AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Stan Adams, Rod Rogers
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Century Model 91- Need help  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 03:55 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
I am new to this forum.  I have cleaned up and re-greased a 16 inch Hunter fan and a Manning -Bowman model 51 which I cleaned up and replaced the cord.
I just recently purchased a Century Fan Model 91and I need to replace the head wire ( I believe that is what it is called).  It is the wire that goes from the base of the fan to the motor.  This cloth wire is frayed and I see bare wire. I have tried searching on the forum but I can't seem to find any posts about this model.

My immediate problem is trying to free the rotor.  Accessing the oscillating gear box was pretty straight forward with the Hunter Fan and the Manning-Bowman but I am stymied with this Century model 91.  Any help regarding this fan would be greatly appreciated.  

Thank you.


Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 04:48 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
David Kilnapp
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Apr 17th, 2018
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts USA
Status: 
Offline
Welcome to the club! Would you kindly post some pictures of your fan please? That would be most helpful.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 04:56 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Thank you for your interest in assisting me.  Here are some pics.






I am excited to learn more about this fan.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 06:38 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
David Kilnapp
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Apr 17th, 2018
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts USA
Status: 
Offline
The first things I would do would be to remove the cage, then the blade and struts. This fan is more commonly known as a Century S2. I have restored S3’s and a Century skeletal fan. Remove the screws that hold the case together (3 or 4 on the back and some on the front of the case. The back of the oscillation gear housing unscrews counter clockwise (the two inch black cover across circular thing on the back of that fan). You’ll be able to see how the gears and the oscillation switch work when you take that rear cover off. The little on/off flag is held in place by a tiny set screw. Loosen that and the flag can be removed by pulling it up and out. There is a horizontal pin (rod) which goes from one side of the gear case to the other. The oscillation gears are on that rod. As I recall, there are set screws that hold that rod in position. Loosen those and use a nail set to push the Rod out sideways (it might be under two brass covers about the size of a penny on either side of the gear case). Those brass covers can be pried off with a utility knife as they are only pressed in place. Remove them to be cleaned and polished. Once the rear gear cover has been unscrewed and set aside you will see how the gears are arranged (the order) before you push the gear rod out sideways. That little on/off flag pushes on part of that horizontal rod to make the gears contact the end of the spindle which engages the oscillation. I’m going from memory at this point as it has been more than a year since I restored the S3. Once the case screws are removed, you can gently tap the end of the rotor spindle which should be in plain view inside the gear housing. That should push the case apart so you can remove the rotor. Then you can use the PVC pipe method to slide the stator out being careful to unscrew the threaded grommet that the headwires pass through in the back of the case first. Be careful NOT to break the plastic grommet which can become brittle with age. Don’t worry if you break it because replacements are available from members. Slide that grommet out of the way (I am presuming that you have already disconnected the head wires from the speed coil inside the base and marked the wires so you know where to connect them when you reassemble the speed coil in the base). Use the search function to look up the PVC pipe method for removing the stator. I bet this is clear as mud!? Go slow and keep track of all the little screws you remove. Once you have mastered this restoration, you can try and find a Century skeletal fan which uses a similar design but is much more elegant and desirable. I hope all this hasn’t discouraged you.
Here is what you will see when you take off that rear cap:


And below is the gear removed. The on/off piece pushes that groove you see on the right side.



Last edited on Thu Jul 30th, 2020 09:44 pm by David Kilnapp

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 07:21 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Thank you David. That is very helpful. I already had the cage and front piece off and had gone as far as I felt comfortable before I put it back together so as to not lose anything.
I was staring for a long time at that circular two inch piece on the back and had thoughts that it may be the key but I did not want to force anything in case I damaged something unnecessarily. This will save me all sorts of frustration

Also knowing those brass covers are meant to be pried off is very helpful.  

Your instructions contain no mud I find them clear and should be able to follow them.  Knowing that this fan is also known as an S2 now lets me search the forum for more information. Nothing was coming up on the forum for Model 91.

I will probably do no more that clean it up and make the wiring safe.  I kind of like the patina.

 I already blew out as much dust as I could with the front cover off. I took the bottom off and wiped away the dust and cobwebs and gave it a shot of contact cleaner. In fiddling around I opened up the enclosed arm that oscillates the fan and cleaned out the old grease with carburetor cleaner. I applied new grease ( I used the same stuff I used on my Kitchen aid mixer). I then oiled the front and back oil ports.  At this point I did do something I probably shouldn't have but I was too excited to see if the fan worked so after all that I taped the bare spots of the head wire with electricians tape and plugged it into a power bar. I flipped the switch on the power bar being ready to switch it off if I saw or smelled anything bad.  well, it hummed to life and despite my frustration with the gearbox I was happy to stare at the spinning shaft for 20 minutes.  

I put the blades back on and let it run for another 20 minutes, more staring.  It is very quiet and didn't seem to get hot.

Again, thank you for this assistance I will post my progress, if any.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Jul 30th, 2020 08:05 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
David Kilnapp
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Apr 17th, 2018
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts USA
Status: 
Offline
I’m so glad I didn’t overwhelm you. You sound like you have all the skills to do any restoration. If you decide to replace headwires you should use Tony Clayton’s wire. Great stuff and very pliable so it’s very easy to work with. I hope your soldering skills are up to par. Just be very very careful when you start pulling on the headwires where they attach to the stator. They’ll break if you bend them one time too many. And they will break very close to the stator and that’s not good. I’ve learned to stabilize the head wires with liquid tape where they exit the stator before I start messing with them! Below is the Skeletal that I mentioned and my S3 which I gave as a gift.
Skeletal:





S3:






Last edited on Thu Jul 30th, 2020 09:40 pm by David Kilnapp

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 01:44 am
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:Quick update:

The back came off easier then I expected.  I put tape on some vice grips to protect the cap from getting marred locked them on and that first little movement had angels singing.  Pure joy.  a few more turns and I was in.  






That joy was tempered by the removal of the brass buttons.  I was starting to doubt that they could be pried off but gentle persistence paid off.  I tapped out the rod and had the gears out.  

I was picking cruddy grease out of the gears as I slowly put the above into action and I found these:



I believe they are the fiber washers I have read about on the forum.  These Pieces had all collected themselves on the left hand side of the horizontal gear but I imagine two could have gone on either side of this horizontal gear. I will search the forum to see what size they are, where I can get them and where they should be placed.  Oh, and I did get the rotor out.

The grommet that is around the head wire turns but doesn't come out.  My head is swimming right know so I think I have to put things back together so I don't lose track of where everything goes.  When I track down the information on the washers and have them in front of me I can go back in and deal with the head wire and the stator and all that business.  Whooosh! What a day.



Attached Image (viewed 140 times):

IMG_4968.jpg

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 10:49 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
David Kilnapp
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Apr 17th, 2018
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts USA
Status: 
Offline
Those are indeed fiber washers; easily replaced and available. I get them in assorted sizes from Amazon.com. You are doing fine so keep going but be warned you may contract the fan 🐜!

Last edited on Fri Jul 31st, 2020 10:50 am by David Kilnapp

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 11:17 am
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Lane Shirey
AFCA Member


Joined: Wed Apr 30th, 2014
Location: York, Pennsylvania USA
Status: 
Offline
Be very careful in disassembling that fan. It is made mostly of potmetal.  Century pot metal is known to crumble if it’s disturbed in any way, rendering the fan useless.  Most of us that restore fans shy away from the potmetal models. 

It’s not made of cast iron, like the S3 that Dave mentioned.   If not sure, use a magnet to test the various parts.  If it doesn’t stick, it’s potmetal.  
But best of success with your restoration.  

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 06:10 pm
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Do you have an amazon link for fiber washers you could share?  An  assortment of washers could be helpful as I think I may need some for my Hunter fan.  
I think the disintegrated washers have something to do with why the on/off switch doesn't work.  It just stays in oscillating mode.  Do you know where they should be placed?

As to the fan bug I fear I may have already contracted it and am exhibiting symptoms. 


Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 07:10 pm
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Richard Daugird
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Sep 12th, 2017
Location: Texas City, Between Hou. & Galveston, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
These are metric, I need a kit of Imperial sizes myself, don't see them on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PMD1PSV/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Last edited on Fri Jul 31st, 2020 07:12 pm by Richard Daugird

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Fri Jul 31st, 2020 10:42 pm
  PMQuoteReply
12th Post
David Kilnapp
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Apr 17th, 2018
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts USA
Status: 
Offline
I don't see any fiber washers in there. Try eliminating the washers and see if the oscillation turns on and off like it should. There are two little ball bearings in the spindle which, as I recall, somehow have something to do with the oscillation.

As I recall, the washers go on the far left. Tell you what, I'll remove the back of my skeletal and take a picture for you to reference. Hold on while I do that for you.

Last edited on Fri Jul 31st, 2020 10:57 pm by David Kilnapp

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sat Aug 1st, 2020 01:07 am
  PMQuoteReply
13th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Richard Daugird wrote: These are metric, I need a kit of Imperial sizes myself, don't see them on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PMD1PSV/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thank you. I will look into these. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Sat Aug 1st, 2020 01:10 am
  PMQuoteReply
14th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
David Kilnapp wrote: I don't see any fiber washers in there. Try eliminating the washers and see if the oscillation turns on and off like it should. There are two little ball bearings in the spindle which, as I recall, somehow have something to do with the oscillation.

As I recall, the washers go on the far left. Tell you what, I'll remove the back of my skeletal and take a picture for you to reference. Hold on while I do that for you.
Actually the washers had already eliminated themselves. They were in pieces stuck in the cruddy grease. That is why I thought they may have had something to do with making the on/off switch operational.  I will probably order an assortment of washers and experiment.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Aug 3rd, 2020 05:41 pm
  PMQuoteReply
15th Post
Angela Sanagki
Guest
 

Joined: Fri Jul 17th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
I am continuing the repair of my S2 century fan but can't seem to get the grommet out of the fan case.  I tried unscrewing it but it just turns and turns.  I even tried the opposite direction in case it was reverse thread.  same result.  Has anyone had the same problem or do I have a non-threaded grommet?
I do not want to start forcing anything for fear I may break something.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

Current time is 10:42 am  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Century Model 91- Need help Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1849 seconds (19% database + 81% PHP). 29 queries executed.