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My restoration process of a 1928-1929 GE AOU AF2 fan from Spain  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2019 01:47 pm
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Chris Mueller
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Hi guys,
first of all thank you so much for all your help that got me started with the restoration of this old GE fan I found in a shed next to the atlantic ocean in Spain. I really appreciate that! I pretty much like the process of restoring this old fan as each part that I manage to take off reveals new issues. 


Condition before restoration:






Label glasblasted:













Cage taken off:






Bottom assembly:





Front assembly:






After using WD40 overnight and glasblasting the base I was able to get the bottom parts apart:















Unfortunately the wires coming out of the stator have been extremely dry and broke by almost looking at them. :shock:
At least there are no cables that disturb while trying to get the stator off... Hopefully I get the wires back in when the stator is out and free...  :wondering:





Next I will try to get the stator out off the body. Unfortunately your tip using a pvc pipe didn't work. The stator didn't move a micron. Do you have any other ideas or anything that I need to be aware of that can't be seen from the outside? Tomorrow I will try some mechanical pulling tools...

I am always happy about your comments or help.  :D

Chris

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 Posted: Thu Feb 28th, 2019 05:31 pm
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Sophie Crochet
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Good luck with your restoration. It looks like you have your work cut out for you.

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2019 08:57 am
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Chris Mueller
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Thanks Sophie!
Due to the fact that the stator is not moving at all using gentle forces I am wondering if it makes sense to remove it? What is your usual procedure with the stator? Do you remove it? How do you get it back inside after painting or rewinding? I am not sure but will the stator be pressed back in after that or does it need to fit smoothly?

But because of the broken headwire I don't have many choices... My next try would be to insert 4 long screws (UNF #10 x 3") from the back of the body into the stator and push it out while holding the body against a stopper. Hopefully that will work.

Best,
Chris

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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2019 10:41 am
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Lane Shirey
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Your best bet to remove the stator is to find a drift punch ( long punch with a flat tip)  then find a bench vise and open it up so it just catches the motor housing and not the stator.  You’re not clamping it, just bridging the housing across it.  

Then use the drift punch.  Insert into the 4 holes that the screws went through to hold the stator in place. Insert it through one hole and hit with a hammer. Then go to the opposite hole and do the same.  You’re trying to “walk” the stator out of the housing. It’ll only move 1/16 “ or so per hit, so be patient.  Keep hitting on alternate sides and it should slowly come out.  Sometimes it helps to dribble a little penetrating oil around the housing at that joint.  Just keep it off of the coils.  


Be very careful not to hit the coils with the drift punch.  Use a flashlight to make absolutely certain that you know where the tip is before you hit it with the hammer.  Also, place the punch tip just to the side of the threaded screw holes that are in the stator. Be careful not to mess up those threads, or it’ll need to be retapped before assembly. I aim the punch toward the housing and not toward the coils so if it slips I won’t do damage. 


Be sure to push in the head wire as the stator comes out or you risk ripping them out of the coils


I’ve never had to do it, but some have found success in placing the motor in the freezer overnight then heating the motor housing with a heat gun to expand it a tiny bit.  


The headwire on those pass through the opening in the stator. It’s best to replace it on the side it originally connected to and replace it right to the coil wires.  If the insulation is that brittle, it’s also compromised where it goes through the stator.  If it’s a 2 wire headwire, then the connections of the conductors doesn’t matter, but if a 3 wire you should mark where they went.  To remove the part that goes through the stator,  very carefully remove the tape covering the splices. Usually heating the old tape with a heat gun will soften it, then crush it with a pliers and it’ll peel right off.  Then cut the headwire off at each splice point. At that point you should be able to pull out the old wire with a pair of pliers.  Blow any remaining debris out of the opening to prepare it for the new wire.  Just make sure your new headwire is small enough to fit through the opening.  


It’s a shame you’re not located in the US as parts are readily available for those GE fans.  I don’t know if he ships internationally, but Chad Baker of antiquefanparts,com has very good headwire that will fit through that stator opening. He might have a motor housing and the missing oscillator parts.  



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 Posted: Fri Mar 1st, 2019 11:11 am
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David Kilnapp
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Great advice Lane. Right on the money! Wow, this poor fan has seen some HARD service in its life!

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 Posted: Sat Mar 2nd, 2019 09:35 am
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Lane Shirey
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Poor old girl!  I hope he’s able to get it going.  It sure has led a hard life. 

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 Posted: Mon Mar 4th, 2019 02:16 pm
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Chris Mueller
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Lane, thanks for your detailed help! I thought of your method but was unsure if I may break stuff that's located somewhere and cannot be seen from the outside. 
I was as gentle as possible with the hammer and I got the stator out of the body with minor deformations on the flange area of the threaded inserts. Next I will try to repair the headwire according to your hints and glasblast all the parts.

I found a "Graybar oscillating fan AOU AF2" that seems to have a least the parts intact that I need for my repair. Do you know if it will be identical in construction?

Here are some photos from today:
















Best,

Chris


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 Posted: Mon Mar 4th, 2019 11:53 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Graybar never made fans and GE was one of their suppliers.  If it’s also a stamped steel fan of similar construction, it’s likely it has the parts you need.  

Looks like you’re making good progress.  Just don’t bend those stator coil wires too much. They’re very fine and also brittle.  Also keep in mind that just beyond where they’re currently soldered, they have lacquer insulation on them.  So if you solder further back than the original connection point, be sure the lacquer is removed or you won’t make a good solder connection.  


Also take notes and pictures where the original splices are located and try to position yours in exactly the same spot. Otherwise they may interfere when you put the stator back in.  


Heat shrink tubing works very well when you attach the headwire and they take up less room than the friction tape.  Never use vinyl electrical tape on a motor. 

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 Posted: Mon Mar 4th, 2019 11:57 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Also if the Graybar motor housing is better than yours, I’d consider using it.  You may have distorted the existing housing trying to use a pipe on a sheet metal housing.  In that case the bearings may not align as they should. 

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 Posted: Tue Mar 5th, 2019 04:01 am
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Cory Baughn
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When stator wires are that brittle, or almost every fan I do brittle or not, I always carefully solder my head wire to the stator wires after carefully scrapping them clean with a utility knife, get down to where the wires are shiny again, and then shrink wrap after soldering, and finally use JB Quik and spread it all over where the brittle wires are and glue them to the windings, that way all your left with is new head wire coming out and no risk of flexing and breaking them. Just make sure you have continuity before JB Welding all around them. It takes away a lot of the worry of breaking the wires even with daily use. 
Also, speed coils that get new wire coming out of them I do the same process, solder then shrink wrap then JB weld them down, and finally spray the coil with black Dolph's reinsulating spray varnish. Use the Dolph's on stators too, it is some amazing stuff. The best insulating varnish I think most of us have found, and the fact you can get it in black means no having to go over the red varnish of other brands with black paint to hide stator. 

Last edited on Tue Mar 5th, 2019 04:06 am by Cory Baughn

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 Posted: Tue Mar 5th, 2019 02:23 pm
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Chris Mueller
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Thanks guys for your quick replies! I will have a closer look on the Graybar. Hopefully I can find all needed spare parts within that old fan.
In the meantime I glasblasted the mainparts and got a first look on the bare core of my fan. Even if it's made of stamped steel it seems to be built pretty rock solid! And I found even more screws hidden under the thick layers of paint. :)

Tomorrow I will try to get the headwire stripped off and ready to be soldered again. Are there any requirements for the headwire in terms of corss-section / thickness? I am planning to use very flexible "thick" wires that are able to bend a lot. Any recommendation?

Cory, thanks for your tips! I will see how and where to order the glue and varnish.


Here are the photos of the glasblasted parts from today:


















Best,

Chris

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 Posted: Tue Mar 5th, 2019 10:02 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Use regular epoxy.  Some JB weld has metal powder in it and may be conductive. 

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 Posted: Tue Mar 5th, 2019 11:19 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Wow, that glass blasting does a super job of cleaning those parts. Amazing! Can you give more information on how that works and what gear you need in order to do it?

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 Posted: Tue Mar 5th, 2019 11:44 pm
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Lane Shirey
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A sand blast Cabinet with glass beads.  

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 Posted: Wed Mar 6th, 2019 01:26 pm
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Chris Mueller
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Thanks!

David, the process itself is pretty easy: Just use a sandblast cabinet with a high pressure line (around 4 to 8 bar) that "shoots" small glass beads. All you have to do is point them onto your part that you want to clean. Just be sure to use glass beads and not sand as sand can be way to aggressive. Glass beads are very gentle to the surface beneath rust and paint. I think you can basically use every cabinet for that.

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 Posted: Wed Mar 6th, 2019 07:16 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Sure beats cleaning parts with a spinning wire brush.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 7th, 2019 02:14 pm
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Chris Mueller
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I finally got the cage blasted. Unfortunately most of the struts show signs of some heavy use if you have a closer look on all the dents and pretty rough surface. I don't believe the original state of the struts has been that "rough"?
I am still not 100% sure what cable I will use. On the one hand there is your recommended cable from antiquefanparts that looks great but will be complex to get and on the other hand there are new textile cables from "amazon" or lamp suppliers like https://www.amazon.de/Textilkabel-Stoffkabel-verseilt-zweiadrig-schwarz/dp/B075F3Z4ST or https://www.amazon.de/Textilkabel-Stoffkabel-2-adrig-Europe-Schwarz/dp/B0784HC4CW/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_60_tr_t_2/257-9297189-5705609?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=J0FM8XF6ASHWMMSK1XKY.








Best 
Chris

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 Posted: Fri Mar 8th, 2019 04:29 am
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Cory Baughn
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JB Kwik is an insulator, not an inductor per their website. I like the way you can work it and get it where you want it, and it sets up quickly. The JB Weld SteelStik has metal, but not the JB Kwik.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 03:26 pm
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Chris Mueller
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While waiting on the Graybar spare parts assembly :D I decided to clean the rotor. Here are some photos before and after glasblasting:
Before:





After:





I can't wait for the Graybar to arrive and let me continue the restoration. :)

Best
Chris



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