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NEW Dayton “Toilet Bowl” Oscillator Necks  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2019 04:02 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Started by cutting blanks last night. 6061-T6 heat treated aluminum. 




The rest is up to the machinist. I told him to take pictures in case anyone is interested in seeing the process. 




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 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2019 11:09 pm
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Geoff Dunaway
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Process is educational and fascinating. Keep us posted. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Nov 13th, 2019 11:27 pm
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Todd Adornato
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Indeed - seeing the machining process as it progresses would be most interesting!

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 12:21 am
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Mark Olson
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Billet parts. Please forgive me for asking, but wouldn't castings be more economical?
No disrespect intended. Nice project.

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 01:10 am
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Richard Daugird
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I have been wanting to try my hand at casting for twenty years. I even made a charcoal foundry ten years ago, but haven’t used it yet. This is a great project for CNC machining. 

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 03:36 am
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David A Cherry
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  it should've never been a casting in the first place, castings are very porous. 

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 04:10 am
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Steve Stephens
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David A Cherry wrote:   it should've never been a casting in the first place, castings are very porous. Metals, including castings, are not porous but castings can have what is called "porosity".   

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 Posted: Thu Nov 14th, 2019 02:13 pm
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Richard Daugird
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I have to agree with both Dave and Steve. My humble opinion is, a casting is not as strong as a part machined from a solid piece. Furthurmore, looking at the smooth surfaces of the originals, they were probably die cast, which would be difficult to do on a small scale to say the least, as opposed to sand casting, fairly easy to do in the home shop. This is as close as I have come to the process:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alfyLvcQWdY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEAMjRJNpE4

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 Posted: Sun Dec 22nd, 2019 03:15 am
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David A Cherry
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 The definition of porosity is the state of being porous...

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 Posted: Sun Dec 22nd, 2019 04:23 am
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Steve Stephens
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David A Cherry wrote:  The definition of porosity is the state of being porous...I have long collected old cast iron cookware and have yet to find one that is porous.  Nothing leaks out of my pans and, on the sad occasion that I receive a broken piece in the mail, the inside of the casting is a fresh cast iron color without any carbonized oils on the inside showing that the casting is not porous.  Also, cast metal tanks can hold pressure.  Not porous.

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 Posted: Sun Dec 22nd, 2019 05:59 pm
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William Dunlap
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I've discovered that during the restoration of classic motorcycles that some aluminum castings are full of tiny bubbles frozen within as the metal cooled. Often, these are subsurface and are only exposed when aggressively polishing.
At that point, the casting will never have an original look with multiple tiny craters all over it. I'm not sure that this satisfies the definition of porous, but it's similar.
I'm sure the same thing happens with pot metal and if so makes it degrade with time. Pot metal parts that are kept oily or greasy or those that keep their paint will likely last longer. The problem is that pot metal doesn't like to keep it's paint on for very long. Not sure why, but maybe it's because you can't oven bake pot metal without disastrous results, like you can with the rest of the fan.
Cheers,
Bill

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 Posted: Sun Dec 22nd, 2019 07:24 pm
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Steve Stephens
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William Dunlap wrote: I've discovered that during the restoration of classic motorcycles that some aluminum castings are full of tiny bubbles frozen within as the metal cooled. Often, these are subsurface and are only exposed when aggressively polishing.
At that point, the casting will never have an original look with multiple tiny craters all over it. I'm not sure that this satisfies the definition of porous, but it's similar.
From my understanding those small voids or bubbles are what "porosity" is but a casting with them is not "porous".

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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2019 02:00 pm
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David Lewis
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I wanted to argue that cast iron is porous, but after some research I have concluded that it is not. It just has inherent surface irregularities even in a polished state. Either way, Richard's use of billet will undoubtedly result in a much more durable part in the end. While it is "incorrect" to the purist, sometimes a repairman has to use the means that are readily available to him to get the job done. If he pulls it off with a durable convincingly original looking part, my hat comes off for him.

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 Posted: Mon Dec 23rd, 2019 02:58 pm
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Richard Daugird
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I plan to get back on this project after the holidays. We are still delivering gifts to the last few of 700+ families during our "Blue Santa" program, in which toys and bicycles are delivered by Galveston Police to needy children all across the county.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2019 03:18 am
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Pete Moulds
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Hi Steve

You wrote,

"I have long collected old cast iron cookware and have yet to find one that is porous.  Nothing leaks out of my pans and, on the sad occasion that I receive a broken piece in the mail, the inside of the casting is a fresh cast iron color without any carbonized oils on the inside showing that the casting is not porous.  Also, cast metal tanks can hold pressure.  Not porous."


Having been in the oil and gas exploration business for longer than I care to mention, geologists and reservoir and petroleum engineers are very concerned with porosity because this is where the hydrocarbons are reservoired.

However they are also equally concerned with whether the pores are connected to each other so that liquids and gases can pass through them. This property we term 'permeability'. No 'permeability' = no flow.

That's why multiple fracking ('zip fracking') of horizontal section wells in tight shales is carried out to generate the permeability.

Your cast iron skillets may or may not be as porous as heck but without permeability there is no passage of cooking fluids; happily.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all fan collectors and their long suffering families (just kidding about 'long suffering').

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 Posted: Tue Dec 24th, 2019 04:26 am
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Steve Stephens
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Pete Moulds wrote: Hi Steve

However they are also equally concerned with whether the pores are connected to each other so that liquids and gases can pass through them. This property we term 'permeability'. No 'permeability' = no flow.
Permeability I have head of but haven't thought of it in use with metals I guess.  As an example, sintered metals are, or can be, permeable but "real' (natural) metals are not sintered so no problem there.  These is always a lot of discussion in the iron cookware community about if the iron is porous or not.   I think it's finally becoming known that cast iron is non-porous.A very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you Pete and all of the other fan collectors.

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