AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Need to hire a pro at stator removal

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Rod Rogers, Larry Hancock
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Need to hire a pro at stator removal  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed May 22nd, 2019 07:02 am
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline





  Hi, I’m new on the forum!  I’m an experienced tinkerer, but I know that I am in over my head. I’m looking to pay someone to restore my fan or at minimum remove the Westinghouse stator. 





I have Pryne and Co “Pryanco” from 1934 manufactured by Westinghouse . This is a special fan that is an overhead exhaust for a stove range. I cleaned up the housing & rotor and want to rewire it. I’ve read threads on here on stator removal tools and techniques but want to leave that to a pro. This is a press fit stator in a bullet shaped housing. 

There are no vents at all by design because of cooking grease. It’s cooled by heatsink conduction from its aluminum cast housing. If you need to drill holes in the housing to get the stator out..that’s ok. Maybe TIG weld the holes to fill them again? I had another idea, thread bicycle brake cable through the stator to extract it with a winch. 


Motor still works perfectly (especially now that I cleaned it up). But I want and perhaps need to replace it’s mains/power cord. 
I wasn’t going to do a vintage cord restore for a couple reasons. A) it’s tucked in a ceiling it’s whole life. B) I want to use modern fireproof cable and fiberglass like jacket insulation for fireproofing.  I’m a little flexible if you’re a purist. But the original cord has two layers of asbestos insulation because this goes over a range. I already bought the new cord which is 3 prong. 

Can I pay a trusted member of this community to 

1) get the stator out 

Optionally:
2) proceed with the rewire and binding with hemp string or whatever appropriate 
3) install inline fuse
4) rewick (I just found goop in the oil ports but there might have been a wick in there?)


Last edited on Wed May 22nd, 2019 07:53 am by Chris Murphy

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed May 22nd, 2019 11:29 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
David Allen
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 6th, 2017
Location: Northport, Alabama, USA
Status: 
Online
Ooh I like that! What sort of blade does it have?

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed May 22nd, 2019 11:50 am
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Dan Hilton
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2011
Location: St Louis, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
It's likely that stator was 'hot dropped' in to the aluminum housing.  The aluminum housing is heated so it expands, then the room temp stator is quickly placed in the housing while the housing is at the expanded state.



One the aluminum housing cools it shrinks down on the stator providing an interference fit and thus retention of the stator in the housing.



Not saying I know that's your situation but looks to be.

You could try to heat that housing up with a torch from the outside to get it to expand then the stator my free up and slide out.




Dan H.

Last edited on Wed May 22nd, 2019 11:54 am by Dan Hilton

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed May 22nd, 2019 04:36 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
David Hoatson
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Oct 5th, 2013
Location: Chestertown, Maryland USA
Status: 
Offline
Find or make a pipe that sits on the motor case, just outside of the stator. Its inside hole needs to let the stator coil pass through. You might find a size of PVC pipe that works. Or you may need to get one made by a machinist from steel or aluminum. Hold the pipe against the motor, and tap the pipe against the concrete floor. Inertia should make the coil slide out. Stuff the pipe with rags so the coil doesn’t smack into the ground. 
On Emersons, folks use a smaller PVC pipe that slides though the inside of the stator and sits against the back of the motor case. Then, tap on ground. If you are not careful, you can crack the back out of the motor case. 

You might be able to thread screws into the stator bolt holes, hold a spacer on the motor case lip, stick a pry bar under the head of the bolt and pry using the spacer as a fulcrum. Or use a dent puller slide hammer. 

It all depends on how tight the stator is. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed May 22nd, 2019 08:10 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
It's likely that stator was 'hot dropped' in to the aluminum housing. 

I agree that this is a likely scenario.



You could try to heat that housing up with a torch from the outside to get it to expand then the stator my free up and slide out.

I'm looking to pay someone to do it. Sadly, I don't have a workshop where I can do that. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 04:03 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Since my last post...
A) I tested the motor and it works

B) I succeeded at getting the stator out with a heat gun and pvc pipe inertia trick! Thanks for the encouragement!


Now I need advice on wiring it. 

1) I haven’t removed the wires yet but it looks like the thin stator leads will be hard to get to. 

2) there was some black goop sealing the housing where the power cable entered. It might have been Bakelite or rubber? Is there a modern equivalent that can take high temperature? Caulk/epoxy? Maybe a rubber gasket?

3) it’s currently a two prong cord.  if I wire with a 3 prong cord, do I attach the ground to the chassis of the motor? Should I just ignore the ground and cut the ground pin off of the new cord? It’s going into a two prong power outlet at the moment. Since it’s mounted on the ceiling where nobody touches it, I’m not sure if grounding should even be a concern...

4) would it make sense to add a fuse to this somewhere? If so where?

5) are there any considerations about getting the stator back in?

6) how do I know if this had  oil wicks? 




Close up of power going into stator. 




Aperture in housing where black goo had sealed power cable. The heat gun made it supple for quite a while. See original post for a sense of what it looked like. 


Black goo that had been a hard seal around power cable. 



Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 04:05 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Existing wire condition. Too fragile and corroded to make me comfortable. 



Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 05:49 pm
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
David Hoatson
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Oct 5th, 2013
Location: Chestertown, Maryland USA
Status: 
Offline
The black goop may be the remains of a rubber grommet. Seriously. McMaster Carr or your local hardware store has new ones. 
I buy #11 exacto blades in boxes of 100. To change the headwire, carefully cut into the old connection. Be gentle. Unsolder the old wire or cut it. Make sure the old copper wire is super clean. Scrape any oxidation off of the area where you are going to solder the new wire. I use the super-flexible OTR headwire that you can buy from AntiqueFanParts.com. Twist the old and new wires together. Solder. I use a pistol grip Weller 100/140 watt. Tape the connection with cloth friction tape.  I tie a piece of lacing cord around the end of the headwire’s cloth sheath to keep it from fraying and getting loose.  Make sure you know the orientation and available space where the wire exits the motor case. Often, there is not much room. If you can, physically restrain the wire to the coil, using friction tape or lacing cord. 

To install the coil in the motor case, I buy long threaded rod from McMaster Carr. Thread them into the coil. Start sliding the coil into the motor, making sure the headwire is feeding though OK. Poke the 4 threaded rods through the screw holes in the case. Add a couple washers and a nut to each. Gradually tighten the nuts, pulling the coil into the case. Remember to watch the headwire so it doesn’t get pinched. Once in place, remove the threaded rods and install the real screws. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 05:55 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
David Hoatson
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Oct 5th, 2013
Location: Chestertown, Maryland USA
Status: 
Offline
It is not necessary to use a 3-conductor cord, but if you do, crimp a lug to the green wire and connect it to the metal fan body using an existing screw. 
Many pre-1940 fans have a switch/speed coil setup in the base. There is a plastic-covered switch lever. If the plastic cracks off, the metal lever is exposed, causing a shock hazard. If you want, use a polarized plug (or 3-wire) and make sure the neutral connects to the switch (not the hot). Touching neutral is no hazard. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 07:16 pm
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for the grounding advice. There is no switch on this fan. Its toggled on/off by an ordinary light switch on the wall. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jun 4th, 2019 09:47 pm
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Richard Daugird
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 12th, 2017
Location: Texas City, Between Hou. & Galveston, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
Here's some good info on wrapping the ends of your cord so it doesn't fray.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Sat Jun 8th, 2019 04:12 am
  PMQuoteReply
12th Post
Chris Murphy
Guest
 

Joined: Wed May 22nd, 2019
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
The fan is mostly restored. There are some things I still need to address at a future date. But it’s up and running and purring quietly. This was a major project and I didn’t think I could get this far. It also including getting 85 years of grease off of the ductwork in the ceiling. I question my own sanity. 


Diamond in the rough!










Attached Image (viewed 53 times):

AC7AF2BE-CDE4-4B16-B5B6-E98B02F8A2AF.jpeg

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

Current time is 05:24 pm  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Need to hire a pro at stator removal Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1938 seconds (25% database + 75% PHP). 29 queries executed.