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 Posted: Fri May 19th, 2017 07:16 pm
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Ralph Poston
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Hi,
I am a old member that has not been on the forum much.

I'M Looking for a diagram or someone to confirm the fan is junk.

  I have had a Westinghouse style 164848G on the shelf for about 6 years.  I got it down and tried to replace the cord.   Checked the head wires and found 3 wires that the ohms were 26, 25, 1.9 .   I have looked for the diagrams in the help section and did not find 1 like that.  



Ralph

 


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 Posted: Sat May 20th, 2017 10:17 am
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Rick Huckabee
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Ralph is it a 2 or 3 head wire model?

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 Posted: Sat May 20th, 2017 12:29 pm
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Ralph Poston
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Rick,





The head has three wires leaving it.  I would guess these

wires were replaced in its lifetime since the black wire has a blue tracer. 

My meter is a cheap one but it usually works for determining the windings. I reread the ohms  The wires are Brown, red, black.  Red and black appear to be the same connection.  

 Ohms are :





Brown to Red 24





Black to Red 0





Brown to Black 24





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 Posted: Sun May 21st, 2017 12:43 pm
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Rick Huckabee
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Ralph , I'd really like to see some pictures of the stator. Is it a Centrifugal start motor? Your description indicates there are 3 wires leaving the stator and connecting  to two wires that possibly go to the switch. If so , I'm guessing it is a split-phase motor with the CS switch. Doesn't matter I suppose that ,(0), number indicating you have a problem in there. There are guys in the group that will check the continuity in each coil , locate the culprit , then surgically dissect it and re-solder. Amazing really . I would rewind it.

Last edited on Sun May 21st, 2017 12:58 pm by Rick Huckabee

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 Posted: Mon May 22nd, 2017 02:08 am
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Ralph Poston
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Thanks for the reply.  I will try to remove the stator and take a look.

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 Posted: Mon May 22nd, 2017 02:13 am
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Steve Stephens
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Bill Voigt's notes say that Westys before the G prefix were centrifugal start motors and those with the open banner cage badge.  Sounds like yours is without the start switch.  Beware if you are going to remove the stator.  It's not too hard for some people and nearly impossible to others.  It's very hard to get the stator out.

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 Posted: Mon May 22nd, 2017 11:27 am
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Ralph Poston
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This fan has a G prefix.  I have similar Westinghouse fan with a crack in the osc housing and headwires too short. I'll try it first. 

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 Posted: Tue May 23rd, 2017 01:39 am
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Darrell Koller
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I believe all the three-strand head wires were not centrifugal start. At least that has been my experience. I have only seen two-strand head wire on stamped steel Westys equipped with centrifugal start switches. I just checked my backlog of fans and I have 4 stamped steel Westys sitting on the shelve downstairs, all of them are centrifugal start models (two-strand headwire). Of my currently restored stamped steel Westy's only one has the three strand headwire and is not centrifugal start. I sold another with a three-strand headwire a few months ago and it also was not centrifugal start.


If you still need the numbers, I can disconnect the speed coil and test the stator on my one remaining stamped steel Westy with three-strand headwire, but from what I remember, the numbers you posted above do not sound correct. Let me know if you still need the specs from my fan. Also, just so I'm sure. That's a four wing model with a four pole motor, right?


---Darrell

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 Posted: Tue May 23rd, 2017 11:00 am
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Ralph Poston
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Darrell,
Looks like a short in the stator.  Thanks for responding.
Ralph

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 Posted: Tue May 23rd, 2017 03:40 pm
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Steve Stephens
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You can try plugging the fan in and go through the speeds to see if there is a short.  But use an in-line "dim bulb tester" and about a 150 watt incandescent bulb.   If the bulb burns full brightness there is a short, if it does not light there is an open.    If everything is ok the bulb will light about half brightness.
Here is my fancy dim bulb tester.   These will save your fan from burning (shorting) out and I often use it when the condition of the wiring is circumspect or dangerous looking.  If the bulb burns lower than normal and the fan starts to run you can plug the fan in direct to power.   Sometimes good to start with the tester at a lower voltage from a variac and bring up the voltage watching the bulb.   A full bright bulb means a short and turn it off.

I should have set this up neater but the red and black clips are attached to a test lead I made from a heater cord from the hardware store.   One side of this "power in" goes directly to one prong of the fan's plug (towards the right) and the other clip goes to one side of the bulb while a lead is attached from the other side of the bulb to the remaining prong on the fan.   The bulb here is screwed into a small porcelain surface mount socket with very short lengths of solid wire attached to each side of the socket and stripped about ¾ on the ends to clip the leads to.





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 Posted: Wed May 24th, 2017 12:09 pm
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Ralph Poston
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Steve,
Thanks for your reply.  That is a good trick.  I used to use the lightbulb for cleaning old radio tuners a long long time ago.
  When I removed the base of this fan to replace the plug wire I found that the switch coil was burned and 2 of the head wires were not connected the red wire was attached to a wire coming from the top center of the switch coil.  I have a Westinghouse style 264848b fan with a cracked osc housing that looks just like it so I removed the switch assembly from it and tried it.  The fan would run slowly with a little help on either 24 ohm winding.  The coil did not heat up.  The switch coil from the 264848b is a little different than the 164848G as it doesn't have a wire at the center of the coil.  Logic tells me that the stator should have a higher winding reading for the Run winding.  I guess I will try the pvc method to remove the stator.  I'll let you know what I find.

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 Posted: Wed May 24th, 2017 04:47 pm
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Ralph Poston
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Found a short in the head the ohm are 25 30 52.  The fan works now.  Thanks

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