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What paint do you use?  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2018 03:18 am
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Todd Adornato
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I did a search of the forum, but only got one or two hits.  I’d like to know what oil-based enamel paint you use on the housings and bases of your fans - now, I know some of you do powder coating, but I have a HVLP sprayer and would like to try a new paint.  My first and only project to date was with One Shot Lettering Enamel;  probably it’s just me, but I had a terrible time with orange peel.   I tried both mineral spirits and acetone to thin the paint, even to the point of trying 1:1, but the orange peel persisted. Even with wet sanding between coats. I used a Sherwin Williams oil-based primer to start with, and that came out considerably smoother than the One Shot. So I want to try a different oil-based enamel paint, and see if I have any better luck.  Perhaps SW All-Surface Enamel Oil-Base, but I wanted to check here first. 
Any recommendations?  Maker and line of paint?

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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2018 04:33 am
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Chris A. Campbell
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Since you have a hvlp skip the oil enamels and go straight for auto base/ clear urethane. Summit makes a good starting paint. PPG, Sherwin Williams, BASF make good paints. You can even go with a single stage.


I spray furniture with a hvlp and add flowtrol at a high psi but you will have better results with auto paints. Higher psi will give you a better finish but you loose material. Orange peel is a pressure issue. Runs are flow control. 

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Last edited on Thu Oct 11th, 2018 04:38 am by Chris A. Campbell

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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2018 09:40 am
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Todd Adornato
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Chris A. Campbell wrote: Orange peel is a pressure issue.


I thought orange peel was an issue of the paint being too thick.  Are you saying it’s because of the pressure being too low?

Beautiful paint there.   Is that before or after wet sanding / buffing?

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 Posted: Thu Oct 11th, 2018 12:42 pm
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Henry Carrera
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I get the same results as Chris with PPG single stage urethane thinned down to within an inch of its life. Gotta be careful with the runs but what a beautiful glass like finish. Just spray it and you're done. All of my fans were painted with an old Sears gun. I have HVLP now but haven't painted any fans in years.













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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 04:06 pm
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Todd Adornato
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Thanks for the comments, folks. I decided to try Summit’s urethane one-stage paints and see how that works out.

But it’s a bit of a sobering thought when the total cost of the paints and hardeners is more than the fan is worth. I keep telling myself it’s a learning experience!

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 06:58 pm
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Chris A. Campbell
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I added up the cost of primers, paint, clear, reducers, and activators. Figured the average cost per fan to be around same cost as 3-4 cans of spray paint.

You can get pint sized mixing cups and mix around 1-2 ounces of material

For sub 1 ounce mixes such repairs I use graduated pipets for mix ratios and small mouth rinse sized paper cups.

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 07:19 pm
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Todd Adornato
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Chris A. Campbell wrote: I added up the cost of primers, paint, clear, reducers, and activators. Figured the average cost per fan to be around same cost as 3-4 cans of spray paint.

You can get pint sized mixing cups and mix around 1-2 ounces of material

For sub 1 ounce mixes such repairs I use graduated pipets for mix ratios and small mouth rinse sized paper cups.


I assume you mean painting a number of fans black.  For my second job painting with a HVLP gun - and my first with urethane - I’m going to try a coppery metallic paint on a fairly denuded Emerson 2450, just for grins.  Doubt I’ll be painting any nice fans in that color, so the costs don’t get spread out ;)

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 07:31 pm
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Russ Huber
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Todd Adornato wrote:
It’s a bit of a sobering thought when the total cost of the paints and hardeners is more than the fan is worth.
You made a funny.  :D  Both fans were stripped to bare metal and refinished with Rustoleum appliance epoxy. 

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Last edited on Sun Oct 14th, 2018 07:32 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 07:39 pm
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William Dunlap
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I use;
Powder coat
Lacquer
Ordinary enamel
Base coat/ clear coat automotive
Occasionally single stage automotive.

I prefer powder coat as it most closely resembles original finishes like Japan. It is very easy to apply. The cost is minimal. Durability is through the roof. Toxicity is non existent. What more can I say?

I have fans in my place with all these finishes. The only thing I can say is that spray can lacquers don't hold up very long. The rest are fine as long as they are kept out of direct sunlight.

The lacquer I use is thinned and sprayed with a gun. It's designed for furniture and so far it has proven to be very durable.

Cheers,
Bill

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 07:44 pm
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Russ Huber
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The 12" on the left is Rustoleum appliance epoxy, the 16" on the right is factory enamel. 

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 08:14 pm
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Russ Huber
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Rustoleum appliance epoxy. The trick....you need at least a week of DRY warm weather to let the previous coats to dry. If you try to apply more coats to early the paint will bubble and lift. You need practice with nice even coats.


The boys with the more expensive automotive paints can pump em out faster.  

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fans 1 3310.jpg

Last edited on Sun Oct 14th, 2018 08:14 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sun Oct 14th, 2018 09:38 pm
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Henry Carrera
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Todd Adornato wrote:


Thanks for the comments, folks. I decided to try Summit’s urethane one-stage paints and see how that works out. But it’s a bit of a sobering thought when the total cost of the paints and hardeners is more than the fan is worth. I keep telling myself it’s a learning experience!

Keep your sealing surfaces clean and store your hardener in the fridge. I have 20 year old hardener that still works like it was just opened. :cool:

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2018 06:57 pm
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Russ Huber
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FWIW...I posted my Diehl and cake restoration photos of past for those that may not have the ability to afford automotive finishes and the equipment needed to apply them. Or powder coating services and application and oven equipment.


With patience and practice you can make your fan rock just as good as the people with the fancy stuff for well under a Ben Franklin. Don't be intimidated, just do it. The cool part about rattle can paint is if you screw up, remove the paint and do it again if necessary. Learn from your mistakes, but don't quit. :D 

BTW...that 12" 05 cake had no guard as was half buried in the dirt behind shed.  Never say die.  :clap:

Last edited on Mon Oct 15th, 2018 07:00 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Mon Oct 15th, 2018 07:26 pm
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Todd Adornato
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Thanks for the input, folks. It’s most helpful!

Russ, it’s good to know excellent results can be gotten with appliance paint :D

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 Posted: Tue Oct 16th, 2018 08:10 pm
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Patrick Ray
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I get really good results with a Harbor Freight paint gun and Rust-Oleum tractor enamel. Don't have pics to post right now buti restored a GE Quiet Blade and was blown away with how nice it layed out. I went to bare metal, primed, and sprayed.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 17th, 2018 10:10 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Russ Huber wrote: Rustoleum appliance epoxy. The trick....you need at least a week of DRY warm weather to let the previous coats to dry. If you try to apply more coats to early the paint will bubble and lift. You need practice with nice even coats.


The boys with the more expensive automotive paints can pump em out faster.  
That appliance epoxy looks great! The problem I have down here on the Gulf Coast is high humidity.

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2018 01:58 am
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Andrew Block
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Bake it. Get you an old oven somewhere and put it in your shed. I don't have an oven, but I have a "warming drawer" that maxes out at about 220 degrees and it works great. It's made for a sheet pan so its very wide, but not very tall. 

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2018 02:36 am
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Richard Daugird
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I’ve Been meaning to get one for a while. I bought a Powder Coat gun iand several colors of powder or year or two ago I never have gotten around to trying them out. Just like my 3-D printer that’s still in the box.

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2018 02:38 am
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Richard Daugird
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And yet I’m sitting in my garage sanding wire by wire the grill on a $50 Homart box fan I got from you!

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2018 02:42 am
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Todd Adornato
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I picked up a wall oven off CL a few months ago for $40. Still practically new, but the previous owner had overcooked something in it and got dried up sauce all over the sides and bottom. I guess he or she had more money than sense, because they hired a contractor to renovate the kitchen and replace the oven, and I got it from the contractor.

Four hours on self clean, and the oven was ready to go.

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 Posted: Thu Oct 18th, 2018 10:33 am
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Rick Powell
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There are some beautiful pristine paint jobs from fellow members but I prefer to repaint my fans exactly as they were done in the factory.  Has taken several years but the formula and methods that I have come up with to manufacture and apply the original Japanne paint is very satisfying. It takes more effort but I like that it original, all metal is stripped to bare metal the a coat of Japanne is applied, it’s baked for several hours in an old oven in the basement, after it cools a second coat is applied and baked again, when you are reassembling the fan there’s no worry of chipping the finish as it’s melted mineral and very hard.







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