1.00
49.  Type 24066 #416771 12" DC osc. Junk man $1.00
50.  Type 77046AJ 12" DC osc. Salvation Army $1.00
52.  GE 12" osc. #382686 "Interesting rowing motion oscillator 1909 design"
54. Type 11644 #158056 8" Goodwill 1962
56.  Menominee 8" "clamshell" #11811 Jakes Antiques $4.00 1970
57.  GE 12" concealed oscillating mechanism #938942  75423  01  $5.00 1970
60.  Type 1310 #450635 12"
"Purchased from the Southern Scrap Iron and Metal Co. .....St. Louis $1.50 August 1972. ...... Fan was in very bad condition. I found it buried in the mud, a tire print across the face. It was badly rusted and the blade was crushed and broken. Painted  New head wire  repaired centrifugal switch  welded blade  straightened and soldered guard  constructed and installed a felt covered base plate"
I QUIT!!!

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:56 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Bill Hoehn wrote: History of Warren Kernell"s earliest restored fans, identified by a folded, purple   piece of felt and a number attached. Some one with an original and the ability to post pictures may wish to do so. It will be interesting to find out where they are now. I will omit the names he entered when he gifted them.
If no brand is listed by me, it is THE BRAND---EMERSON!
C&O = complete & original
1.   type 2010 #455831 12"  from Selkirk (auction house) $3.50 C&O
That's quite a list Bill and I wondered about the first fan on the list, the Emerson 2010, which I knew that Warren had a very nice one of and could that fan on your list but the fan I now have?

That beautiful fan is sitting right here with me and was my first ebay fan purchase in March 2001.  It's the nicest one I have ever seen and all original as the "C&O" says.   I'd hate to tell you what I paid on ebay but I guess Warren had it for some time.  It was one of the fans that Patrick Partney auctioned off and I was a brand new AFCA member and got really worried when I read about what Partrick did to Warren on a bunch of fans.

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Last edited on Sun Jul 13th, 2014 04:09 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:57 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:57 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:57 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 03:58 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 04:06 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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I have not done anything to the fan other than to possibly put on a coat of Renaissance Wax.  At the time this came up on ebay I had seen Rick Hill's collection of exceptionally nice brass and cast iron fans.  I left his house a bit envious and realized that I did not think I could spend that kind of money for a fan and that c.1920s brass blade, steel cage would have to do for me.   

But I quickly got so interested in the early fans and this one looked so pristine that I went for it.  The 12666 was equally nice and ended about 5 minutes before the 2010.  Since I had money for only one and lost out of the 12666 (still have never had one) I quickly got to going for a manual snipe bid on the 2010 and won it.  

And so it goes, my collection keeps growing by bounds and leaps and, this past week, has almost doubled after the past few years acquiring not many fans.  But most of Bills' fans that I just got will probably be sold in time as it's time to start paring down my lift's collection to a more manageable number.  2010 No. 455831 will probably stay with me for a long time.  For those who love to over restore their fans please note how uneven the black japan is on this fan.  Lumpiness gives character I think.

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 05:55 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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I certainly agree Steve. From the start many years ago, and possibly also because I don't have the artistic ability, I have always said I want my fans just as they came out of the factory. I cringe every time I see a fan with brass where there should be steel or any modification, whatsoever. Of course we do have to compromise on such things as head wire which today is nowhere close to the original. I have dissected and studied it with the flat wire and cotton (?) construction. Even though its tough to solder it is remarkable. This motivates me to do a separate post on it from some of the factory literature.  

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 06:02 pm
   
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Stephen Chew
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What an impressive list of fans. I feel good that I have a few of those on the list. Of course, my 2010 cost more than all the fans on the list combined and then some. More great knowledge of Warren. Thank you Bill.

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 06:20 pm
   
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Steve Stephens
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Speaking of original head wires Bill Voigt had shown me a NOS Emerson Jr. head wire he had and I came across it in his storage unit and now have it here.  Will try to post a photo in time but no time now.  I'd love to see what you have on original cords.

Link to older thread about Stefan's  c.1895-96 Emerson Induction motor tripod
http://www.afcaforum.com/forum1/20146.html

Last edited on Mon Mar 2nd, 2015 09:59 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 08:19 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Found it!
 
Emerson Technical Data--Desk fans--Oscillator--Switch Cord N0. 2022.--Date--Nov. 12, 1930.
 
"Life of Switch Cord.When we first started investigating the possibilities of tinsel cord some five years ago, a sample cord was obtained. This was larger both in copper and in fabric covering than we could accommodate in our fan, but on the basis that the larger cord would be stiffer and more subject to breakage than a lighter and more flexible cord, it was put on our cord test machine. To date this cord has made 228,000,000 complete oscillations and is still operating.
 
 Sample cords were then obtained from the manufacturer to our specifications of somewhat lighter copper and fabric. Two of these samples were put on the cord test machine and have made  168,000,000 oscillations to date. After the cord was approved and put into production, a sample was taken at random from the first lot of production and put on the cord test machine and has now made approximately 140,000,000 complete oscillations. About a year later another cord was put on run and now has made 90,000,000 oscillations. All of the cords referred to were still in operation on Nov. 12, 1930.
 
Eliminating the first two tests, which were on sample cords, and taking the third, which was from regular production material, the 140,000,000 oscillations are equivalent to approximately 35 years of 24 hours a day operation on a standard fan. Figuring 500 hours a year as being average operation of a fan, it would be equivalent to 580 years' life.
 
Some cases of breakage will doubtless be reported from time to time but it is believed these will be due to peculiar conditions of the installation or an occasional defect of material, which must be expected."
 
My examination---1996
 
A random cord, cut from a typical Emerson desk fan of that era, revealed the following;
 
There are 35 strands of 0.0025" copper tinsel wire in each "bundle", and three "bundles" per conductor or 105 strands in each. Because this is a three conductor wire, there are therefore 315 strands total. Also the strands are tightly coiled (for flexibility) resulting in the finished wire having  525 feet of tinsel wire per foot of cord!
 
The wire also contains one "filler" in the center, and a brown woven cover, enclosed in two layers of black woven cover, assumed to be cotton.
 
I wish, but doubt, that his fine wire could be duplicated!
 
 Emerson Bill

Last edited on Sun Jul 13th, 2014 08:36 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Mon Jul 14th, 2014 02:25 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Steve,
 
   I just found out how you lose  your reply when you open a picture---the hard way.
 
  After reviewing your pictures and Warren's notes, I now remember my restoring your 2010. It didn't take much, but replacing the head wire, line cord, rubber feet and leather washers under the wing nuts. I don't remember about the base and whether I recast that switch handle or did anything to the switch itself or it's cover.
 
  Enjoy,
 
 Bill

Last edited on Mon Jul 14th, 2014 02:27 am by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Fri Jul 18th, 2014 12:49 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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MESTON TWINS OBITUARY
 
Realizing it has been some time since the demise of the original Meston Tripod twins, and their provenance and records have been accepted by almost all of the concerned parties, may they R.I.P.  I decided to proceed with the next chapter in the Meston Tripod family and hope to then continue with their descendants the Emerson Tripods.
 
The next relative, born in 1897, was the so called banded Tripod.  I named them that for the nickel bands surrounding the motor.  "We will retain the black base and band, but in place of the polished bronze covers, they will be finished in aluminum finish or plain bronze----".  They continued with the hanging switch of the second model Meston, but it was considerably smaller.  The nameplate (still brass) was elongated and has a third rivet in the center.  The rivets have smaller heads than the first two Mestons , but the tag has the same data and patents.
 
This fan has a unique guard.  "1897 Wire Guard can be used only on the 1897-type of Motors".  This information is in two of my different 1897 catalogs.
 
Somewhere in this period, and I have not been able to document where or why, Emerson switched from the different bronze end bells to aluminum finished iron ones stamped Emerson rather than Meston. Both types are known to exist.
 
The next year,1898, saw the introduction of the New 1898 Fan Motor which we will save for the next installment, since it is so different, and then the I.V.S. Mestons and the hanging switch Mestons and Emersons are obsolete!
 
From here on it should be less confusing,
 
 EMERSON BILL

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 Posted: Fri Jul 18th, 2014 12:55 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Since the computer will not let me edit the above, I meant cast not stamped iron end bells.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 03:05 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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                                              EMERSON TRIPODS
 
Continuing the progression of Emerson history and manufacturing with the New for 1899 tripod from memory, observation and the Emerson catalogs and other literature of that era, I have concluded the following:
 
The Mestons and Emersons previously discussed were still sold until they no longer appear in the 1899 catalog. Those were the "Old Reliable Meston" (Brush and Commutator) with the top switch and the "New Emerson Induction Meston" with the hanging switch.
 
1899 saw the introduction of the Parker blade and the hollow shaft motor, which persisted in the better and higher priced Emersons from then on even in the 1970 models. The 1899 catalog No. 2008 devotes five detailed pages to describing the new fan and blade. All of the cuts show the elongated brass name plates with three rivets and the white porcelain switch without the binding post screws of the later models. The first bracket fans are also pictured with the long narrow bracket (always used with and sold separately for the tripods). I have never seen one! They recommended putting brackets in several rooms and just moving the fan. The first circular bracket base appeared in 1901.
 
For 1900, catalog No. 2110 announces; "The twelve months just past have seen the most phenomenal advance in all values that has occurred in the history of the United States. "Iron increased 137%, copper 35%, Cotton 43% and all the raw materials for motors 64%. The switch for 1900 is improved over 1899 by using insulated binding post screws, and the first Residence Fan is introduced, the 16" E.I. 21.
 
In 1901, catalog No. 2215 we find twelve "standard" models listed---tripods from above---plus four "Special" models. "This Special Model Desk Fan will be found to be the smallest, lightest and most efficient alternating current fan motor ever placed on the market." This year they also introduced the first fluted round base, (and bracket) swivel and trunnion fan produced by Emerson. They also made it in swivel without trunnion and the outer part of the base was plain, not fluted. These models, the P.I. 241 and P.I. 242 had aluminum name plates as did the later "Standard" model tripods.
 
BY 1902, AND THE CATALOG No. 2320 ALL TRIPODS HAVE DISAPPEARED AND ARE NOW HISTORY!   
EMERSON BILL
 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 10:45 am
   
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John Trier
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Bill Hoehn wrote:                                               EMERSON TRIPODS
 
Continuing the progression of Emerson history and manufacturing with the New for 1899 tripod from memory, observation and the Emerson catalogs and other literature of that era, I have concluded the following:
 



Thanks Bill for your insights and catalog interpretations.    Can't get enough of this stuff.   Very interesting that "old reliable" models were offered for sale well after new models appeared........ Does that mean dating Mestons is no longer possible with any degree of certainty?  

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 12:19 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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John, I had never thought of it that way. You raise an interesting question and add to the confusion with the Mestons.  The manufacturing started in 1891 even though the company was founded in 1890.  Because the same models were made for several years, as is true in most fan models, I believe the only way to date them is through the numbers (not called serial numbers by Emerson in the early days). This is why Ron Jeters work is so valuable. My record of the first day of production of every motor and fan Emerson made does NOT go back to the Mestons. Also as far as I have been able to ascertain, they kept NO record of yearly production numbers and ending date.
 
Of course we can date to the specific year when they list the improvements for that year in a catalog, and it is gone the next year---eg. the tripod with the first porcelain switch which was used for only one year.

Last edited on Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 12:27 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 01:44 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Emerson established in Oct. of 90 with 24 year old Alexander Meston established as Superintendent and engineer. The Cone base brushed AC fan motor is clearly stated on the market in 91 and doing well.  
 
25 year old Alexander Meston was a busy beaver and patents were once again filed in 92.  Alexander had clearly designed the first "old reliable" for the 92 season. By August of 92 Emerson's business had outgrown its present facility and had to relocate for expansion. Improvements were made to the "old reliable" in the next few years. 
 
Alexander Meston it is stated contracted consumption(Tuberculosis) in December of 92 and fought a 7 month battle until his death in June of 93. Beyond Alexander's death who slapped together that brushless induction fan motor....Charles?
 
I can only find books to support the induction motor model introduced to the market in 95.  However, the brushed "old reliable" remained on the market despite the introduction of the brushless model.  This would make complete sense as the Electrical Appliance Co.(Emerson's primary) agency had established the "old reliable" to the consumer and faith was built upon it.
 
Emerson it is stated was compelled to move forward with the induction motor as it appears around 1895 60 hertz was becoming strongly supported in the electrical field.    

Last edited on Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 01:47 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 03:12 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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All that comes to mind at the moment for brushless induction fan motors for 95 are Emerson, GE, and Westinghouse.  H ell....even the intense innovative Robert Lundell(Interior Conduit) couldn't cough up a brushless AC fan motor in 95 of his own design.
 
Gordon Scott and Elisha Ries sold out their funky design brushed AC fan motor for a 10 spot in 95. The remaining Ries & Scott fan motors sold out in Chicago and the east coast.  Scott than jumped back in business teamed with Janney to produce a brushless desk fan motor it appears introduced for the 96 season.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 05:56 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Nice to hear from you Russ,
As you know I'm not an electrical engineer, and relied on Warren to handle that aspect of our relationship. It also explains why I can't discuss the various types of motors intelligently. I rely on the "experts" to do that.
For example Edwin S. Pillsbury, (founder of Century Elec.), while an engineer for Emerson, in 1896 developed Emerson's first single phase power induction motor. Is that significant to our discussion?
Decades ago, I went through the St. Louis City Directories and found their locations and changes.
!890=Meston Brothers Elec. 904 Olive St.
!891=513-514 Elm St.
1892=1108-1110 St. Charles St.
1895=1108-1110-1112 St Charles St.
Also 1895=714-716-718 St Charles St. (3rd floor)
1903= New 6 story building- 21st & Washington
1914=leased 2 top floors--where?
1917=leased more space--where?
1920=New 6 story building--adjacent to above.
1927=added 6 story building with bridge attaching.
1939=3 buildings-2 adjoining at 20th & Washington and 3rd at 20th & Lucas
1940=moved to their present location in Ferguson (a St. Louis suburb) which is  still their World Headquarters.
Viewing these locations, which I have done with quite a few AFCA members, is fun and especially with a stop at our world famous Crown Candy Kitchens.
Glad everyone agrees on the first three Meston models, #1 round base 1891 model, #2 round base 1892 model, and #3 Top switch tripod model.
We have 2 holdouts in the world on the Meston hanging switch model, but those that have them continue to enjoy them:).

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 09:36 pm
   
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Tom Dreesen
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Bill,

We have discussed the 513/514 address before on the forum.

If St. Louis held to "norms", these would be on opposite sides of the street and the famous photo of the 1891 round base would have been taken from the second floor of 514 across the street to 513.

Is this correct?


Tom

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 09:48 pm
   
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Jim Kovar
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Tom Dreesen wrote: Bill,

We have discussed the 513/514 address before on the forum.


My theory, and I'm sticking with it!  :tease

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Emerson Electric Mfg. Co., 1891.jpg

Last edited on Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 09:54 pm by Jim Kovar

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 Posted: Wed Jul 23rd, 2014 10:03 pm
   
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Tom Dreesen
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Jim Kovar wrote: Tom Dreesen wrote: Bill,

We have discussed the 513/514 address before on the forum.


My theory, and I'm sticking with it!  :tease

OK, lousy memory, 513 second floor across to 514.

Kovar is still full of it ...

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 12:56 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Tom,
Didn't know about this on the forum in the past. We think alike---no other logical explanation. This is one area where St. Louis does hold to "norms". There are a lot of areas that they don't.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:11 am
   
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George Durbin
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Tom,
Didn't know about this on the forum in the past. We think alike---no other logical explanation. This is one area where St. Louis does hold to "norms". There are a lot of areas that they don't.


Hi Bill!
Tom is right!  Kovar is full of it!!   ;)

Geo...

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:19 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Glad everyone agrees on the first three Meston models, #1 round base 1891 model, #2 round base 1892 model, and #3 Top switch tripod model.
We have 2 holdouts in the world on the Meston hanging switch model, but those that have them continue to enjoy them:).

It is stated Emerson in order to remain progressive with the ever growing 60 cycle system began development on AC induction motors around 95.  Edwin Pillsbury's motor counts too.
 
1891:  Alexander Meston designs and introduces to the market Emerson's first AC cone base fan motor.  The fan was 1/8th HP capable of ONLY ONE SPEED of 2500 RPM.  The cone base model has strong support of only being on the market for the 91 season only.  

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Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:40 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:24 am
   
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Russ Huber
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92 legit electrical books only support Alexander's NEW patented Meston fan motor. The speed of the motor was NOW ADJUSTABLE by turning a thumb screw.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:25 am
   
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Russ Huber
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.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:27 am
   
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Russ Huber
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"The 1892 pattern of the motor has many improvements over the motor as it was made last year."

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Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:31 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 01:46 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ,
 
You are correct on the 1891 round base Meston. It was 11 inches in diameter, and 52 volts only, and had no model # since it was the only one.
 
The 1892 models--round base---(as in the 1892 catalog-Page 60) were:
 
No.2001 for 52 volts, 1.8 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
and the No. 2002 for 104 volts, .9 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
For 1892 "They are now improved and perfected and we guarantee them in every respect."
 
There is NO tripod in Emerson's 1892 catalog. It IS in the 1893 Catalog. 

Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 02:00 am by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 02:29 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Shortly after Alexander's death in 93 the task of setting up agencies in Europe for the Meston fan motor was put in the hands of ............Messrs. Shippey Brothers London England. 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 02:41 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: The 1892 models--round base---(as in the 1892 catalog-Page 60) were:
 
There is NO tripod in Emerson's 1892 catalog. It IS in the 1893 Catalog. 

Baffling.  The legit electrical books beef the h ell out of the new improved Meston Tripod in 92 books.(plural) during the fan motor season.
 
Why would they not have them on the market 92 season?
 
 

Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 02:42 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 03:00 am
   
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Russ Huber
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"The Electrical Appliance Co. is now exhibiting the first one of the 1892 pattern that has been received in Chicago."
 

The above is a direct quote from the right hand May 92 article shown below.  The 1892 pattern is clearly described as a variable speed Meston. Kind of sounds like the Emerson Chicago agency is clearly indicating they have something new and improved right in plain sight.
 
What is your impression Bill?  Respectively said, kind of makes one question a single speed cone based Meston in 92, catalogue supported, or not?

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Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 05:35 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2014 04:47 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Western Electrician - Volumes 16-17 - Page 199 1895 - ‎The Electric Appliance company is opening the spring campaign on the Meston alternating current fan motor with considerable success. A number of improvements have been made in this season's machine, which, added to the great merits the Meston has always possessed, makes a hard combination to beat.
 
 
   

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Knife Switch Meston 1.JPG

Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2014 04:55 am by Russ Huber

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