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Got my birthday cake early! 1906 16" GE Pancake fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 05:02 am
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Alex Rushing
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This beautiful fan arrived today, very well packed and separated, in good order from Lane Shirley.It is an early Christmas/birthday present to myself (Birthday is the 28th) since I had not even seen a pancake fan in person before now. I'm just blown away(in a couple ways) at this antique wind machine. The five speeds are by far my favorite feature. High speed will blow the glass out of a China cabinet, and low speed is a quiet gentle breeze. And the three speeds in the middle are great for normal fan use.


From my reading of dozens of GE cake threads, I believe this to be an early 1906 16" cake, since it still retains the decorative motor case, but has the smooth elegant base. Common relative to cake collecting, but not common at in all in the normal old-fan-people's world. I've been working in antiques since I was a teenager, and have not seen(or noticed maybe) a pancake fan in person. It is awesome to finally have one for my odd little fan accumulation. Gives even more perspective to the evolution of electric fans in the 20th century for me.

Only things I have planned for this one are to change the brown headwire out for a black one to match the line cord and add a line switch to the cord so I don't have to wear out the close-to-unobtainium switch at some point.


Anyway, I'll quit writing like a giddy little kid and finish up this post.  :hammer:


Video of my birthday cake.

Last edited on Tue Dec 10th, 2019 05:06 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 09:08 am
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Alex Rushing
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A few photos of my new baby. :pacifier:










And a couple of shots to get Kim Frank stirred up. :D






Last edited on Tue Dec 10th, 2019 09:08 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 10:10 am
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Lane Shirey
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Enjoy it Alex! I’m glad that you got it!

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:01 am
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Bobby Gaines
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Happy Birthday the 28th Alex! Great Pancake, Love it.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:47 am
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Alex Rushing
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Lane Shirey wrote: Enjoy it Alex! I’m glad that you got it!Indeed it will be enjoyed! Thank you, Lane! :)

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:48 am
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Alex Rushing
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Bobby Gaines wrote: Happy Birthday the 28th Alex! Great Pancake, Love it.
Thank you much, Bobby! :)

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:52 am
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David Kilnapp
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Happy Birthday 🎂. Lane does first class work. You have a beautiful example of a GE Pancake though not technically a pancake because it has two bearings (front and back). This model has been affectionately referred to as “the big ugly” by some collectors. I have this model and it’s a terrific daily runner during the hot summer months. You’re right about the high speed- like being in an Everglades boat!

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:52 am
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David Kilnapp
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Happy Birthday 🎂. Lane does first class work. You have a beautiful example of a GE Pancake though not technically a pancake because it has two bearings (front and back). This model has been affectionately referred to as “the big ugly” by some collectors. I have this model and it’s a terrific daily runner during the hot summer months. You’re right about the high speed- like being in an Everglades boat!

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 12:27 pm
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Kim Frank
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Happy Birthday Alex. I can't think of a better present to buy yourself. If you continue to buy a GE cake each Birthday, you'll be 84 when you have the entire collection of GE Pancakes in a/c.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 01:45 pm
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Alex Rushing
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David Kilnapp wrote: Happy Birthday 🎂. Lane does first class work. You have a beautiful example of a GE Pancake though not technically a pancake because it has two bearings (front and back). This model has been affectionately referred to as “the big ugly” by some collectors. I have this model and it’s a terrific daily runner during the hot summer months. You’re right about the high speed- like being in an Everglades boat!Thank you much, David! :)Indeed Lane does. It is the first fan I've ever bought I don't need to restore. A birthday break cake, if you will.
Doing my research, I believe I skirted "The Big Ugly" version by one half year(or so), since mine still has the '03-'05 style motor with beauty ring around the casting openings, making it not so smooth. I tend to agree it isn't quite as pancake like as sone(having the extra bonus bearing and all..haha), but it seems the consensus is that it can be called a pancake fan. One could say it is the biggest domestic tank fan motor if one felt so inclined. :D

I am loving this fan more and more. Since my dog had surgery, I've barely slept. But, sitting in front of the '06, I fell asleep with it on the second-to-highest speed. Woke up and my hair looked like it was styled back. :imao

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 01:56 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Kim Frank wrote: Happy Birthday Alex. I can't think of a better present to buy yourself. If you continue to buy a GE cake each Birthday, you'll be 84 when you have the entire collection of GE Pancakes in a/c. Thank you much, Kim.....GE cake master!:bow
At the way these fans are increasing in value, I'd have to also double the amount of money I make every two years to do so.:imao
I'm just glad there are people making parts for them now.

Family kept asking "why did you spend that much on another fan?"
I let them see it and showed it running to them, now they know better than to ask me that again. I put the Emerson 73648 next to it(a good fan by most accounts) to show what the cakes are known for. It made the 73648 seemingly mundane in most respects. :hammer:

Last edited on Tue Dec 10th, 2019 02:00 pm by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 03:23 pm
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Richard Daugird
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You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 05:53 pm
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Sean Campbell
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Happy Birthday Alex! 🎂 What everybody said is true: pancakes are addictive! They are great fans to run and display. Had to get rid of my 1906 to help pay for school, but I’m about to finally dig into my 1900! 

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 07:08 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.Funny story behind the 13 year membership. I thought I was going to get myself into fan restoration when I was 19yo-21yo. Being less patient than I am now, I tore open a Westy 164848G and basically tore it up. Didn't take another old fan apart after that went badly. So left in my workshop were a bunch of broken fans.
Aside from spray painting a couple of cheaper fans(without disassembly..haha), I didn't touch an antique fan for restoration until this year around July. Father asked me if I could work on a 73648 he bought (and no problem if it went south). I did, and guess all the years I spent restoring antique furniture and lighting taught me patience and appreciation.Starting August I restored my AOU AD1, Emerson 10" Junior(1930) Oscillator, Emerson 73648(one I bought thirteen years ago), Kelmet Busy B, THE 164848G(the one that turned me off to fan resto for 13 years), Fitzgerald Star-Rite, Westinghouse 516860A(profile photo), Westinghouse LivelyAire 10LA(early one), and starting an AOU AB1. Gained repair/rework(remove stator for full rewire and cleaning, Commutator/brush work, etc) experience with a Singer No. 1901(commutator), Polar Cub Type G(commutator), Emerson 8" B Junior Oscillator, and several more.

Won't be collecting cakes though. That requires serious money, of which I have no serious money.  :violin:

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 07:10 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Sean Campbell wrote: Happy Birthday Alex! 🎂 What everybody said is true: pancakes are addictive! They are great fans to run and display. Had to get rid of my 1906 to help pay for school, but I’m about to finally dig into my 1900! Thank you much, Sean! :)Shame you had to sell the '06, but I can understand why. Best of luck on the '00, Sean! Will be looking forward to how it goes for you. :)

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 08:35 pm
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Lane Shirey
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David Kilnapp wrote: Happy Birthday 🎂. Lane does first class work. You have a beautiful example of a GE Pancake though not technically a pancake because it has two bearings (front and back). This model has been affectionately referred to as “the big ugly” by some collectors. I have this model and it’s a terrific daily runner during the hot summer months. You’re right about the high speed- like being in an Everglades boat!Big ugly is the 1908 with no motor ornamentation. 
And thanks so much everyone for your kind comments on my restorations. I try very hard to provide safe, reliable restorations. 

Cheers and Happy Holidays!

Last edited on Tue Dec 10th, 2019 10:47 pm by Lane Shirey

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 08:40 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.Funny story behind the 13 year membership.
Won't be collecting cakes though. That requires serious money, of which I have no serious money.  :violin:
It's probably best to start on older cast-iron fans, they come apart so much easier. Especially Pancakes; a few bolts and they nearly disassemble themselves. They don't have to be expensive(relatively); I got a complete original for $500-$600, don't remember exactly. Basket cases for a few hundred. Granted those basket cases will cost some money in the long run for missing parts, but that's O.K. with me, especially since I usually don't have the coin to plunk down all at once for a complete, nice example. Any time I see a cheap one, or a good deal on parts, I scoop it up. I have about a dozen now, probably need to let a few go...

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 08:42 pm
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Richard Daugird
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David Kilnapp wrote: Happy Birthday 🎂. Lane does first class work. You have a beautiful example of a GE Pancake though not technically a pancake because it has two bearings (front and back). This model has been affectionately referred to as “the big ugly” by some collectors. I have this model and it’s a terrific daily runner during the hot summer months. You’re right about the high speed- like being in an Everglades boat!Is that the "Big Ugly"? I thought those were '07-'08, look a bit different on the back of the motor...

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 09:17 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Richard Daugird wrote: Is that the "Big Ugly"? I thought those were '07-'08, look a bit different on the back of the motor...
This 1907 ('08 too?) stick pancake is what I thought was the Big Ugly.
Was it something about design and styles of the time that allowed such an ugly fan to be produced and bought? Cars from 1907-08 were beautiful.
I don't think there is a 16" Big Ugly to compare to this 12" stick mount.  Notice that the 12" trunnion from 1907-08 has a much more pleasing style, especially in the rear of the motor.
Congratulations on your first pancake Alex.   Those 16" fans blow a storm.    Think about giving yourself a valentines fan gift of a 12" pancake, I know you'll be impressed with one.

If you have not seen my pancake blog take a look at it-
http://earlyfans.blogspot.com/2011/02/ge-pancake-1894-1908.html





Below is the trunnion from 1907-08



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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 09:39 pm
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Tristan Crider
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I really want an 08! I've seen tons of cakes on Ebay and not one was an 08.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 10:01 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.Funny story behind the 13 year membership.
Won't be collecting cakes though. That requires serious money, of which I have no serious money.  :violin:
It's probably best to start on older cast-iron fans, they come apart so much easier. Especially Pancakes; a few bolts and they nearly disassemble themselves. They don't have to be expensive(relatively); I got a complete original for $500-$600, don't remember exactly. Basket cases for a few hundred. Granted those basket cases will cost some money in the long run for missing parts, but that's O.K. with me, especially since I usually don't have the coin to plunk down all at once for a complete, nice example. Any time I see a cheap one, or a good deal on parts, I scoop it up. I have about a dozen now, probably need to let a few go...
Absolutely agree on the cast iron fans! The GE AOUs I have(AB1 and AD1) are a dream to work on. The Emerson cast iron fans are a dream too. I love oscillating fans, so pancakes lack that one feature I use for room fans. Plus, I love the added complication of making the motor and oscillator mechanism work perfectly in conjunction. One of my favorite cast iron fans I've saved(rewire, sanding commutator, new brushes, rewire, and touching up the paint) is a Singer(Diehl made) 1922 commutator No. 1901. Though, having dived in deep water with two stamped Westys so far, I find them fairly easy to work on now.
Outside of cake collecting, the one true obtainable "quintessential" cast iron golden age fan is the GE AOU "brass bell oscillator" series through the AD1. I find the AOU loop handle design to be memorizing to watch the contained motor movement in the frame. 

All in all, I feel like I made a good choice with the early-1906 16" Trunnion GE cake as a representation of earlier fan designs, as it is essentially built like a lot of fans from the 1890s onward. Next year I may look to buy a 12" pre-1900 stick mount to have a representation of an earlier design. :)


Last edited on Tue Dec 10th, 2019 10:07 pm by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:01 pm
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Sean Campbell
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Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.Funny story behind the 13 year membership.
Won't be collecting cakes though. That requires serious money, of which I have no serious money.  :violin:
It's probably best to start on older cast-iron fans, they come apart so much easier. Especially Pancakes; a few bolts and they nearly disassemble themselves. They don't have to be expensive(relatively); I got a complete original for $500-$600, don't remember exactly. Basket cases for a few hundred. Granted those basket cases will cost some money in the long run for missing parts, but that's O.K. with me, especially since I usually don't have the coin to plunk down all at once for a complete, nice example. Any time I see a cheap one, or a good deal on parts, I scoop it up. I have about a dozen now, probably need to let a few go...
Absolutely agree on the cast iron fans! The GE AOUs I have(AB1 and AD1) are a dream to work on. The Emerson cast iron fans are a dream too. I love oscillating fans, so pancakes lack that one feature I use for room fans. Plus, I love the added complication of making the motor and oscillator mechanism work perfectly in conjunction. One of my favorite cast iron fans I've saved(rewire, sanding commutator, new brushes, rewire, and touching up the paint) is a Singer(Diehl made) 1922 commutator No. 1901. Though, having dived in deep water with two stamped Westys so far, I find them fairly easy to work on now.
Outside of cake collecting, the one true obtainable "quintessential" cast iron golden age fan is the GE AOU "brass bell oscillator" series through the AD1. I find the AOU loop handle design to be memorizing to watch the contained motor movement in the frame. 

All in all, I feel like I made a good choice with the early-1906 16" Trunnion GE cake as a representation of earlier fan designs, as it is essentially built like a lot of fans from the 1890s onward. Next year I may look to buy a 12" pre-1900 stick mount to have a representation of an earlier design. :)


If that is your goal for next year, I would definitely go with an 1899 stick mount cake. 1899 cakes are relatively affordable and probably one of the most affordable 19th century fans. Any cake before '99 will be a very serious investment. Since you see to love saving fans, you should consider an 1899 stick mount in rough shape, but complete. It would probably be affordable and provide you with an excellent fan. Just my 2 cents.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:03 pm
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Tony Clayton
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Happy Birthday Alex!! You got your cake and eat it toooooo!! You got something coming in the mail to you soon.
:bigfan

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 Posted: Tue Dec 10th, 2019 11:39 pm
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Lane Shirey
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Tristan Crider wrote: I really want an 08! I've seen tons of cakes on Ebay and not one was an 08.
I believe the 16” “CGE” badged GE cake I have for sale is a 1908 if you’re interested.  

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 12:07 am
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Richard Daugird
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Outside of cake collecting, the one true obtainable "quintessential" cast iron golden age fan is the GE AOU "brass bell oscillator" series through the AD1. I find the AOU loop handle design to be memorizing to watch the contained motor movement in the frame. 


Ted has a couple nice Loop Handles up for grabs. I got one from him a couple years ago, TOP NOTCH.

http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/57269.html
http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/57268.html


 

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 12:22 am
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Richard Daugird
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This fan I gave to my parents for their 50th anniversary. You could say it functions pretty smooth...

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 02:18 am
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Alex Rushing
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Sean Campbell wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: Richard Daugird wrote: You've been here 13 years and just got your first cake? Only took me a month. Mine was a 16" too. Watch out, they multiply! You are right about the quality of Lane's work; myself and several friends/family have fans he has restored.Funny story behind the 13 year membership.
Won't be collecting cakes though. That requires serious money, of which I have no serious money.  :violin:
It's probably best to start on older cast-iron fans, they come apart so much easier. Especially Pancakes; a few bolts and they nearly disassemble themselves. They don't have to be expensive(relatively); I got a complete original for $500-$600, don't remember exactly. Basket cases for a few hundred. Granted those basket cases will cost some money in the long run for missing parts, but that's O.K. with me, especially since I usually don't have the coin to plunk down all at once for a complete, nice example. Any time I see a cheap one, or a good deal on parts, I scoop it up. I have about a dozen now, probably need to let a few go...
Absolutely agree on the cast iron fans! The GE AOUs I have(AB1 and AD1) are a dream to work on. The Emerson cast iron fans are a dream too. I love oscillating fans, so pancakes lack that one feature I use for room fans. Plus, I love the added complication of making the motor and oscillator mechanism work perfectly in conjunction. One of my favorite cast iron fans I've saved(rewire, sanding commutator, new brushes, rewire, and touching up the paint) is a Singer(Diehl made) 1922 commutator No. 1901. Though, having dived in deep water with two stamped Westys so far, I find them fairly easy to work on now.
Outside of cake collecting, the one true obtainable "quintessential" cast iron golden age fan is the GE AOU "brass bell oscillator" series through the AD1. I find the AOU loop handle design to be memorizing to watch the contained motor movement in the frame. 

All in all, I feel like I made a good choice with the early-1906 16" Trunnion GE cake as a representation of earlier fan designs, as it is essentially built like a lot of fans from the 1890s onward. Next year I may look to buy a 12" pre-1900 stick mount to have a representation of an earlier design. :)


If that is your goal for next year, I would definitely go with an 1899 stick mount cake. 1899 cakes are relatively affordable and probably one of the most affordable 19th century fans. Any cake before '99 will be a very serious investment. Since you see to love saving fans, you should consider an 1899 stick mount in rough shape, but complete. It would probably be affordable and provide you with an excellent fan. Just my 2 cents.
Excellent points, Sean! Thank you. I would love to do up a 1899th century stick cake myself, but as you said, would need to be fairly complete, or at least working in some form or another. I have quite a bit invested in tools for fan stuff now and believe I could safely restore most antique fans given time and money.Knowing my luck, after buying Lane's awesome 1906 cake, someone will bring an '06 into the store I work tomorrow, in terrible condition, and ask $50 for it. Seems that is how my life goes(haha). I do really like having taken a break from fan resto with the cake. It allowed me to focus on completing the Firetruck themed Westy and early LivelyAire, while waiting for the GE cake. 

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 02:20 am
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Alex Rushing
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Tony Clayton wrote: Happy Birthday Alex!! You got your cake and eat it toooooo!! You got something coming in the mail to you soon.
:bigfan
Thank you much, Tony! I'm excited to finally be getting a headwire for the bumble bee fan that won't tax the oscillator so badly. The 18-3 pendant cord is about as flexible as thick bailing wire, and you can hear the weak Kelmet/Gilbert oscillator struggling to oscillate with the stiff wire. :D

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 02:26 am
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote:
Outside of cake collecting, the one true obtainable "quintessential" cast iron golden age fan is the GE AOU "brass bell oscillator" series through the AD1. I find the AOU loop handle design to be memorizing to watch the contained motor movement in the frame. 


Ted has a couple nice Loop Handles up for grabs. I got one from him a couple years ago, TOP NOTCH.

http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/57269.html
http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/57268.html


 
GORGEOUS FANS! Ted does some awesome restos and restomods. Not a big fan of the bling wheels on the neck adjustment, but can see the appeal to many antique fan lovers. :)That three star oscillator is one I'd love to have, but I think I'll finish the last three project fans in my workshop before looking at more fans. :hammer:

As I always say, anyway we can save these fans from flampers and blockers(blade clocks) and make them usable again is a step forward. Whether it is the corroded, patina'd, preserved, restored, or blinged to the stratosphere; the only thing that matters is it is running and being enjoyed. I'd never foist my preferences on anyone, because the level we take our fan restos is what makes us ultimately happy. Just gotta figure out how to make my '06 cake into a lamp now. The pizza slice blades will make a nice clock. :p

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 02:28 am
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: This fan I gave to my parents for their 50th anniversary. You could say it functions pretty smooth...

That is awesome! O_O!
Thanks. Now I need to go see if I can do this with mine. Though, if mine won't do it, it could be the fan was a true basket case to begin with. I changed the rear bearing, but still need to swap the front bearing. It has no effects of a worn bearing, but I know it is a matter of time before it happens.  :hammer:

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 04:10 am
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: This fan I gave to my parents for their 50th anniversary. You could say it functions pretty smooth...

 That is awesome, Richard! I just love the AOUs. The AB1 I just started has really good bones and little previous user damage. However my first AOU resto started with an absolutely worn out rust bucket. The Oscillator engagement knob looks like Channellocks were taken to it at some point. I did as good of a job as I could straightening, balancing, and had the bearings sleeved, but didn't want to spend the money on custom brass pieces to replace the worn ones. Here is how mine runs having started out as a basket case. A nickel would not stay balanced passed a half turn, because of a one degree tilt of the Oscillator shaft. Since it ain't gonna win any fan show awards, I think I can live with it.  :hammer:


Last edited on Wed Dec 11th, 2019 04:32 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 05:21 am
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Richard Daugird
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Looks smooth as silk Alex. On mine, I couldn't just toss a nicle up there; I had to balance it just right, on a moving surface. Human error is a factor. But once it was balanced, it would stay, fan runs that smooth. I bet with some patience you could do it, give it another try.

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 05:30 am
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Richard Daugird
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I stand corrected, after watching the video on the computer and not my phone, I realized the nickle was balanced BEFORE I started the motor; Another testament to Ted's skill and the quality of manufacture of these old fans.

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 Posted: Wed Dec 11th, 2019 12:26 pm
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Kim Frank
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    The 1906 pancakes have two variants. First variant is like Alex's, with the earlier style motor housing. Then sometime during that year GE changed the housing to be more smooth. The 2nd variant 12 inch sticks and trunnions each have a different style rear cover thru the end of production in 1908. The later 1906 - '08 had some minor changes, mainly to the struts, but you might see the occasional shorter oil return on some of the sticks in '07.
    In order to place a fan in a particular year, I look at the serial number as my first guide. 1906 will be in the 238001-277000 range. 1907 will be in the 277001-314500 range, and the '08's will be 314500-325XXX. The latest recorded serial number I have is for a 1908 16 inch with 325389. CGE and BTH numbers fall within these ranges.
    Struts help to date the late cakes too. Early '06 used brass struts like the earlier years, then changed to steel with the same design. Then came the flat angled struts using a bevel head screw as the means of holding the cage in place. Then late in '08 production, the screws were changed to a large headed slotted screw. 1908 is a fairly scarce model in the GE survey, with only 10 desk fans and one exhaust fan listed.
 

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 Posted: Thu Dec 12th, 2019 04:13 am
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: Looks smooth as silk Alex. On mine, I couldn't just toss a nicle up there; I had to balance it just right, on a moving surface. Human error is a factor. But once it was balanced, it would stay, fan runs that smooth. I bet with some patience you could do it, give it another try.Thank you, Richard! May try again at some point, but there is a tiny bit of wear in the oscillator bell shaft pass-through, which is causing a one degree shift in axis(nothing enough to affect the function or make any noises).I spent a bit having the new sleeves pressed in and precision drilled in the bearings, but the extra cost to fix the oscillator housing wasn't worth it at the time, because I had jerry-rigged the original oscillator shaft by cutting it down and using an Emerson oscillator disc at the bottom. I had hoped the rear housing I bought at antiquefanparts would have no wear at that point. But, it had three times more play in it than mine did, so that is why I punched the oscillator shaft out of it and pressed the shaft and bell into my already restored fan. 
This is how I had to for a while. Worked great, but the un-originality kept bugging me.


Then after the pressing of shaft and bell, it makes me happy.





Last edited on Thu Dec 12th, 2019 04:19 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Dec 12th, 2019 04:16 am
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Alex Rushing
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Kim Frank wrote:     The 1906 pancakes have two variants. First variant is like Alex's, with the earlier style motor housing. Then sometime during that year GE changed the housing to be more smooth. The 2nd variant 12 inch sticks and trunnions each have a different style rear cover thru the end of production in 1908. The later 1906 - '08 had some minor changes, mainly to the struts, but you might see the occasional shorter oil return on some of the sticks in '07.
    In order to place a fan in a particular year, I look at the serial number as my first guide. 1906 will be in the 238001-277000 range. 1907 will be in the 277001-314500 range, and the '08's will be 314500-325XXX. The latest recorded serial number I have is for a 1908 16 inch with 325389. CGE and BTH numbers fall within these ranges.
    Struts help to date the late cakes too. Early '06 used brass struts like the earlier years, then changed to steel with the same design. Then came the flat angled struts using a bevel head screw as the means of holding the cage in place. Then late in '08 production, the screws were changed to a large headed slotted screw. 1908 is a fairly scarce model in the GE survey, with only 10 desk fans and one exhaust fan listed.
 
Thank you for the excellent information, Kim!
A lot of my research was conducted reading your threads on the subject. Not that I have anything against the smooth housings, I like the beauty rings around the castings of the motors up through when my fan was made. :)

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 Posted: Fri Dec 13th, 2019 08:37 am
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Zackri Higgins
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Congrats! GE is my favorite kind of cake. :D

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 Posted: Fri Dec 13th, 2019 01:05 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Zackri Higgins wrote: Congrats! GE is my favorite kind of cake. :D
Thank you, Zackri! :)


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