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New member, first project. Any input would be appreciated  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 08:35 am
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William Layfield
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Joined: Thu Dec 31st, 2020
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Hey guys new to the club, have a few questions. I have a robbin meyers oscillating fan I want to restore I've already disassembled it to clean up, parts seem ok minus some wire decay and some surface corrosion. The model number plate is too far gone to get a model number but I bought a generic rebuild kit off eBay with the wires and wick. I'm thinking of sandblasting all the parts I can. Do you have any advise for a noob? Tha la in advance 

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 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 10:35 am
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Lane Shirey
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Welcome to the forum.  Most aspects of restoration have been covered here at one time or another.  You can learn a lot by using the search function to look for past posts.  That’s a good place to start.  Many fans are similar enough that even if the post isn’t about your fan exactly, the info may be useable.  

Asking how to restore a fan is a little like asking a mechanic how to fix a car.  You’ll need basic electrical, mechanical and refinishing skills,  but with patience, it’s not that hard.  Take lots of pics as you disassemble so you know how it goes back together. Put nuts and bolts and small parts in ziplock backs or a parts organizer and mark where they went.  That helps when reassembling.  

If you get stuck, post questions here with pictures of what you’re struggling with.  There’s sure to be someone that will help you out. 

Best of success with the restoration!

Cheers, 

Lane

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 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 05:56 pm
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William Layfield
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Thanks for the reply. I am indeed a mechanic. I work on f15 fighter jets. Whoo lol. I have been using the search function and also bagging and tagging the hardware and taking lots of pics. I'll post my progress pics as I go. Thanks again!

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 Posted: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 11:15 pm
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David Northam
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Those R&M fans are actually quite nice. I had the 16-inch version for years and still have a 12-inch version. Because these are considered relatively common fans, I have "refurbished" mine using rattle-can spray paint with pretty decent results. I still disassembled mine, cleaned the parts, used primer on much of it and then a top coat in gloss black with a matt-finish on the blades.

They run well, move a decent amount of air and generally do it quietly. One quick note, you posted in the post-1950 section (which is fine), but just FYI your fan was made sometime in the 1930's.

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 Posted: Fri Jan 1st, 2021 10:55 am
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Lane Shirey
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William Layfield wrote: Thanks for the reply. I am indeed a mechanic. I work on f15 fighter jets. Whoo lol. I have been using the search function and also bagging and tagging the hardware and taking lots of pics. I'll post my progress pics as I go. Thanks again!

You should have no problem working on a fan, lol. They’re pretty simple compared to a fighter jet.  Just one tip with that fan- if you plan to remove the stator to replace the headwire, don’t use the PVC pipe method that you might read about.  That’s only for cast iron motors.  It will distort a stamped steel housing and then the bearings will not align.  

Instead straddle the motor housing over an open vise and use a drift punch through the screw holes in the motor housing to tap on the stator laminate core.  Alternate holes on each side to walk the stator out of the housing. It won’t move much with each hit, but be persistent.  Use a solid hit on one side, then use the hole on the opposite side , etc.  be sure to push in the headwire as the stator starts to move, so you don’t tear coil wires .  

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 Posted: Mon Jan 4th, 2021 01:23 pm
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Malcolm MacGregor
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Joined: Sun May 24th, 2020
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William,  that’s a nice fan. As other members have commented, navigating the forum can take time, but it gets easier after a few visits. And welcome. I’m sending you a PM (private message)

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