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Challenge Accepted Patrick Ray!  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 03:40 am
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Alex Rushing
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So, I had recently done some cage resto for Mr. Ray, and I believe he was pleased with it. As he offered to send me a fan for free. But, the stipulations were that I get it restored at some point and create a thread about it. So, this is the progress thread for the project.
Here is what I pulled out of the box. Blade was not attached, so popped it on for the photo. 



At first glance.....oh my.....there is a lot going on here.
1. He didn't tell me it was a Clamshell, but he remembered I mentioned wanting one sometime back.
2. The cage is broken and missing a wire.
3. He warned me the magic smoke had been let out of this one and it would need a rewind.

Otherwise it is a pretty cool fan! I'll have to get a data tag from Donald Coleman, and locate a second greaser for it, but those in time.

First thing I wanted to do was make it run. Upon inspection, the old tape and windings were like an overcooked baked potato. Unwrapping the windings confirmed it had been a smoker. However, once unwound a little, I picked up 42ohms per set. Looking about this was correct. I carefully sprayed varnish all over the uncovered windings, then wrapped them in friction tape. Rebuilt the brush conductors and tensioned the brush springs down. Resurfaced the commutator, and tied the stator all back up and soldered it together.

Soooooo.......it runs.....kind of......but....I learned a valuable lesson. Once the factory magnet field foil wire insulation is trashed, the windings need to be rewound with new wire. So an afternoon wasted...or was it? Nope... conformed the armature was good, and that the bearings are salvageable, and the blade(after I straightened it out a bit) was not trashed.
Here are the photos showing the stupid act of trying to save old burned windings.












Cleaned the laminations while I was at it.











Emmy grommet, because it fits.



So, will it run? Still getting 42ohm per winding with brushes out.


Yes, it'll run.


But, 20 seconds in it slowed to a crawl and stopped.
I checked the windings and one set was now a dead short.  Dang.....pushed it around with a pick and got 42 again. Doused with a ton a varnish and left overnight.

So today I get home and the varnish is dry. Time to see what happens. It started up and ran for a bit, then I noticed it drawing 2x the power it should. Not good.


Now, after a little run time, the readings on one field or the other drop to 16ohm. The field windings are shorting. Turns out varnish doesn't work AFTER the windings are toast. Not well anyway. This is a viable resto candidate. I ordered 5000' of 32g magnet field wire and plan to rewind the two little poles. I know I didn't need that much, but it was dirt cheap.
Gotta get my feet wet with motor winding anyway, and I understand the motor theory better now I have done this testing.

Patrick, thank you again! This should be a fun, and productive project!

I may solder the cage back up and solder the missing wire in, or make a cage out of the 25' of brass half-hard wire I have on hand for cage resto.

Blades: I am likely going to get them as flat and straight as possible, or buy a sheet of brass and cut new wings out.

My mood for projects changes sometimes, so we'll see. Only things left are to find a second top greaser and get a data plate.

Thanks for following along, y'all! :)

Last edited on Thu Sep 24th, 2020 03:53 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 12:27 pm
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Patrick Ray
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Really glad you are enjoying this challenge fan. And I'll looking forward to if you decide to keep the steel cage and blade or if you bling it with brass. Can't say I've ever seen anyone do that yet. Either way you go, I'm sure you'll turn out another great restoration!

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 02:46 pm
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Noah Britt
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You shouldn't have any trouble at all rewinding that motor; it looks really simple. 

I have a question: How did you get the stator out, and was it easy? I've been working on my Menominee Clamshell, (although not much in the past week because I'm waiting on testing some stuff). However, I did try the pipe trick to try to get the stator out, and it didn't work. I guess the stator isn't massive enough to come out that way. I also tried placing a screwdriver on the back of the laminations and hammering on the end of the screwdriver, but that didn't work either; it seems to be stuck pretty good in there.

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 09:03 pm
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Sean Campbell
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Very cool little fan Alex! I’m partial to them myself. I will warn that they run extremely fast and CAN walk off a table without proper precautions. I’ve heard members refer to the Clamshell as a “weed wacker on crack”. XD Here is a picture with two of mine. One is original, the other is blinged out, so the potential is definitely there!


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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 09:20 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Noah Britt wrote: You shouldn't have any trouble at all rewinding that motor; it looks really simple. 

I have a question: How did you get the stator out, and was it easy? I've been working on my Menominee Clamshell, (although not much in the past week because I'm waiting on testing some stuff). However, I did try the pipe trick to try to get the stator out, and it didn't work. I guess the stator isn't massive enough to come out that way. I also tried placing a screwdriver on the back of the laminations and hammering on the end of the screwdriver, but that didn't work either; it seems to be stuck pretty good in there.
Mine came right out after taking the brush conductor screws out. So I'm not sure what might be causing yours to be stuck.

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 09:23 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Sean Campbell wrote: Very cool little fan Alex! I’m partial to them myself. I will warn that they run extremely fast and CAN walk off a table without proper precautions. I’ve heard members refer to the Clamshell as a “weed wacker on crack”. XD Here is a picture with two of mine. One is original, the other is blinged out, so the potential is definitely there!


Oooooo.... nice!
Thank you Sean!

They're truly awful running fans..haha
But, the design was so unique it was on my "to get an example" list. Patrick just happened to have one for a challenge resto. Haha

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 09:24 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Patrick Ray wrote: Really glad you are enjoying this challenge fan. And I'll looking forward to if you decide to keep the steel cage and blade or if you bling it with brass. Can't say I've ever seen anyone do that yet. Either way you go, I'm sure you'll turn out another great restoration!
Thanks Patrick! :)
It has been fun thus far, and cannot wait to get it rewound. Wondering now if it is supposed to be very inefficient? Draws 85W when running "smooth"(relatively).

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 Posted: Thu Sep 24th, 2020 11:22 pm
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Noah Britt
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Alex Rushing wrote:Mine came right out after taking the brush conductor screws out. So I'm not sure what might be causing yours to be stuck.

OK, I didn't see those two screws that keep the stator in. I can't believe I never noticed those!







Thanks for the clue!


These Clamshells are really bizarre if you've never worked on one before. When I opened it up the first time, and it just split in half, that was really weird. It's not that I didn't know that's how it comes apart, I'd just never seen pictures of one split open.

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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2020 12:47 am
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Sean Campbell
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Yeah, Menominee fans are straight up bizarre, but that’s part of their charm!

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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2020 01:27 am
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Patrick Ray
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@Alex  No one said the Clamshell was a smooth runner. That's what our Emerson's are for! 😋. They are just a cool quirky fan.

@Noah. Splitting these open is kinda odd. I remember my first one I worked on, I've had a few.  It's like shucking a real clam. Just split it in two. Pretty easy fans to work on with their simplicity.

@Sean. I love your blinged out Clamshell. Maybe we can twist Alex's arm into blinging his with BB/BC!




Last edited on Fri Sep 25th, 2020 03:06 am by Patrick Ray

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 Posted: Fri Sep 25th, 2020 02:32 am
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Alex Rushing
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Noah Britt wrote: Alex Rushing wrote:Mine came right out after taking the brush conductor screws out. So I'm not sure what might be causing yours to be stuck.

OK, I didn't see those two screws that keep the stator in. I can't believe I never noticed those!







Thanks for the clue!


These Clamshells are really bizarre if you've never worked on one before. When I opened it up the first time, and it just split in half, that was really weird. It's not that I didn't know that's how it comes apart, I'd just never seen pictures of one split open.

:clap: Glad it worked out!

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 Posted: Wed Oct 7th, 2020 03:31 am
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Alex Rushing
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A little update. And another skill that I've not tried yet.
Made brass wings for the Clam. And since the brass stock In ordered was so flimsy, I cut them from early Emerson wings that were damaged at the spider mount.

And made a point of getting the Parker and Patent stamps in the tiny pizza slices! Will make this a truly unique custom fan!










Rough polish for the moment until the holes are drilled.



And I've got the stuff out to work on a cage! Maybe some evening this week.


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 Posted: Wed Oct 7th, 2020 01:14 pm
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Patrick Ray
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Way to reuse old blades! Plus I love the detail of keeping the old stamps. You are on a roll with this project and I can't wait to see the result. Get the wire yet for the motor rewind?

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 Posted: Thu Oct 8th, 2020 04:55 am
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Alex Rushing
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Patrick Ray wrote: Way to reuse old blades! Plus I love the detail of keeping the old stamps. You are on a roll with this project and I can't wait to see the result. Get the wire yet for the motor rewind?
Thanks Patrick! Since it is going full custom, I'm going to put some odd touches on it. Nothing crazy, but stuff maybe us fan folk would enjoy seeing. :)

Wouldn't you know it is now FRIDAY expected delivery. The first one was "lost". Sheesh.
So, I'm sourcing some peening rivets for the blades. Should be able to spray the hub and mount the wings soon.

But, while waiting. I went ahead and began the cage process. Hand bent, by eye, each piece needed to make a TWELVE s-wire drop ring cage. I decided against making the dips in the front ring, as I'm going to drop a dab of flux and solder in each joint anyway.

Idea came from playing around with adding an s-wire between two on the broke cage for fun.
Loved the look, so went with it.



Then the fun part of making the s-wires.


Smaller center ring, but same size front/rear rings to make the drops. And the V brackets.
I'm undecided whether to point-to-point solder like the Marelli cage, or use collars. Well see, but the rings are smaller than the Marelli rings, so may have to at least solder one ring(wrap) over the point-to-point.



This will be a pretty tough project, but might really take it to the next level.  :hammer:

Last edited on Thu Oct 8th, 2020 05:00 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Oct 8th, 2020 12:47 pm
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Patrick Ray
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12 s-wires on a little Clamshell cage? I think that qualifies it as an OSHA cage! Looking great so far!

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 Posted: Thu Oct 8th, 2020 05:42 pm
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Sean Campbell
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Sounds like it will look great! Part of me can’t help but wonder what it would look like with a large open ring 12 wire cage similar to IC, early Diehl, Peerless, or early R&M...:wondering:

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 Posted: Fri Oct 9th, 2020 12:43 am
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Alex Rushing
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Patrick Ray wrote: 12 s-wires on a little Clamshell cage? I think that qualifies it as an OSHA cage! Looking great so far!
LOL. Indeed it'll be safer considering weed whacker on crack. Though I will be putting a have wave bridge rectifier diode in to slow it down.
Thanks Patrick!

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 Posted: Fri Oct 9th, 2020 12:45 am
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Alex Rushing
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Sean Campbell wrote: Sounds like it will look great! Part of me can’t help but wonder what it would look like with a large open ring 12 wire cage similar to IC, early Diehl, Peerless, or early R&M...:wondering:I'll look unique. :DI'm hoping it looks good. The way I'm making it, I could cut six wires off and turn it to a six wire. But, I think the fan is odd enough the 12 wire cage will be cool. :D

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 Posted: Fri Oct 9th, 2020 05:46 am
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Alex Rushing
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Time to have some fun.


Counted the old windings at 310. 310 on my form was 31ohms. Needed closer to 40, so ended up at 400 wraps on the same form, which was just a hand sanitizer bottle. Haha
Guess it was a bit smaller than the original form? Oh well, I read the coils at 39ohms each. It'll have to do, but will rewind at 430 wraps if these don't function properly. 



Paper towel and string to tie off and slip off.


First coil with 400 wraps.


Neatened up and hand formed.


Test fit, and it is nice and clean looking, while still clearing the core.


1110 wraps later(310 on coil reading to far off and 400 per coil on each new wrapped set).


Will be wiring and testing the stator Saturday night, as well as soldering the cage pieces for the twelve s-wire drop ring cage.

Line wire will be this old cotton green antique-style stuff I cut off another fan. A line switch will be put in place as well. In the base will be a half wave bridge rectifier diode to slow the fan down to a useable speed.


I do need to find another grease cup soon, as I just have the one at the moment.

If the motor runs satisfactory, it'll get slated for filling, prepping, and painting. I love these in black, so will be going to my regular advanced formula for the casings and blade hub.

Last thing will be to source a brass type 150 data tag.

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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 02:11 am
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Alex Rushing
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First major hurdle has been knocked down!
Thank you again, Patrick for having confidence I could do this! I know it isn't a hard one to do, but it is something I didn't think I would be able to do. Your encouragement is appreciated!




Got it nice, neat, and clean looking. Left some stripes of new wire showing to remember it is where the winding stuff began. :)










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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 02:32 am
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Patrick Ray
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Nice work Alex! I knew you'd be able to tackle this project. And I see the can of Rust-Oleum lurking in the background, waiting its turn! The Clam lives again!

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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 03:40 am
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Alex Rushing
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Thank you Patrick! This project has propelled me a few inches farther into the medium-high echelon of fan resto.
The appliance epoxy was for a customer resto(9" stationary Whiz) recently so he could get the fan sooner. I'll be using the deeper Advanced Formula Gloss Black on this one!
Gonna need a lot of filler work, but no biggie. :)

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2020 07:53 am
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Alex Rushing
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Next level cage stuff right here:
Starting out.


Pieces shaped by eye.


Got the wire ends around the center loop.


Rough ring assembly and solder.


Made the rear mounting ring.


Caught it in the buffing wheel and smashed my hand.


Put the stuff down and came back last night. Turned out better, since the other became oblong when put on fan anyway. Smashed hand and wad of brass paid off at least.


Rough cleanup of cage front, and alignment.


Ready to make love.


Insane? Yes. Crazy? Probably. Super cool? You betcha.






Going to fill, sand, and prep for paint later today.
Then once the brass pins come in, I'll have to learn to pin wings on without deforming them. Hopefully it'll work out like the crazy-cage. LOL


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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2020 12:36 pm
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Patrick Ray
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Wow! Another beautiful cage! You really are taking this challenge to the next level. When sending this fan to you, I thought it would just be another well restored Clamshell. But now you've truly went and taken it to a whole new level! 

Hope your hand is alright. That's the reason why I haven't tried to buff a cage yet. I don't want it to turn into a brass weed wacker!

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2020 12:54 am
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Alex Rushing
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Patrick Ray wrote: Wow! Another beautiful cage! You really are taking this challenge to the next level. When sending this fan to you, I thought it would just be another well restored Clamshell. But now you've truly went and taken it to a whole new level! 

Hope your hand is alright. That's the reason why I haven't tried to buff a cage yet. I don't want it to turn into a brass weed wacker!


Thank you Patrick!

So, I carefully worked on the wings today.

Here is the spider after wings removed.


Shaping them up using an old steel one as a template.


Blades polished on one side.


Weighing, filing, and polishing the edges.


Tapped the spider for 6-32 to temporarily screw the wings on for fine tuning.


My official full wing making and wing swap.


Kept the Emerson stamps as a neat nod to the brass' past. :)

Testing the completed cage(sans final shape adjustment and polishing the whole cage) and blades(temporarily screwed to the spider).



I am beginning to become giddy about this!
Ordered a brass Menominee motor tag(with an odd curvature that will likely work on this fan) from AFP.


Will determine a permanent wing attachment soon! I may grind the slots off the screws, put them in with loctite, and use pliers to crank them down. Then snip off with flush cutters.
I had planned on pins, but i have all I need to make the slotted screws look like rivets by grinding the slots out and polishing them.  :clap:

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2020 01:11 pm
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Carlos Alvarado
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Dang Alex this sucks. I'm over here all proud that I took off a stator. You over here doing your own windings, cage, blades..  Love your passion. This fan is going to be bad posterior!
Im especially interested in the tactic you are using on the blades. Can't wait to see it done.  

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 Posted: Tue Oct 13th, 2020 05:18 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Carlos Alvarado wrote: Dang Alex this sucks. I'm over here all proud that I took off a stator. You over here doing your own windings, cage, blades..  Love your passion. This fan is going to be bad posterior!
Im especially interested in the tactic you are using on the blades. Can't wait to see it done.  

As you should be proud to have removed the stator! I've been at the fan repair/resto for nearly 14 months now. Using my personal philosophies, I should have been doing some of it months ago. Just let the anxiety of ruining things get in the way. Truth be told, if it isn't working, or is jacked up, there isn't much to lose by pushing the envelope. The Clam was a great candidate for skill building. I do not think it would have been wise to try and start stator coils on something like a big motor Emerson with 18 winding sets of different gauge wire. Haha

Cage-wise, I got my feet wet with the Marelli cage build. Then have been repairing cages here and there (how I got acquainted with Patrick). Next step seemed to be a rather complex cage endeavor. I've got plans on rewinding a bad 6250 Emmy shaded pole stator with four windings. Baby step indeed, but more complex than the two pole series universal motor rewind.

The blades are something I've needed to tackle, and the small size and configuration of these little pizza slices seemed a good starting point for wing making. :)

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2020 02:21 am
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Patrick Ray
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Baby steps Los! We all started somewhere. It's just that Alex is in the express lane leaving us in the dust. At least you have your own powder coat setup. I knew Alex had the capabilities to turn this Clamshell from what it was into the beauty it's turning out to be. Alex just needed that nudge to get into new avenues of restoration like windings and making blades.

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 Posted: Wed Oct 14th, 2020 04:26 am
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Alex Rushing
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Patrick Ray wrote: Baby steps Los! We all started somewhere. It's just that Alex is in the express lane leaving us in the dust. At least you have your own powder coat setup. I knew Alex had the capabilities to turn this Clamshell from what it was into the beauty it's turning out to be. Alex just needed that nudge to get into new avenues of restoration like windings and making blades.
I gotta thank you for the nudge and confidence in my work, Patrick! Thank you!
About the blades!

How do ya like these puppies?




And some process photos.




Sanded and polished the screws.




Screwed in with Loctite and cranked with compound pliers.


Flush cutters.


Cut and filed each one.




Finish polish on blades.


Front was spray painted, but I had to hand paint the back of the finished spider.


Balanced out perfectly.
I am stoked now!

Rest of the work over the weekend.

Last edited on Wed Oct 14th, 2020 04:26 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2020 04:21 am
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Alex Rushing
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Gonna have to get some Bondo in this iron!
One side looks pretty good, like filling/sanding primer would work.


Other side? Not so much. But, not to bad. Just gotta remember to use Bondo outside, as I think it stinks, though it has been years since using it. Photo doesn't show how deep the casting flaws/pits are.


Should be able to pick some up this weekend. Once filled, I'll start painting.

The Vaseline cup situation it a conundrum. Only one it present, and it is steel. If both steel ones were there, no big deal, but one grease cup won't do.
Patrick had a great idea to see if Darryl would make two matching brass grease cups to go with the "Glam Clam" look.
So will see about the cost for that. I believe that is the last hurdle, except the feet.

Does anyone know of BMY feet fit these? I would take one out of my BMY, but they're a real PITA to put back in(on the one I restored anyway).

Last edited on Thu Oct 15th, 2020 04:22 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2020 12:18 pm
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Patrick Ray
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I hate the smell of Bondo or any filler of the type. I like to use a light weight filler or glazing putty as I find Bondo is like a rock trying to carve it down. Granted, you don't have much to fill there and it shouldn't be too hard to do. Just when I'm slopping it on the side of a car, I'm there forever trying to sand Bondo.

I used the same feet on my Clamshell that I used on my BMY. So, yes, they fit. 

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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2020 03:18 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Thank you for the tips and info, Patrick!Luckily, I'll be taking a random orbit sander to it. Not something we can do with cars after a point. O_o

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 Posted: Thu Oct 15th, 2020 06:29 pm
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William Dunlap
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Metal glaze is what the pro's use. Smells the same as Bondo, but is much easier to apply then sand when cured. Also, it doesn't shrink under your nice paint jobs like Bondo does.
Cheers,
Bill

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 Posted: Fri Oct 16th, 2020 06:06 am
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Alex Rushing
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William Dunlap wrote: Metal glaze is what the pro's use. Smells the same as Bondo, but is much easier to apply then sand when cured. Also, it doesn't shrink under your nice paint jobs like Bondo does.
Cheers,
Bill
Thank you, Bill!Will order some soon! The non-shrink is most definitely appealing! I forgot bondo can do that. O_o

I was allowed to take the base and fill it at work with industrial cyanoacrylate and accelerator today (well, yesterday - Thursday).

Then sanded it smooth at home with a random orbit like I do with all my fans.

Then the casting flash in the vents began to bother me a smidgen. Got out the ole' rotary tool and went at it, and sanded the grinds fairly smooth. Also bolted the housing together tightly and sanded the miniscule ridges (in places) smooth as possible.
Wire wheeled and sprayed the inside of the motor case, which I just started doing three restos ago. Before I cleaned and sprayed the motor cases insides with electrical varnish, but that stuff is to expensive to be doing that. :imao

So, black inside, smooth exterior, uniform and smooth vents. I will likely spray it tomorrow.
Here is the only issue;

I have got to get started on some customer restos before the deadline is around the corner. I'll be using Appliance Epoxy for a 24 hour handling time and assembly Saturday night.
My go-to rattle-tat-tat is the glassy(as much as spray cans can be) takes days to handle. Need it done Saturday night. Maybe with all the brass and such, it won't be a source of discontentment.
Appliance Epoxy turned out rather well on a customer's fan recently. He needed it shipped before the cure time for Advanced spray.

Sorry for rambling. I get scatter brained thinking about a dozen things at once!

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 Posted: Fri Oct 16th, 2020 06:13 am
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Alex Rushing
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Some update pics of fill prep.
Pits filled, sanded, and rest of iron sanded.


Cleaning the vent flash. Even the bottom vents..haha






Insides painted, and a sneak peak at fan #4 I've not posted about on the forum yet. :D


Dried. Gotta remember to put black heatshrink on the grey stator wire I used, to match.


Split to cure, and the AE paint to be used. Probably enough for 3 heavy coats.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 16th, 2020 12:13 pm
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Patrick Ray
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I seem to recall a body guy I used to know using a product called All Metal as a metal filler.

I noticed the obscene amount of casting flash in the vent holes on my Clamshell. Even though I didn't repaint mine, there was so much thin flash, I was able to break out a fair amount of it. Looks much better now.

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 Posted: Fri Oct 16th, 2020 01:21 pm
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Carlos Alvarado
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That is an interesting fan design. Alex putting in some ot on this bad boy wow! Where in the world do you guys find this stuff? Keep me in mind if you guys find one. Would love to own one.
I've been experimenting with plumbers solder for water pipes to fill in metals. You flux the area, heat with a propane torch, fill in, build up, sand smooth. Silver brazing works too but you need lots of heat. In my case I need it to withstand atleast 450 degrees when hot flocking for powder so I'm afraid the plumbers solder would melt. But I'm with you guys, I do not like working with bondo type fillers.  

These pictures just makes me want to reach and grab the parts and get to work. So motivating! Can't wait to get to you guys skill level. 

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 Posted: Fri Oct 16th, 2020 04:49 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Carlos Alvarado wrote: That is an interesting fan design. Alex putting in some ot on this bad boy wow! Where in the world do you guys find this stuff? Keep me in mind if you guys find one. Would love to own one.
I've been experimenting with plumbers solder for water pipes to fill in metals. You flux the area, heat with a propane torch, fill in, build up, sand smooth. Silver brazing works too but you need lots of heat. In my case I need it to withstand atleast 450 degrees when hot flocking for powder so I'm afraid the plumbers solder would melt. But I'm with you guys, I do not like working with bondo type fillers.  

These pictures just makes me want to reach and grab the parts and get to work. So motivating! Can't wait to get to you guys skill level. 


Thanks man! Definitely some after work going into this one. Admittedly I work on the cleaner stuff inside the house between messaging, Chicago P.D/How it's Made/Build it Bigger/Law & Order SVU, and playing with my dog. The dirty work happens on the weekends usually, but I used half of my lunch break Wednesday to wire wheel the paint off at work.

The cyanoacrylate filling is super easy and the glue doesn't shrink or expand like Gorilla glue does. Super glue is a brand name for cyanoacrylate, but not as good as the stuff at work. I have aerosol accelerator to dry it immediately. I have literally painted stuff 10 minutes after filling a hole using that technique.
For sure won't survive a powder coat though.

Where do I get fans? Barring a fellow member helping me out like Patrick and Sean have, I pay heavy money for boat anchors on eBay to turn into cream puffs. :imao

Locally it is a wasteland of fans. Just mid century junkers usually. Not thay they are bad fans, but ones locally have most often been ran until the shaft wiggles 1/64" in the bearing. Makes a terrible noise. O_o

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 Posted: Sat Oct 17th, 2020 05:59 am
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Alex Rushing
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I had tried the Appliance Epoxy, but the finish just wasn't going to cut it with all the work done.Went ahead and took off the AE and put on Advanced. Now I'm happy!





Since I need this dry enough to handle Saturday night, I have them over a 1500 watt electric radiator.


Last edited on Sat Oct 17th, 2020 06:18 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Sat Oct 17th, 2020 11:58 am
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Carlos Alvarado
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I tried to sneak in to a Chicago pd set one time and got kicked out.. lol it's hard for an out of work actor like myself with no acting talent to get an acting job. Hahaha I don't even watch TV anymore. Youtube has some quality people putting out great content. This old Tony, aVe, The Apocaliptic Inventor, a cool guy with a fan channel who put a bunch of fans in his bedroom and turned them all on. That was awsome! My kids loved that...
Im SO glad you went with the better paint. You put in too much hard work to just end it with that AE. 

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