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Troubleshooting motor  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 06:54 pm
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Bill Laswell
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Should could use some help. I have a GE FM12-MI that I have been restoring.  We bought the fan at an antique shop.  It looked cool and fit perfect in our old house.  The tag had the price and said "works".  When we plugged it in, it started smoking and arching down at the switch and the head wire just out side the motor caught fire.  unplugged it, put out the fire and negotiated a very attractive price. Disassembled the fan, checked for continuity across the stator wires -- none. Disassembled the motor, clean the stator and rotor, varnished the coils, replaced the head wire.  Reassembled the motor -- it turns smooth and free.  I attached a plug to the head wire to test the motor -- nothing! No movement, no resistance when I spin it by hand, no hum, absolutely nothing.  I'm not sure what to do or check.  Can you check a rotor?  I've looked through previous posts but not sure where to start.  I have attached pics 















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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 07:10 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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Bill you might have done all that work for nothing. Did you measure the stator leads for resistance? What kind of reading do you get? If it started smoking probably a short. Does it have a choke coil? How many speeds?

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 08:20 pm
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Bill Laswell
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This is a 3 speed fan. Yes there is a step down transformer in the base (this is a pedestal fan).  I assume this transformer is a choke.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 08:31 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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Bill Laswell wrote: This is a 3 speed fan. Yes there is a step down transformer in the base (this is a pedestal fan).  I assume this transformer is a choke.Hows the choke look? get a reading on that also.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 09:08 pm
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Stan Adams
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If you attached a plug to the two motor leads & got nothing, your stator has a broken stator wire. You may be able to dig into the coils & find the broken magnet wire, but since you said the headwire caught fire, my suspicion is your stator is history. That is a shaded pole motor, so the only thing the choke does is control speed. You will probably have to get it rewound or find a used one.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:08 pm
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Bill Laswell
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I was afraid of the possibility of a broken wire in the stator:)  Does anyone know who would be able to rewind this stator?  Is the cost on something like this crazy?  Stan, I noticed you are located in Houston -- I'm just south of Houston in Angleton.

Thanks!

Bill  

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:10 pm
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Bill Laswell
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Also, do rotors ever go bad? Is there a way to check a rotor?

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:29 pm
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Bill Laswell
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In answer to Vic's Vic, I measured across the leads and there was no continuity.  I thought this would reveal a short if there was one.  I don't know a lot about motors but I check across the leads before doing anything and it read Zero.
I guess I need a primer on small electric motors.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:36 pm
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Stan Adams
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Bill, I am on Lake Houston 3 miles outside the beltway. I am going to Fan Fair next week, but when I get back, get with me. I probably have a used motor.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:37 pm
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Don Tener
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Bill Laswell wrote: In answer to Vic's Vic, I measured across the leads and there was no continuity.  I thought this would reveal a short if there was one.  I don't know a lot about motors but I check across the leads before doing anything and it read Zero.
I guess I need a primer on small electric motors.
If no continuity then you have a break in the wires somewhere and it will not run. It should show ohms. The way to check for a short in the stator is to put your meter on one wire and then start touching the steel core to see if you get a reading. Check each stator wire that way and If you get a ohm reading you have a short in the stator.

Last edited on Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:38 pm by Don Tener

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 Posted: Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:50 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Ok, first of all when reading a meter, a “0” or something close to that indicates a dead short.  “OL” or “ - -“ indicates an open circuit.   As Don said, your readings from headwire to headwire should be roughly in the range of 30 to 200 ohms.  Anything more or less is suspect.  This is a rough range and some fans definitely differ.  

And as Don said, any headwire measured to the core should be open, or no continuity.  If a very high ohm reading is measured, then it’s likely that you have compromised insulation in the stator.  


If the headwires are burnt, frayed, or crumbling insulation, then they should be marked and cut and these measurements taken close to the stator.  


Most times, old fans don’t run because of a bad headwire or shabby repairs. I’ve only had 2 stators rewound in the many non-working fans that I’ve bought.  


Best of luck with your restoration!

Last edited on Wed Jul 10th, 2019 11:57 pm by Lane Shirey

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 Posted: Thu Jul 11th, 2019 06:18 am
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Bill Laswell
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Don,Thanks to you and Lane for the education.  Someone told me how to check it but, clearing I misunderstood their instruction.  This will not be my last fan so the learning curve is not in vane.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 11th, 2019 06:24 am
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Bill Laswell
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Wow Stan, that would be incredible if you have something that will work.  I will measure you when you return,  Enjoy your time.  I wish I could be there:)

Blessings!

Bill

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 Posted: Thu Jul 11th, 2019 10:43 pm
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Tom Newcity
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The 1st step in a complete restoration is to make sure it works and all parts are accounted for.  There is nothing like having to tear down your fan AFTER painting because of bad parts. 

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 Posted: Fri Jul 12th, 2019 01:26 am
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Bill Laswell
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Wise counsel Tom. A lesson learned the hard way but learned none the less. I will find a stator and complete the fan — no regrets. I don’t consider myself wise, just wiser:)

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