AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Stan Adams, Rod Rogers
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
R&M List 2610 — issues  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Apr 2nd, 2020 10:35 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
I purchased this little R&M List 2610 fan.  When I plugged it in, I put it on #1 and it ran slowly and oscillated but then I saw a little white smoke.  So I unplugged right away.  Is this bad news?  Cord is modern, industrial actually.  

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Apr 2nd, 2020 10:49 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Jim Humphrey
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Dec 13th, 2005
Location: Geneseo IL
Status: 
Offline
Chad, although the appearance of smoke of any color from a fan is seldom a cause for rejoicing, it isn't necessarily the end of the road either.  Where did the smoke seem to come from, the motor or the speed control or the headwire, or could you tell?  Speed one is direct line current, so if the motor had a heavy load from inadequate lubrication, the amps would go up and possibly overheat some of the wiring.  You're just going to have to take a look and see if something is obviously cooked.  The good news is that there are people hanging around here to can fix that sort of thing.  Jim

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Apr 2nd, 2020 10:53 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Brad Hughes
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Mon Nov 6th, 2017
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Had the same thing happen to a Menominee Staghorn.  Paul Graves was able to isolate a broken wire and repair.  Find a local motor guru like Paul or Rick Huckaby to name just a few. Maybe Pete Hahn in your neck of the woods.??   All may not be lost.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Apr 2nd, 2020 10:54 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
Jim,
Thanks for the reply!  The white smoke came from the motor housing. Wasn’t heavy, but enough to notice and say somethings not right.

Chad

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Apr 2nd, 2020 11:00 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
Brad,
I haven’t taken the fan apart yet.  But would a broken wire or something along those lines be obvious once it’s apart?  You can see the big yellow cord in the back.  Hoping this little guy isn’t ruined. Looks really good in all other areas.  Put a little mother’s polish on it and it already cleaned up pretty good without much effort.  I thought the 5 blade, and brass at that, was really cool looking.  






Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 02:50 am
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
I used the multimeter on the plug to check for continuity. My multimeter is a decent one but the leafs suck. But I did seem to get some readings on each speed. Is that a good sign?  It was bouncing around on the multimeter but that probably was me and my hands trying to hold the plug and leads. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 05:54 am
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
David Lewis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Jul 16th, 2019
Location: Montana USA
Status: 
Offline
How do the brushes look? Not sure that would cause the smoke but it would be an easy check.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 11:21 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Lane Shirey
AFCA Member


Joined: Wed Apr 30th, 2014
Location: York, Pennsylvania USA
Status: 
Offline
Chad Campbell wrote: I used the multimeter on the plug to check for continuity. My multimeter is a decent one but the leafs suck. But I did seem to get some readings on each speed. Is that a good sign?  It was bouncing around on the multimeter but that probably was me and my hands trying to hold the plug and leads. It’s hard to measure if the field coil is good on a brush motor fan by measuring at the plug, because it goes through the brushes and commutator.  That’s why the readings jump around.  You’re best to take off the motor cover, remove the brushes and measure directly across the field coil.  

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 01:28 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
David Lewis wrote: How do the brushes look? Not sure that would cause the smoke but it would be an easy check.
Dumb question - how do you tell if the brushes look good or bad?

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 02:09 pm
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
David Lewis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Jul 16th, 2019
Location: Montana USA
Status: 
Offline
The universal motors such as yours have carbon brushes that ride on a commutator. The brushes are essentially carbon sticks that are usually either round or rectangular. To inspect them, remove the two thimble like objects on the back of the motor. The ones on my R&M 3500 are held secure by set screws. I believe they'll just pull out. Some twisting and pulling may be necessary. A brush and a spring will be inside the thimble. Not sure how long a new one will be for your fan, but it definitely shouldn't be worn down to the spring. I'm guessing you'd want at least 1/4" of brush protruding from the spring. You can get new ones from McMaster- carr or if you have dimensions, Darryl Hudson can make them to spec. He might even have the specs for your model. Hope this helps.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 05:28 pm
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Jim Humphrey
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Dec 13th, 2005
Location: Geneseo IL
Status: 
Offline
Chad,


On the 2610, just unscrew the brush caps and beneath them you'll see a spring.  Depending on how much of the brushes is left, the spring may stand above the brush holder and you can just pull out the spring which normally brings the brush along with it.  If not, you'll have to reach down into the brush holder with a dental pick or something like that to grab the spring and bring it up to where you can pull it the rest of the way out.  If the brushes aren't being held by the springs, you can normally just turn the fan sideways and shake the brushes out.

Jim

Last edited on Fri Apr 3rd, 2020 05:30 pm by Jim Humphrey

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 01:03 am
  PMQuoteReply
12th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
I am finally working on this fan I got back in the spring. I purchased 2 new brushes/springs from Darryl.  When I opened the cap I see the spring. Should the spring pop right out or do I need to use the dental pick and force it out?  I gently used a pick and pulled at the spring but not really any movement. 


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 02:22 am
  PMQuoteReply
13th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Introduced to the market in 16, taken off the market for 21 season. 16-20.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 11:08 am
  PMQuoteReply
14th Post
Lane Shirey
AFCA Member


Joined: Wed Apr 30th, 2014
Location: York, Pennsylvania USA
Status: 
Offline
Chad Campbell wrote: I am finally working on this fan I got back in the spring. I purchased 2 new brushes/springs from Darryl.  When I opened the cap I see the spring. Should the spring pop right out or do I need to use the dental pick and force it out?  I gently used a pick and pulled at the spring but not really any movement. 



Often times the brush tubes get packed with oil and carbon dust, keeping the brushes from being removed easily. Sometimes you have to remove the rotor and then try to push them one way or the other until they free up.  Of course the tubes should be cleaned to remove the carbon residue as that can cause shorting  inside the motor housing. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 05:14 pm
  PMQuoteReply
15th Post
Steven P Dempsey
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue May 15th, 2012
Location: Clarksville, Virginia USA
Status: 
Offline
I would check the choke coil - they do fail, quite fragile I have one right now I replacing with a diode

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 05:17 pm
  PMQuoteReply
16th Post
Steven P Dempsey
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue May 15th, 2012
Location: Clarksville, Virginia USA
Status: 
Offline
2840 switch - nichrome windings broken in several places


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 07:33 pm
  PMQuoteReply
17th Post
Chad Campbell
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Nov 12th, 2019
Location: Greenville, South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for the feedback!  I'll give it a try, perhaps this weekend.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 08:34 pm
  PMQuoteReply
18th Post
Jim Kovar
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Feb 21st, 2011
Location:  Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline
Chad Campbell wrote: When I plugged it in,...  ...I saw a little white smoke.
Chad, "smoke" is the "essence of life" for old fans.

Without smoke, they will not run ("† fan"  :X).

Old fan motors were manufactured with a certain
amount (varies with manufacturer) of smoke
incorporated into their inner parts.

Some say that smoke to a fan is like a man's soul.

Without,...  may as well be dead.

The secret about fan smoke (the soul of a fan) is to
not let it out!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Dec 1st, 2020 08:55 pm
  PMQuoteReply
19th Post
William Dunlap
AFCA Member


Joined: Fri Jan 31st, 2014
Location: Kula, Maui, Hawaii USA
Status: 
Offline
When working on English cars, we could obtain genuine Lucas Wiring Harness smoke.


Search for GE, Westy, Emerson R&M replacement smoke?
Cheers,
Bill

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

Current time is 06:40 pm  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > R&M List 2610 — issues Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.2370 seconds (33% database + 67% PHP). 32 queries executed.