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 Posted: Sat Aug 10th, 2019 04:21 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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Westinghouse 321347 Stator head wire was clipped off. I removed Stator but wire left is very short maybe 3/8 inch.3 Wires all look brown. The connecting wire that was cut has a red, green and white wire. can I use ohm meter to determine which wire goes on what Stator wire. newbie to this.

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 Posted: Sat Aug 10th, 2019 09:59 pm
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David Kilnapp
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The first thing I would do is give yourself more wire to work with off the stator. Solder some new wire to the 3/8 bit of wire that is still left but be very careful not to damage the stator. This will take some very good soldering. Hope you are experienced in this. Cover the soldered connections with shrink wrap (you can get it at any hardware store). Once you have more wire to work with, label the three wires a, b, and c. Then label the three speed coil wires 1, 2, and 3. Now connect the power to the coil and test the nine possible combinations (using wire nuts), writing down every combination as you put power to the fan. Then test the fan at the three speeds and write down your observations. There are other ways to do this by using your ohm meter to figure out the high, the low and the common wire but this way will get you there without having to explain which wire on the speed coil is the high, which is the low and which is the common.
This is the way I did it before I really understood how speed coils connect to three wire stators.

Last edited on Sat Aug 10th, 2019 10:01 pm by David Kilnapp

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 Posted: Sat Aug 10th, 2019 10:25 pm
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Steve Rockwell
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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 10:46 am
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Fred Lawrence
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Thank you, I will be careful and let you know how my first patient does.

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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 11:00 am
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Fred Lawrence
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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 11:44 am
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David Kilnapp
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Wow, that's not much wire to work with. I would try some solder and seal connectors. They work pretty well. Use the smallest ones that you can fit over the wires. All you have to do is clean off the end to be soldered to so that a little of the wire is bare, then slide the connector over it with your new wire in the other end then carefully heat the connector so that the solder inside flows to connect the two wires. I would then cover the connector with a black shrink wrap tube for added insulation. This will take patience and care but it will be a lot cheaper than a stator rewind. Check for continuity once you get all three done to make sure that you achieved three good connections. You can get solder and seal connectors from Amazon.com or at most hardware stores. I have had good luck with the ones shown below.




Last edited on Sun Aug 11th, 2019 11:52 am by David Kilnapp

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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 12:16 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Is this your fan? If it is, it dates to mid 1920's. The Micarta blades were invented by George Westinghouse. Micarta is still in use today as an insulator (google it). This is a terrific fan which tends to run quite hot to the touch and that is normal for this fan. I'm surprised you were able to remove the stator. Pressed steel cases are very challenging and getting the stators back into the case so that the holes line up is as tough as removing them. You might try and sand down (ever so slightly) the outside of the stator which helps when you have to re-insert the stator back into the case. Some folks have had luck with putting the stator in the freezer over night to shrink it a bit though I have never tried that. Be aware that you have chosen one of the hardest fans to work on when it comes to removing the stator. GE's and Emersons from that time period are much easier to work on. So the lesson is that if you can successfully pull this restoration off, you will have really accomplished something! Best of luck.



Last edited on Sun Aug 11th, 2019 05:49 pm by David Kilnapp

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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 05:54 pm
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Sean Campbell
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I’m actually quite interested in knowing how you removed the stator Fred. 

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 12:53 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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I used fine scissors and heat shrink to expose more conductor then soldered wires together with more heat shrink.I then heat shrink-ed the 3 wires into one bundle. Measured 5.2 ohms, 19.6 and 24.5 between wires. Should I try selecting a common that then measures 19.6 and 24.5 to other 2 wires? Not understanding stator winding yet. will try different combinations.





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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 12:55 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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Thanks didn't check your message before I heat shrink-ed and trimed the stator.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 01:01 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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Sean,the client did not want to spend lot of money on time. I was afraid of heating the case. So I did drill 3 3/16 holes in rear and used a brass punch to tap out slowly. I know I desecrated the case but client didn't care. his wife liked the look and low noise running. didn't check fan resistance before taking apart and after putting together it turns but feels slightly tight. trying to align better.

when I push fan slightly it turns a half turn, no rubbing noise so now not sure if it is lubrication or bushing alignment or maybe I didn't seat stator evenly checking seating first.

Last edited on Wed Aug 14th, 2019 01:05 pm by Fred Lawrence

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 01:21 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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The rotor has slight resistance, if I push fan with finger it moves a half rotation, Duh I did not check prior to disassembly. I will try cleaning and some 3 in 1 oil on bushings?

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 02:32 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Nice work on the soldered connections. It’s a pity you had to drill holes in the case though. In the future you can use a punch to tap out stators though you must be exceedingly careful not to damage the stator in the process. But like I said earlier, you picked the most challenging fan to work on so other fan manufacturers are much more user friendly.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 10:11 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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Thanks will do better job on next fan (no drilling). I intend to use metal weld then some black paint. will post picture if I can figure out heat buildup which I suspect is what caused the original failure.The client told me he was using fan and it just stopped. he unplugged let it sit and plugged it back in it would start then stop. He returned to guy he bought it from and that was who cut wires to motor. That guy said it was bad. I just learned this. Suspect lack of lubrication or worn bushings?I had it running but case got hot so I shut it off. Looking at cleaning and lubrication. will try to measure inner diameter of bushings also.

will definitely ask advise from all.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 14th, 2019 10:27 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Fred Lawrence wrote: I used fine scissors and heat shrink to expose more conductor then soldered wires together with more heat shrink.I then heat shrink-ed the 3 wires into one bundle. Measured 5.2 ohms, 19.6 and 24.5 between wires. Should I try selecting a common that then measures 19.6 and 24.5 to other 2 wires? Not understanding stator winding yet. will try different combinations.





The 24.5 is the measurement through both coils. Whichever wire was not included in that measurement is the common.  The lowest resistance is your main/run coil. Plus the common.  The middle measurement is the common and the start coil.  
There should be wiring diagrams on the forum that can help you figure out where the 3 wires land, now that you’ve identified them.  

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 Posted: Thu Aug 15th, 2019 12:24 pm
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Fred Lawrence
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I just found a FAQ authored by Dave Friedlund. How to measure and the proper way to remove stator. Every first timer should read this.

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