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Oiling GE Box fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Tue Jan 25th, 2011 04:29 pm
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Tom Zapf
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and one more thing, for those who have never taken one of these motors apart, the GE specific motors for their name brand fans are a world apart from the "export" motors they supplied to Vernco, Sears, Frigid/Vornado, Lakewood and other brands. The "Fireball" motor you refer to here was the "export" motor used in many brands, and the one that had the fire problem was not the 2 speed, 3 speed or 2 speed reversible motor, but only the 3 speed reversible motor according to my knowledgeable friends. The GE motor that is shown on this fan is a fancy looking version of the 1954 original motor that was only used in GE labelled fans up to the mid 1970's when the last of the 5 wing GE fans was discontinued. The "Export" motor was a standard design with a rotor on a shaft, held in place between bushings in the front and rear motor caps. Very common. The GE-Only motors were entirely different. The finned rotor was attached to the shaft only at the front, and the motors had a single long bearing attached to the motor housing at the rear, and which extended almost to the front of the motor. It was not supported anywhere except the rear as the motor housing was a solid cast unit, with no motor "caps" at each end. The finned rotor and shaft are only held into the motor by the "C" clip at the back end of the shaft. If it did not have that you could just slide the blade the rotor and shaft right out. Once assembled, the rear oil cavity was filled and the cap glued on and you cant take the rotor and shaft out without popping that cap off. The fancy motor design here to the housing did not last long. It was created with the Light Blue Spruce window fan with the sunburst grille and had a casting to include a housing for the switch. The standard box fans had the controls mounted on the side and continued with the gray motor design that had started in '54. This fan here was a super economy fan which is why the motor is attached to the grille and there is no venturi housing inside as well. The window fan had a steel blade that had noticeable bends in it while this fan has the standard GE blade. This design was very short lived and GE discontinued this motor style but continued to use the original 1954 style motor through the end of the 5 blade window and box fan run in the 70s (with some modifications)

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 Posted: Wed Jan 26th, 2011 04:45 am
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Justin Walker
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Lets see how long this last.

Attached Image (viewed 1055 times):

GEDC0381.JPG

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 Posted: Wed Jan 26th, 2011 03:58 pm
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Tom Zapf
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that is a lot of bearing length to get impregnated oil in to. The experts say that if you take it apart you need to clean out the long squiggly passages on the shaft as they do gunk up. if it is working better then you are on your way. good work. the rpms on GE's tend to be slow on low and medium as others have said. enjoy it!

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