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Unusual EMI fan motor?  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Mar 13th, 2019 11:49 am
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Pete Moulds
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Location: Bumi Serpong Damai, Jakarta, Indonesia
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On unpacking some recently shipped fans I recalled this odd EMI fan motor which looks early. It was bought 'as is' mounted on a 1905? GE pancake trunnion base (photos below).

It has no ventilation holes whatsoever; whereas later EMI fans all had very many air vents.  I only discovered today while preparing it to photograph that it has a rear bearing thin brass oil catcher with an internal felt ring. The oilers themselves are missing.
The motor has no indications of possible mounting points for cage struts nor any carrying handle mounting holes either, which makes me suspicious that it may, just possibly, be a static motor engine for something else? If so, why the trunnion mounts on the side of the motor?
The motor tag shows the model number 'M36' but the bottom right box on the tag has no title but is marked '110-50', which could be a variable voltage? The 'REV' and 'HP' boxes are not filled.

Does any member have any information? If it is a fan motor, I would love to know what the blades, cage, base and oilers looked like. If not, what is it?













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 Posted: Wed Mar 13th, 2019 11:25 pm
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Jim Kovar
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Hi, Pete.

It's interesting, though not stamped,

the nameplate has a spot for power



factor,...  it being such a small motor,


relatively.   I'd guess the same plate


was used on larger motors, too.







Forty cycles is somewhat uncommon

here in the USA.  I've seen a few US


made fans marked 40 cycles.  Pretty



sure the 40 cycle power was locally


generated by a small municipality.


Was 40 cycle current common in


Europe when that fan was new?

 

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 06:23 am
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Pete Moulds
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Hi Jim

I honestly have no idea about the history of power generation specs either in Europe or North Africa where the fan was made (Holland) and subsequently presumably supplied to (Egypt).

Maybe some of the electrical whizzes on the Forum may know?

Do you have any ideas on what is the significance of the 110---50 stamped on the unnamed lower right tag box?
Could it be a range of voltages? Is that possible?

Best regards
Pete

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 03:42 pm
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Aaron Hardy
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Pete Moulds wrote: Hi Jim

I honestly have no idea about the history of power generation specs either in Europe or North Africa where the fan was made (Holland) and subsequently presumably supplied to (Egypt).

Maybe some of the electrical whizzes on the Forum may know?

Do you have any ideas on what is the significance of the 110---50 stamped on the unnamed lower right tag box?
Could it be a range of voltages? Is that possible?

Best regards
Pete
110v-50hz was European (fairly) standard prior to WWII, so that makes sense. There were sporadic 40hz systems, but most of Europe adopted 50hz in the early 1900s. As to 100v-40hz, if I may hazard a guess, it could have been manufactured for use in one of the Netherland’s territories or the Middle East. You mentioned Egypt which was utilizing 40hz through WWII. I would guess the motor is an M36 110v-50hz motor manufactured for export use in a 100v-40hz system which is why the HP and Rev boxes are blank. Just my two cents.

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 03:49 pm by Aaron Hardy

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 04:44 pm
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Pete Moulds
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Hi Aaron

Many thanks for your comments, very informative. I never paid much attention to cycles in the past, entirely out of ignorance.

The only question I have is, "If they stamped the tag as 100 volts and 40 cycles in the correctly titled boxes, then why add the 110---50 as contradictory voltages and cycles?"

"The thot plickens."

Best regards
Pete

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 06:56 pm
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Aaron Hardy
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The fan will run fine at either 40 or 50 cycles. The 10hz differential will have little affect other than the motor running a bit slower at 40hz. I’d be careful running it at 60hz though. Speeding it up could cause undo stress and wear due to both age and the motor not being engineered for the higher RPM. The 110-50 designation was probably just to identify the motor for technicians, but it was rated 100-40 for the “target market” if you will. Again, just theory.

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 06:56 pm by Aaron Hardy

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