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GE Survey - 1894 to 1908  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Mon Jun 5th, 2017 01:30 pm
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Kim Frank
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    Don Eckerson has asked me to take over the 1894 thru 1908 portion of the GE survey. Building on the work of Lawrence Erickson, Prewitt Scripts, and Don,  I will ask all of you to list the GE pancake fans in your collection. Besides the tag information giving the type and form designation, serial number, voltage, and cycles, I would like to get the characteristics of each fan. Is it badged as BTH (British Thomson Huston) or CGE(Canadian General Electric)? What year is the fan? Is it 10", 12", 14", or 16"? Is it a trunnion or stick mount? Desk or Bracket fan? Is it a 4 wing or 6 wing blade? Is the blade hub cast or stamped brass? Is the guard's back ring wrapped or pierced? How many struts? Are they integrated(made as part of) into the cage. Wing bolts or shoulder screws holding motor to trunnion? Also included would be the roundball motored d/c fans produced during the same period.
    I believe this will give us a better picture of how and when the fans were produced. For example, were serial numbers issued in batches for fan models, based on voltages/cycles or styles? I have 1908 model 12" trunnions with serial numbers 324456 and 324457. Both are 100/115v 60 cycles. Then I have same model with serial number 324463 and another with a bit later number of 324658. Both of these fans are 190/220v 60 cycle. So the question is....were fans after 324460 190/220v ? How about 16 inch fans of the same vintage....did they follow any pattern?
    Hopefully, over time and with all of your help, we can put together a very comprehensive guide for these fans. You can list the info in a post to this thread, send it to me in a pm, or email it to me at Kim@Fanimation.com .


Here are examples of how I would prefer each fan to be listed;  (T)=trunnion   (S)= Stick


1903 GE 12 inch (T) type AD form C  s/n 149461, 100/115 v 60 cycle, 4 strut 4 wing cast hub, 10 wire cage pierced. Brass wing bolts.
OR.......
1897 London & Manchester "Punkah" 10 inch (S) Type UI form F 100v 42 cycle s/n 17579, 4 integrated strut cage, 6 wing blade cast hub, nickeled hardware


Any additional characteristics that you think makes the fan unusual are welcome. If I have any questions about a fan listed I will contact you via PM.


Thank you, Kim

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 Posted: Mon Jun 5th, 2017 03:34 pm
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Tim Marks
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Awesome, thanks for doing this! Will get on it.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 6th, 2017 02:22 am
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Steve Stephens
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Good idea to turn the pancake survey over to the Pancake Master, Mr. Kim.
I have had this list made up for some time now and it probably gives you most of the details you are asking for Kim:


Below updated to 5-4-17; all pancakes in my collection
T=trunion S=stick mount
 
Year   size.. frame...Type..Form…Volts...Freq.....Ser. No….Spec…Last pat. date  Yr. got-inv.No.
 
1898   10”     S        UI      F3      115      60       19304       -       5/27/90   07-276    6-wing, nickeled blade

1898   12”     T        UI      E5      104      60       22323       -       5/27/90   12-352    6-wing, nickeled blade
 
1899   12”     T        UI      E7      104      60       33589       -       5/27/90   16-372    small open ring cage

1899   12”     T        UI      E7     104       60       35065       -       5/27/90    03-88     w/new ’98 cage but have original
 
1899   12”     T        UI      E7     115       60       37449       -       5/27/90    02-63    

1899   12”     S        UI      F4      104      60       39842       -       5/27/90   13-365  

1899   12”     S        UI      F       115       60       78119    3725    5/27/90    05-194     1901 model yr. ser. no.
  
1900   12”     S        UI      F9     104       60       46976    12721   5/27/90   07-246     from John Fetner, thick struts
 
1900   12”     T        UI      E9     104       60       48120    12733   5/27/90    04-133   
 
1900   12”     S        UI      F9     104       60      181508       -       6/25/01    03-116     (1900 model w/1904 ser. no.)

1901   12”     T        AD      A    108/115   60       78841    17231   7/31/00   11-335     eBay from Wrefakis

1901   16”     S        AA      A    108/115   60       94335    17258   7/31/00   08-282   

1902   12”     S        AB      B    100/115   60      107623   30042   6/25/01   06-216     from Jack Johnston
 
1902   12”     T        AD      B    100/115   60      112293      -        6/25/01   01-30       from Walker McVea
 
1903   12”     T        AD      C    100/115   60      148703      -        6/25/01   11-344     from Rene (all early features, 4 struts, cast hub, full rib).
 
1904   12”     T        AK      D    100/115   60      201873      -        6/25/01   07-241     from Mark Stillman

1905   12”     T         -        -     100/115  60       217657      -        6/25/01    01-41    
 

-Cages on 1900-1901 are wrapped, all others are pierced.
-All fans have cast hub other than the 1904 and 1905 which have stamped hub.
 
 
 
Some interesting details here:
 
1. Two 1900 stick mounts but look at the second one and how high the serial number is. This fan is typical in all ways of a 1900 model yet the tag has a last patent date of 6-25-1901. Why? Was this pancake assembled and sold much later than 1900? Was it rebuilt by GE and given a new motor tag? The serial number is in the 1904 range according to Don Eckerson's survey. All other of these motors serial numbers are within Don's survey range for the year given.
 
2. It looks like one could order an 1899 model for either 104 or 115 volts. Maybe other years like 1900 were also available in both voltages?
 
3. What is the "SPEC. NO. and what significance does it have? Some motor tags have SPEC stanmped into the tag with no number afterwards while other tags do not have the word SPEC on them.
 
4. Somewhere I heard that struts on the 1900 were beefed up from the somewhat thin ones used in 1899 but my 1900s all had the same struts as my 1899s. That is until I got this new 1900 from John. The struts are the same width as the other 1899 and 1900s I have but are considerable thicker material. .094" vs .066" thick. Note that the rear ring on the 1899 cage is the same thickness wire as the front ring while, in 1900, the rear ring wire was made much thicker than the front ring. 1900 struts do have a significant difference in that they have a bend to accomodate the larger thickness of the rear ring. An 1899 strut looks just like a 1900 but the bend in the 1899 strut will only allow it to fit an 1899 cage. And then there's my new 1900 with the thicker struts. Such fun to be able to compare a lot of machines at the same time.
 
5. Trunnion motor tags for 1899 are 6 inch in length, 7 inches in length for 1900, and 7-3/4" in length for 1902. I don't have a 1901 or 1903 to check length but would guess they would be the longer 7-3/4". A little known detail. Now that Nick Loos is making pancake motor tags for 1899-1903 be sure to ask for the right length. The mounting screw holes will be located differently on the three years so you won't be able to use a wrong year tag on a fan from 1899-1902.
 
 
6. Below is a photo of how John Fetner secured the rotor on the pancake I just received from him. This is one way to keep the motor shaft in the forward position. Another way I've used is to get a small set screw collar and slip it over the motor shaft and set the screw on the flat on the shaft. The reason the shaft has to be secured during shipping is so that the heavy rotor won't tend to move front to rear, etc. and possibly (probably!) break the motor casting. John also used a rubber fan base foot to slip over the shaft before clamping into position with the small hose clamp. Note that the brass oil return collar on all pancakes after 1899 has been removed before the clamp was put on. Don't let someone ship you a GE pancake without securing the rotor/shaft to the front of the motor.
 
Steve
Last edited on Fri Sep 28th, 2007 09:18 pm by Steve Stephens



Last edited on Tue Jun 6th, 2017 06:00 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Tue Jun 6th, 2017 01:26 pm
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Kim Frank
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Thanks Steve. I have added this info to the new survey. Just a couple of questions. Check the 1900 12 inch trunnion and see if it's not an E9 as opposed to F9. Can you confirm that the 1903 has four struts. Thanks.  BTW, my 1900 12" stick has a serial number out of sequence too....132920        Also, is the '05 you listed the one that has the full ribbed base?





Don't be shy, send your Pancake info so it can be included in the survey. I believe a lot of valuable information will start to show patterns. Just from Steve's list I find that 2 1900 12 inch stick mount fans have out of sequence serial numbers....







    When sending the info, 1903 was a crazy year. They went from 4 strut, ten wire cage, cast brass hub blade, full ribbed base to 3 struts, 8 or 10 wire guard, cast or stamped brass blade hub, full rib base to 3 struts, 8 or 10 wire cage, cast or brass blade hub, and half ribbed base. Those 3 variants are found in the 12" and 16" trunnion mount and the 12 inch sticks. Please clarify those characteristics when listing your 1903 Form C fans. I may contact you privately for more info, such as switch mounting method, etc.



    The 1904 early models mirror the late 1903 models. The only difference is the form letter designation from C to D. The motor tags are still the large brass tags. Later 1904 models begin to use the smaller np3184 motor tags. Please include which size tag in your listing.





    1906 was a transitional year too. Motor housings went from the earlier, more stylish ones to the completely smooth motors. Struts changed too, from brass to steel, then from the style seen on all early cakes, where the cage is held by u shaped clamping, to the plainer struts where the cage is held by means of a bevel head screw. Please note these differences when sending your list.

    Also, list anything that seems unusual, like a shorter than normal oil return on 1906-07 stick mount fans, or a 1905 fan with a full ribbed base.



Thanks everyone. Kim






Last edited on Tue Jun 6th, 2017 09:54 pm by Kim Frank

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 Posted: Tue Jun 6th, 2017 06:05 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Kim Frank wrote: Thanks Steve. I have added this info to the new survey. Just a couple of questions. Check the 1900 12 inch trunnion and see if it's not an E9 as opposed to F9. Can you confirm that the 1903 has four struts. Thanks.  BTW, my 1900 12" stick has a serial number out of sequence too....132920        Also, is the '05 you listed the one that has the full ribbed base?


Kim, the 1900 trunnion is Form E9 (I made a typo) and the 1903 has all early features incl. 4 struts and cast hub.   The 1905 is the usual one with half ribbed base just like a 1904.  Did you have photos in your post immediately above this one?  There are large areas between paragraphs but I don't see any evidence of any photos.

Last edited on Tue Jun 6th, 2017 06:08 pm by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Tue Jun 6th, 2017 09:55 pm
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Kim Frank
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I don't know what was going on with that. I cleaned it up a bit, so it reads easier. Didn't you have an '05 with all the features of an '03 or was that someone else?

Last edited on Tue Jun 6th, 2017 09:56 pm by Kim Frank

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 Posted: Tue Jun 6th, 2017 10:35 pm
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Steve Stephens
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That fan you are thinking of sold on eBay and there was a big discussion as to what year it was or why it existed.   If I remember with I felt that some early fully ribbed bases were made into stick pancakes in 1905 or, maybe and if the base for the stick was different than for the trunnion, GE used the old 1903 style pattern to cast bases for the very low production 1905 stick mount.  Is this the base where the cardboard cover had to be cut down some to fit?  Or they may have been using up old 1903 stock for a special order for 1905 stick pancakes.   I've never paid much attention to the post 1902 sticks as I find them unattractive.   Here's that fan:





















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 Posted: Wed Jun 7th, 2017 04:25 pm
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Ron Jeter
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PANCAKE SURVEY:

1. TYPE-AB --- FORM C --- VOLTS 100/115 --- CYCLES 60 --- No. 151404 --- Stick Mount --- Cast Hub --- 4 Blade --- 4 Strut --- Struts are in a + Pattern --- 10 Wire Pierce Brass Guard.

2. TYPE-UI ---FORM F --- VOLTS 110 (110 Stamped over 220) ---CYCLES 60 ---No. 61476 --- Stick Mount --- Cast Hub --- 4 Blade ---
    4 Strut --- Struts are in an X Pattern --- 10 Wire Wrapped Brass Guard.

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 Posted: Wed Jun 7th, 2017 05:30 pm
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Kim Frank
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Thank you Ron.


Steve, That is the fan I was wondering about. It is a 1st variant 1903 solid frame base and motor, with four struts and full ribbed base. What is "wrong" with it, by current criteria for that year and model fan, is it has a thumb screw and set screw in the neck of the base (1905), a 4 wing stamped brass hub blade(3rd variant 1903-1908) and an eight wire wrapped ring guard( depending on views, either 1904-1908...or only after 1908) If in fact it was put out for sale as a 1905 fan, then the base and strut number are the only non conforming characteristics. I have added that fan to the survey.  Thanks.


Send in your info. So far, we've had seven collectors send in their information totaling 25 fans. I have gathered the info on another 18 fans from Ebay, and will be adding my 70 odd fans to the mix. I appreciate everyone's help so far. 

Once I have enough information, I plan on putting together a "Everything you wanted to know about Pancakes but was afraid to ask" guide, showing pictures of the models of fans, year by year, the common characteristics for each model, and the uncommon things seen on the fans. The serial numbers associated with the model years will be listed and we'll see if certain models of fans fall into s/n clusters. In order to do this, I will need as much fan information as you all can provide.

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 Posted: Wed Jun 14th, 2017 01:32 am
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Ron Jeter
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Hey Kim: How many Pancakes been turned-in for the survey?

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 Posted: Wed Jun 14th, 2017 01:17 pm
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Kim Frank
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Right now I have data on 165 Pancakes and motors. Not getting much input from collectors yet, with only ten reporting so for. Most of the data is from the fans in the museum, my collection, Ebay fans, and past posts here on the website. With what I have so far, I'm starting to see trends. I also discovered another pair of consecutive serial numbers on two 1904 12 inch trunnions in my collection that I didn't know about....duh.


Keep the information coming in and tell me about anything unusual that you observe about your fans. No detail is too small to include. Also, if your tag has SPEC. numbers, tell me about them. Feel free to post the info here as it will help keep the thread from getting buried, or you can email or PM me with it.
Thanks everyone....Kim

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 Posted: Wed Jun 14th, 2017 10:18 pm
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Gerry Fisher
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Kim -  I have info on my two GE pancakes, along with multiple pictures of each.  Not sure how to send the photos easily through here.  Can you send me your email address?
Gerry Fisher (gdenefisher@aol.com)



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 Posted: Thu Jun 15th, 2017 12:16 pm
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Kim Frank
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Gerry, email is Kim@Fanimation or kmfrank8@bellsouth.net  Thank you.


Has anyone ran across a Pancake with steel pizza slice wings instead of brass?

Last edited on Thu Jun 15th, 2017 12:18 pm by Kim Frank

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 02:27 am
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Larry Miceli
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Here are the numbers on my '07 GE Pancake.It should be familiar to you since we put back it together in your shop in Chiefland! 
1907, 12” ,  Trunnion, no form letter, 100/115 volts,  60 cyc, serial no. 304348
3 struts and 4 wings made by Rich Becher on original hub, new cage made by Ted Kaczor.
This is my only remaining pancake... right now that is!


Attached Image (viewed 1267 times):

IMG_3411.JPG

Last edited on Fri Jun 16th, 2017 03:41 am by Larry Miceli

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 02:28 am
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Larry Miceli
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.

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IMG_3413.JPG

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 04:43 am
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Kim,A little meaningless info to me of 10 mostly complete GEs.                                                            
All are AC, 60 cycle, 12", GE badged and 4 wing, &  all trunions have wing bolts.  Years ? 
First seven are back switches and the last three are base switches.
1.  No. 49221,  UI  E9, 104 volts, trunion, Spec No. 12732, 4 struts square pattern.
2.  No. 50354,  UI  E9, 104 volts, trunion, Spec No. 12733, 4 struts square, wrapped cage.
3.  No. 83923,  AB A, 108-115 volts, stick, Spec No. 17222, 4 struts diamond pattern, pierced cage.  
4.  No. 111662,  AB B, 100-115 volts, stick, 4 struts diamond.
5.  No. 142750, AD B, 110-115 volts, trunion, 4 struts diamond, pierced cage.
6.  No. 144379, AB B, 110-115 volts, stick, 4 struts diamond, pierced cage.
7.  Tag missing, trunion, 4 struts, square.
All above with cast hubs---below with stamped hubs.
8. No. 172067, AK C, 100-115 volts, trunion, 3 struts, wrapped cage.
9. No.189516, AB D,  100-115 volts, trunion, 3 struts, pierced cage.
10. No.217129 (no type or form), 100-115 volts, trunion, 3 struts, pierced cage.

Please tell me that this wasn't a complete waste of time with these ge's.   :hammer:

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 12:44 pm
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Kim Frank
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Bill,  you don't have thank me, but I know you really want to, for giving you that excuse to go down into your basement and actually get some hands-on with real fans. Just in the amount of time you spent gathering this information you have probably noticed a change in your giddy up....Like wanting to pound down a Budweiser breakfast instead of that morning infusion of Geritol, watching the Military Channel in your underwear instead of wearing Depends and boohooing while viewing a HallMark movie. Maybe chasing that young Bride of yours around the house, instead of sitting alone on the front porch worrying about breaking a hip. You know what I'm talking about.......I really do appreciate it Bill and I promise to remind you each day in an email, that you have already send me this information.....

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 01:54 pm
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Bill Hoehn
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Kim,

On topic---who is going to do a survey of the more interesting later ge's?

Actually I prefer Hadacol to Geritol.  They even tell me which end is on top and have 12% alcohol (as a preservative) :wondering:!!!

An still chasing Laverne after about 65 years, but it's getting slower with the cane, walker and stair-lift and forgetting what for!

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 01:55 pm
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Bill Hoehn
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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 01:56 pm
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Bill Hoehn
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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 02:42 pm
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Chris A. Campbell
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I am curious as to why serial numbers would be out of sequence.

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 Posted: Fri Jun 16th, 2017 03:52 pm
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Kim Frank
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Hadacol.....I wonder if I could use it as a mixer............


Bill, I'm not sure who is going to take over the more interesting GE's, but I have heard a couple of names thrown around. I think Jon Brown might be the guy.....


Chris, your guess is as good as any. On the fans thru 1904, we use the guide lines of type and form for each year, along with the fans characteristics, and the serial numbers as given to us by previous keepers of the survey to determine a fan's vintage. For example, a type AB form B with a serial number between 100,000 and 146500 would tell me that that fan is a 1902 12 inch solid/swivel frame (stick)fan. It would have four brass struts, a 10 wire pierced guard, a cast brass hub blade with four wings. It would be a five speed motor with the switch in the rear cover cap. The voltage for that fan would most likely be 100/115v 60 cycles. It would have a hole in the rear cover at 9 o'clock. If a serial number falls outside of those perimeters, then we say it's 'out of sequence". It has everything we look at to determine what year it is, but the number doesn't jive. To date, I see two '98 fans, six '99 fans, two 1900 fans, one 1902 fan, two 1904 fans, and one 1905 fan with numbers that are out of sequence.

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 Posted: Sun Jun 18th, 2017 12:38 am
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Chris Benbow
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Here are a few more....
Year.       Blade.    Frame.    Type.    Form.   Volts.          Cycles.    Serial No.    Spec No..

1899        12          T               UI        E7        104              60            37547           -----

1900        12          S               UI        F9        104              60            49168          12721

1901        12          T               AD       A          100/108       60            86196          12730

1902        12          T               AD       B          100/115       60          131037           blank

1903        12          S               AB       C          100/115       60          150935
          (4 struts, cast hub, 10 wire/pinned, full flute)

1906        12          T                                        100/115       60          254196 

1907        12          T                                        100/115       60          294972

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 Posted: Mon Jun 19th, 2017 01:16 pm
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Kim Frank
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Got them entered Chris. Thanks





I see that several collectors have a lot of cakes. If anyone is wondering how many it would take to make a complete collection of A/C desk fans, here is what I believe it would require....





1894  (1)    10" Lynn

1895  (2)    10" Lynn     12"Lynn

1896  (2)    10" Lynn D  12" T E2

1897  (2)    10" Stick F   12" T E3

1898  (3)    10" S  F       12" T E5  14" S G

1899  (3)    12" S F4      12" T E7  14" S G2 (All fans are now 4 bladed)

1900  (4)    12" S F        12"T E9   14" S G4   16" T C

1901  (4)    12" S AB     12"T AD   14" S AB   16" S AA

1902  (3)    12" S AB     12"T AD   16" S AA

1903  (9)    12" S AB     12"T AD/AK    16" T AD/AK (3 variants per model)

1904  (6)    12" S AB     12"T AK   16"T AK   (2 variants per model)

1905  (3)    12" S          12"T        16" T

1906  (6)    12" S          12" T       16" T       (2 variants per model)

1907  (3)    12" S          12" T       16" T

1908  (3)    12" S          12" T       16" T





I think that covers it. 54 fans total. Now you can add in the CGE and BTH badged fans. Plus the "oddball" fans. Then start adding the 1899-1903 Bracket fans in 12 and 16 inch. Form K and Type AE for 12" and Form A or B and Type AE(?) for 16 inch. Of course, don't forget the D/C desk fans, and all of the exhaust fans and sewing machine motors using Cake motors. You can have a nice collection with just the early GE's. Keep the numbers coming.  We have 206 fans surveyed so far. I know there are a ton more out there. Thanks, Kim





Last edited on Mon Jun 19th, 2017 02:16 pm by Kim Frank

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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 02:20 am
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Tim Marks
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Some of mine:

Year.       Blade.    Frame.    Type.    Form.   Volts.          Cycles.    Serial No.    Spec No..
1899        12          T               UI        E7        115              60            37443           -----
1901        14          S               AB       A          100/108       60            97921          17251
1902        12          T               AD       B          100/115       60          133252           blank


I also have an 1897, 1900 and 1903 in my collection right now but will add them later. Thanks again for your efforts, Kim.

Last edited on Tue Jun 20th, 2017 02:22 am by Tim Marks

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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 11:43 am
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Randy Halbert
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I'll reply one fan at a time.  
1900 12" Trunion, 10 wire wrapped, 4 strut in "X" pattern, cast hub, Type UI, Form E, 104V, Serial-56482, Spec-12734.

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Randy Halbert
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04 12" Tunion, 8 wire wrapped, 3 strut, stamped hub, Type AK, Form D,100/115V, Serial-188470, Half ribbed base

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Kim Frank
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Thank you Tim.


Thank you Randy.

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Randy Halbert
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03 12" Trunion, 8 wire pierced, 4 strut in "+" pattern, stamped hub, Type AD, Form C, 100/115V, Serial-153458, Full ribbed base.
All mine are 60 cycles.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 12:57 pm
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Randy Halbert
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My last one.03 12" Trunion, 8 wire wrapped, 4 strut in "+" pattern, cast hub, Type AD, Form C, 100/115V, Serial-159599, Full ribbed base.

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Don Tener
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Randy Halbert wrote: My last one.03 12" Trunion, 8 wire wrapped, 4 strut in "+" pattern, cast hub, Type AD, Form C, 100/115V, Serial-159599, Full ribbed base.
Is that your ceiling fan Randy? That is really cool.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 20th, 2017 08:09 pm
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Randy Halbert
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Yes, that's the one hanging from my ceiling in the hall.  

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Randy Halbert
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pic

Attached Image (viewed 957 times):

IMG_1399.JPG

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Don Tener
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That fan really look's great. First one I saw hanging upside down.

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Tim Marks
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Year.       Blade.    Frame.    Type.    Form.   Volts.          Cycles.    Serial No.    Spec No..
1897        12          T               UI        E3        110              60           12144           -----


This example has a ground down voltage and cycle spec with the 110 and 60 stamped in place. I cannot make out the original spec. Perhaps a re-wind, perhaps a mistake during original manufacturing. I will say that the stator coils look exactly like any other factory original cake I've seen so if it was re-wound, its more likely that the whole stator was just swapped out.




Last edited on Wed Jun 21st, 2017 05:24 pm by Tim Marks

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Kim Frank
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Good information. Does it have a 2 speed switch? Are the cage and the struts integrated? The reason I ask is the s/n places it in 1896.....Thanks.

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Stephen Chew
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All are 12" and 60 cycles

01 - Stick-Form A -Type AB- Volts 108/115 Serial #50424 Spec.17222 - Cast hub -10 Wire pierce 4 Struts +

03- Trunion -Form C- Type AD- Volts 100/115 Serial #149461
cast hub - 10 Wire pierce 4 Struts + Full rib

03- Trunion -Form C- Type AK- Volts 100/115 Serial #171724
stamped hub -8 Wire wrapped 3 Struts Full rib

04- Trunion -Form D- Type AK- Volts 100/115 Serial #204740
Stamped hub-8 Wire pierce 3 Struts Half rib

04- Trunion -Form D- Type AK- Volts 100/115 Serial #202738
Stamped hub-8 Wire wrapped 3 Struts Half Rib

06- Trunion - Volt 100/115 Serial #261099 Stamped hub 8 Wire pierce 3 Steel Struts

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 Posted: Fri Jun 23rd, 2017 01:20 pm
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Kim Frank
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A quick update......247 fans reported. Getting a lot of good information. For example, 1908 12 inch trunnions with serial numbers up to 324457 are 100/115v 60 cycle. Two examples with serial numbers of 324463 and 324658 are 190/220v 60 cycle. The conclusion looks to be 1908 12 inch trunnion fans with serial numbers before 324460 are the lesser voltage and after 324460 are the higher voltage. Then we have an example 324582 with the lesser voltage.....So much for an easy conclusion. Keep the information coming. I really appreciate everyone's effort....Now, just need to get Chad, Ted, Carlton, and Doc to respond...Rumor is that they have the world's supply of remaining Pancakes... 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 19th, 2017 12:54 pm
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Kim Frank
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Quick update on the survey. I was able to get the info on 16 more fans while at Fan Fair, bringing the total to 263 fans so far. I appreciate everyones help with this and if you haven't sent me your info, please do. An interesting tidbit so far is that 19.4% of cages on fans from 1903 and after have wrapped rear rings. That's one in five fans. Some more interesting stuff is of the six 1897 fans surveyed, half have out of sequence(oos) s/n's. Five of the eight '98's surveyed have out of sequence numbers, and eight of twenty nine 1899's have out of sequence numbers. Keep the info coming....Thanks

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Gary Buchanan
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1903-12" Trunion full rib,Type AD Form C,S/N 151818spec,100/115V,125/140 cycle,4 struts Pierced cage,Stamped Hub Ted Kazor blade and cage 10 wire,Brass wing bolts.

1901-12" Stick,Type AD Form A,S/N96194 spec 17231,108/115Volt,60 cycles 4struts,10 wire cage pierced,cast hub,brass wing bolts

1905-12"1/2 rib trunion,small badge no type or form,S/N 207600,100/115V 60 cycle,3 struts 8 wire pierced cage,stamped hub,Brass wing bolts

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