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GE Collar Oscillator Restoration  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Fri Jun 23rd, 2017 11:33 pm
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David Hoatson
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I bought a GE Collar Oscillator from a member a while back and figured it was time to crack her open. 
First, I made a power cord and gave it a test. I checked ohm across the plug in all three speeds and got reasonable readings, so I plugged it in. It started, ran smoothly in all speeds, and oscillated great. Perfect. 

It had a temporary headwire, so I marked the 3 wires, cut them, and took ohm readings. A little odd: 

AB 198.1
BC 189.3
AC 44.2

Odd that the two lower ones don't add up to the high one. I zeroed the ohmmeter, too. 

I took off the back of the motor, removed the rotor, took the four screws off the front that hold the stator coil in, then gradually punched the stator out from the front, using a punch and hammer. 



























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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 02:04 am
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Ryan Blazei
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That's a neat fan, not very common. About the stator, I ohmed an emerson 16666 and had weird, results as well, bc 146
ac 136
ab 12
but it runs fine. 

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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 01:45 pm
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David Hoatson
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I was thinking. A bad solder connection where the temporary headwire attaches to the stator old headwire (wire B) would add resistance to the common wire (B), making the two lowest readings (AB & BC) both a bit high, but not affecing the highest reading (AC: both coils in serial).
So, replacing the headwire using clean solder connections should make the coil resistances add up better. 

When soldering to an old wire, first take the time to get every strand of old copper wire shiny on all sides so the solder will flow and connect well. I use 600 grit sandpaper to remove old laquer and corrosion from the wire. 

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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:12 pm
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David Hoatson
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I trimmed off the old headwire. 




And connected a new headwire - OTR high flex. 














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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:17 pm
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David Hoatson
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The front has a gear case
















Setscrew holds axle in place:



Pull axle out:







Last edited on Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:19 pm by David Hoatson

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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:23 pm
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David Hoatson
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There is a pin that holds the bottom section together:



Punch the pin out:





Then pull the upper section off:






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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:31 pm
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David Hoatson
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Gear and lever



Engages bevel gear in base:





Collar unscrews:










Pull gear and clutch plate off










Axle for the bevel gear.  Tightening the collar presses the bevel gear down against the base, starting the oscillation. 





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 Posted: Sat Jun 24th, 2017 09:37 pm
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David Hoatson
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Pivot comes off:








Switch in base:












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 Posted: Sun Jun 25th, 2017 12:59 am
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Tim Marks
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AB- 190
BC- 190
CA- 45

The B phase has the higher resistance coils in it. That's how to read these types of motors.

Think of it this way: C-A is about 22.5 ohms each. That makes the B phase about 167.5ohms total.

T

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 Posted: Sun Jun 25th, 2017 01:20 am
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David Hoatson
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Tim Marks wrote: AB- 190
BC- 190
CA- 45

The B phase has the higher resistance coils in it. That's how to read these types of motors.

Think of it this way: C-A is about 22.5 ohms each. That makes the B phase about 167.5ohms total.

T
Thanks

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 Posted: Mon Jul 10th, 2017 11:38 pm
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David Hoatson
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I've got the parts cleaned up and I began reassembly. 




























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 Posted: Mon Jul 10th, 2017 11:44 pm
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Steve Stephens
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That has to be the most bizarre fan construction I have seen but appreciate the detailed photos you posted David.   I've never had a collar oscillator.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 12:00 am
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David Hoatson
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GE did a great job hiding the ugly oscillator parts. This fan was from a not-so-distant time when beauty, form, function, and the strength to last hundreds of years was more important than squeezing the last penny of profit from a design.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 12:09 am
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David Hoatson
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..

Attached Image (viewed 714 times):

IMG_4178.JPG

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 12:22 am
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Lucas Beshara
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Awesome tutorial David!!!  
I hope to use this on a collar oscillator, if I am lucky enough to come across one:up:

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 12:32 am
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Vic Valencheck
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Nice job in showing the tear down of your fan. Lots of pieces and parts. That's the kind of fan I would like to restore sometime. Like to see it when it's finished. 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 03:16 am
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David Hoatson
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Thanks for the encouraging words. I have learned to buy fans that are complete and have good paint, if possible. Then spend hours cleaning the parts and the paint. In my opinion, it is rare to see a truly inspiring fan that has been repainted. It is necessary sometimes, though.my advice - try to save the original paint. 
This is a good example of an old fan with a good soul. 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 03:29 am
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Chad Shapiro
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David Hoatson wrote:  In my opinion, it is rare to see a truly inspiring fan that has been repainted. 
Amen to that!
Nice work on this conservation!

Last edited on Tue Jul 11th, 2017 03:32 am by Chad Shapiro

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 05:17 am
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Chris Kelly
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i have a collar oscillator and its one of my favorites

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 10:00 am
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Lane Shirey
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Great turorial David! 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 01:57 pm
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Bill Arfmann
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:clap:Thank you very much for sharing in this level of detail, David.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 02:16 pm
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David Foster
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This should be submitted for our magazine so those that don't visit the forums can see this. 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 02:24 pm
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David Hoatson
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I like to understand the inner workings. Hopefully this documentation will help someone restoring their fan. 

The collar oscillator has some odd features. Like the oil drain back in the front bearing, the felt pad on one gear, and two oiling holes in the steel/bronze gear. These would make sense if a thin oil was used, but the gearbox isn't sealed, can't hold oil, and has no way of adding oil. There is a wick oiler at the rear bearing, but nothing at the front. It seems that grease is the only lube that would work. I've seen similar mysteries on other fans. Many oscillator gearboxes were packed with grease, but had spiral grooves in the output shaft that would push escaping liquid back up into the gearbox. 


When I took it apart, some of the old grease had turned into a brown wax. I've seen this in a lot of old fans. The grease on some of the gears seemed rather good. Maybe someone serviced the fan, adding new grease without taking the time to remove the old hard grease. This brings up a philosophical question: when restoring a fan, should some of the original grease that does not affect operation be untouched? Kinda like petroleum patina?


I suspect that the issue is that early 1900's grease may have had issues with less viscous oils separating out of the more waxy base of the grease.  Modern grease doesn't seperate and is waterproof. Anybody know?

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 04:45 pm
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Charlie Forster
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Good job and good pictures David

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 05:37 pm
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David Hoatson
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David Foster wrote: This should be submitted for our magazine so those that don't visit the forums can see this. 
But what if I get it all done and it bursts into flames? I guess it would make a good cover shot. 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 11th, 2017 06:36 pm
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David Foster
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That would be a heck of a cover. How are your photoshop skills?0

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 Posted: Sat Jul 15th, 2017 12:15 am
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David Hoatson
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I got most of the stump together. More details on my Chestertown Electric Facebook page. 
Using studs to pull the stator coil into the housing:



Headwire-to-switch connections - loops formed and soldered:




Top of switch:




Switch installed:












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 Posted: Sun Jul 16th, 2017 01:32 pm
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Kevin Massey
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Can you post a video when the fan is complete and running? You always do a great job on restore info. Keep up the good work.

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 Posted: Sun Jul 16th, 2017 02:12 pm
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David Hoatson
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Sure, I'll do a video when done. 

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 Posted: Sun Jul 16th, 2017 02:51 pm
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Kevin Massey
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Thank you.

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 Posted: Sun Jul 16th, 2017 06:32 pm
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Karolyn Badon
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I have learned a great deal from this post. My collar oscillator is missing one gear. 
Someday I will find it. 
Thank you. 👍🏻

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 12:58 pm
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Lucas Beshara
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Just a note on this fan David.  Your switch is missing some insulation. It can ground out on the base as it is. I recently ran into this same issue with a brass bell GE. The way I reinsulated was with Jb weld. I wrapped the existing insulation on the switch with painters tape and the tape spanned to where the insulation would have originally been. Then filled that void with the Jb weld and hung it upside down to dry overnight. I'll post some pics when I can. As a stop gap you can use electrical tape where the bare switch could contact the base:up:

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 05:29 pm
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Bill Arfmann
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Not certain that i am picturing what you mean, Lucas.  Would you want to show pictures, and provide more of an explanation-- where his fan might ground out.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 08:06 pm
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Lucas Beshara
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So this is where the power can energize the base.  When the bare metal on the switch touches the bare metal base.  Granted its probably floating but an unsuspecting person could pull or push the switch to contact the base.  And there would probably have to be unforeseen circumstances to find ground...  Like you are standing outside barefoot and have your hand on the base when it energizes.  Just saying it could happen.


Below is where the insulation would have originally gone to.  That would have eliminated the ability of electricity to find its way into the base.





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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 09:25 pm
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David Hoatson
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Lucas Beshara wrote: So this is where the power can energize the base.  When the bare metal on the switch touches the bare metal base.  Granted its probably floating but an unsuspecting person could pull or push the switch to contact the base.  And there would probably have to be unforeseen circumstances to find ground...  Like you are standing outside barefoot and have your hand on the base when it energizes.  Just saying it could happen.


Below is where the insulation would have originally gone to.  That would have eliminated the ability of electricity to find its way into the base.




Thanks. I saw a chip but didn't know how far down it went.  

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 10:10 pm
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Lucas Beshara
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Here is how I fixed mine

Then feed liquid Jb weld in there and let it dry overnight in this position. Here is the result






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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 10:51 pm
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David Hoatson
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Nice

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 11:10 pm
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Christopher Harding
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Very educational, and fascinating! Thank you David, and also to Lucas. I have a fan with this issue and was trying to think of a good solution, Problem solved.

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 Posted: Tue Jul 18th, 2017 11:42 pm
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Lucas Beshara
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Glad to help fellas!  That's what it's all about....  saving and preserving these awesome pieces of industrial beauty

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 Posted: Tue Aug 1st, 2017 01:15 am
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David Hoatson
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The blade had a shake. Normally, a carefull physical alignment of any bent wings works, but this was out of ballance. So, I bought a Du-Bro model airplane propeller ballancing setup, an idea I saw in another thread. One wing was heavy, so I sanded its front surface until it ballanced. Worked wonders. Now it runs smoothly. 

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