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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 09:59 pm
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Adam Rohn
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Does anyone have any tips about getting the smoothest paint finish possible when using a can of spray paint? When ever I spray paint my fans I seem to always get micro scratches or blemishes. I'm gonna use dupil-color on my next fan

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:08 pm
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Ralph Bliss
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Rust-oleum Appliance Epoxy is about as close to the original finish that you can get from a rattle can. You'll want to coat kind of thick, without letting the paint run.

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Last edited on Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:11 pm by Ralph Bliss

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:16 pm
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Adam Rohn
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I was actually gonna use duplicolor color changing paint for a custom look on my GE AOU. And thats my problem, I usually put it on too thick and it runs then I end up sanding the run off after it dries. Do you think the disposeable paint nozzles that go on spray cans that eastwood sells would help with better control?

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:24 pm
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Ralph Bliss
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Avoid runs. Clean the nozzle after each use by turning the can upside down and spraying until it sprays just clear.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:30 pm
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Adam Rohn
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So thats why I'm getting runs?

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:35 pm
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Richard Larson
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That will help - but not between each pass but each time you use the can. Also multiple thin coats is much better than one or two thick coats. The can will say how long to wait between coats.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 10:58 pm
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Adam Rohn
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Thanks Richard. Will throwing the bare metal on my buffer before painting aid in getting me a smooth blemish free finish? I think I read somewhere once that it would.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 10th, 2009 11:57 pm
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Nicholas Denney
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Removing ALL grease and dirt is key too... dust and heavy fingerprints can ruin a paintjob. (Don't just wipe, use a cleaner.)

Also make sure that the can is thoroughly shaken before use and is completely at or slightly above room temperature. The paint shouldn't turn the can cold when shaken.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 12:14 am
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Adam Rohn
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Thanks Nick, I usually just wipe or use water on a rag..That may be my downfall

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 12:36 am
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Kim Frank
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The secret to getting a blemish free finish is the prep work. It's not unusual to have ten or more hours in getting the cast iron ready for a finish.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 12:45 am
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Adam Rohn
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Whats the best way to prep cast iron, Kim?

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 12:53 am
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Richard Larson
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Lot of little steps. I'm not near the pro that some of the others are but my steps are this for ones I'm going to rattle can myself.

1 Strip all paint. Every little tiny bit out of all nooks and crannies. Might take sandblasting, chemical, sanding, etc.

2 Depending on how rough the casting is from the factory, filing, grinding, and sanding down any rough or high spots to get them level and smooth.

3 Clean the entire thing with a solvent.

4 Now body filler in pits and other inward defects.

5 Sand it all smooth and do additional filler as needed.

6 Sand it all smooth again.

7 Clean it off with a sovent suitable for paint prep.

8 First primer coat of paint, then a very light very fine grit sanding. Wipe down then additional coat of primer and very light sand again.

9 Wipe down and start on multiple coats of the final paint.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 01:02 am
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Adam Rohn
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Thanks Richard, I'm gonna follow your steps when I paint my GE. :D

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 01:12 am
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Adam Rohn
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Richard,

Can you reuse body filler or is it a one shot deal? I hate to buy too much and waste it

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 05:23 am
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Nick Rodnicki Jr
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I use Acetone (solvent) to clean cast iron and steel before painting.

Also, with that  appliance epoxy paint....if you go thick & heavy it will never dry out unless you bake it in an oven.  The appliance epoxy will give you a very original looking paint job.  So, as others have already said, thin coats.

Duplicolor is a lacquer so lots of thin coats.


Nick

Last edited on Wed Nov 11th, 2009 05:29 am by Nick Rodnicki Jr

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 08:16 am
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Mark Hogan
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Nick Rodnicki Jr wrote: I use Acetone (solvent) to clean cast iron and steel before painting.

Also, with that  appliance epoxy paint....if you go thick & heavy it will never dry out unless you bake it in an oven.  The appliance epoxy will give you a very original looking paint job.  So, as others have already said, thin coats.

Duplicolor is a lacquer so lots of thin coats.


Nick


Same here, it dries almost instantly and will remove any oil deposits left behind.

As mentioned, preparation is the key to a smooth finish. Sand, sand and sand some more Rattle Can paint will go on in very thin coats and will show every last imperfection there is. Multiple coats is not uncommon. Practice will ultimately be your best tool.

 I use a product called POLANE B It's a 2 part epoxy paint that dries Rock Hard and in about 2 hours to the touch. It can be applied thin or thick, depending on how you mix it. A rather forgiving paint. Only draw back is, once it's mixed. It has about a 12 hour shelf life before it becomes too thick to spray as it  hardens in the spray bottle.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 10:57 am
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Richard Larson
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On the body filler - you can get a type called Glazing Putty which is ready to use and comes in small tubes which you can just use as you need in small amounts. Most auto stores like Western Auto, AutoZone, PepBoys, etc should have it.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 12:01 pm
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Ron Powell
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Adam, Your micro scratches are from your sand job, you must sand with a finer grit such as 400 on your final to get the scratches out. Some even go as far as 600-800. Then apply a thin coat of primer following with 3 more heavier coats. Sand it with 600-800 making sure you leave no scratches. Then spray your base coat (color) using the same steps wiping it down with a tack rag first or a good lint free cloth. Everything MUST be free from dirt, oil, moisture or any contaminates or you'll get fish eye's or orange peeling in your paint. Make sure your hands are clean and haven't touch anything oily. Temp and humidity also play a part in ruining a well prepared paint job. Never try to paint when humidity is higher then 60 percent and temp is below 70 or above 90. Lacquer thinner is fine for wiping down bare metal surfaces before painting and if your rag comes up dirty after a wipe down you know you haven't cleaned well enough. Dish soap and water work well to clean the surface but, make sure it's dried well before continuing to paint.
These are just some guide lines and do not include everything that should done before, during and after painting nor are they in the right order. Oh! and by the way clearing the nozzle of the paint can does not prevent runs, it only prevents the nozzle from clogging and or spitting. Proper spraying method prevents runs and, practice, practice, practice.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 11th, 2009 11:00 pm
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Steve Sherwood
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This is what I know about painting fans, it takes practice and more practice if you do not have painting experience.

Steve Sherwood
 

Last edited on Thu Nov 12th, 2009 11:56 am by Steve Sherwood

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 Posted: Thu Nov 12th, 2009 02:09 am
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Chris Etzkorn
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wet sand 1200 then use #1 by hand then #2 with soft wheel at low rpm then #9

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