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Levolier Switch Revival  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:21 am
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Russ Huber
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When you disconnect your wires from the switch mark their locations. This McGill levolier is popular in many circulators. This one is out of a 36 Airmaster. Dirty and the switch nipple is sloppy. :up:

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Last edited on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:22 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:26 am
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Russ Huber
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I use non-pumice generic hand cleaner. I put a dab in my dollar store plastic kitty litter box and scrub it good working the cleaner into the switch. I then work the switch to help clean the contacts. Let is sit a bit and the cleaner will do its work in the switch internally. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:28 am
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Russ Huber
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I then use compressed air to blow the hand cleaner out of the switch thoroughly and rag her down. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:34 am
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Russ Huber
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I then squirt in electrical switch grease in key areas. This grease will not hurt plastic components and will not oxidize. I then use the compressed air nozzle to work it deep into the switch where it counts. I operate the switch during the process. I then blow off and out the excess grease and wipe the switch down. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:39 am
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Russ Huber
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I now need to remove the switch nipple to remove the remains of the old chain and add new. I first pull the switch nipple out as far as it will go, I then work a hooked probe(based on the levolier design)under the switch pull spring to hold it firmly in the fully extended position. BE CAREFUL WHEN INSERTING THE PROBE NOT TO DAMAGE CONTACTS OR THE MECHANISM. :up:

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Last edited on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 05:03 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:48 am
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Russ Huber
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With the switch fully extended I can now remove the nipple by backing out the tiny set screw with a special tiny screw driver. :D Once the nipple is pulled free it exposes the DELICATE brass clip that holds the bead chain aaannnd holds the nipple to the pull on the switch. The one on the Airmaster example has been mangled...thus a sloppy switch nipple. I will replace it from another Mcgill disfunctional switch I have kept for parts. Notice the arrows pointing to the remains of the bad chain retainer and the replacement. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:55 am
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Russ Huber
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I now hook the dandy donor bead chain holder on to the switch pull and push and lock in 3 beads in the clip. It is now ready to slide the switch nipple back on with the switch nipple set screw OVER THE HOLE ON THE CLIP. The set screw will be screwed in BETWEEN TWO beads to hold the chain and nipple in place on the switch. That set screw is smaller than a knats a--, don't drop it on the floor or its history. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 04:58 am
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Russ Huber
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After doing all in the above post you are now ready to remove the hooked probe. MAKE SURE THAT SWITCH NIPPLE SET SCREW IS IN AND SNUG. DO "NOT" OVERTIGHTEN IT! :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 05:01 am
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Russ Huber
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No more droppy nipple,snug as a bug,slick action, and ready to rock 'n roll. Huuuuurahhh....Semper FI....carry on. :up:

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 11:11 am
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Randy Halbert
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Absolutely amazing!  Great training seminar.  Thanks for the detailed info.

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 Posted: Wed Apr 28th, 2010 12:13 pm
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Ron Powell
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Russ, This is the stuff we need in our semi-monthly mag, gitter in there! :thumbup

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 08:14 pm
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Scott Wisson
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so, I have a Levolier No. 450 out of my Emerson Rollabout that seems like its not working.
I pulled it a part as mentioned in one of Russ' other threads and I'm a bit confused as how the pull-chain mechanism works.  It appears the star shaped wheels inside will rotate, opening and closing certain circuits.  
What I can't seem to figure out is how the pull-chain actually gets these to turn.  I will say there were three identically shaped metal pieces (circled in the attached image) that seemed to be floating around inside the switch that I'd guess have something to do with how the pull-chain makes the star shaped wheels click to different positions, but I just can't quite grasp how they would.
I could be completely misunderstanding how this switch's internal workings actually function, so feel free to set me straight.
Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
Scott

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 10:31 pm
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Tom Dreesen
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I'm afraid Scott that those pieces are what remains of the gear that actually caused the switch to rotate through their positions.


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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 10:38 pm
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Andrew Block
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That appears to be a single layer 3 speed. Easy to replace with a turn switch.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 11th, 2014 11:50 pm
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Harmon Larimore
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Andrew Block wrote: That appears to be a single layer 3 speed. Easy to replace with a turn switch.
It's always easy if you know how.  :D


I don't mean that in the snarky way it probably sounds to one's internal dialog.  It's just that there have been a few switch replacement threads with several baffled fan owners attempting to fix switches.

There are  several areas of fan repair which might as well be alchemy to most people - quality painting, machining, cage fabrication, welding, brazing, electrical and motor/ theory..etc.

I soooo need to take few classes:

Electronics
some sort of motor repair class (if there is such a thing)
Basic Welding

There is so much to learn and the braincells are firing any faster as the days pass.

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 04:21 am
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Russ Huber
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Scott Wisson wrote: so, I have a Levolier No. 450 out of my Emerson Rollabout that seems like its not working.
I pulled it a part as mentioned in one of Russ' other threads and I'm a bit confused as how the pull-chain mechanism works.  It appears the star shaped wheels inside will rotate, opening and closing certain circuits.  
What I can't seem to figure out is how the pull-chain actually gets these to turn.  I will say there were three identically shaped metal pieces (circled in the attached image) that seemed to be floating around inside the switch that I'd guess have something to do with how the pull-chain makes the star shaped wheels click to different positions, but I just can't quite grasp how they would.
I could be completely misunderstanding how this switch's internal workings actually function, so feel free to set me straight.
Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
Scott


Are you one of the Smith brothers? Bummer you dissected that rascal like that before working it running WD-40 through it.  D amn thing looks like a rubics cube now.  Choosing a replacement switch is more than just at 3 position switch off of a Eskimo.  How much juice does that roll about suck(amps). 

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 04:40 am
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Scott Wisson
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Russ Huber wrote: Scott Wisson wrote: so, I have a Levolier No. 450 out of my Emerson Rollabout that seems like its not working.
I pulled it a part as mentioned in one of Russ' other threads and I'm a bit confused as how the pull-chain mechanism works.  It appears the star shaped wheels inside will rotate, opening and closing certain circuits.  
What I can't seem to figure out is how the pull-chain actually gets these to turn.  I will say there were three identically shaped metal pieces (circled in the attached image) that seemed to be floating around inside the switch that I'd guess have something to do with how the pull-chain makes the star shaped wheels click to different positions, but I just can't quite grasp how they would.
I could be completely misunderstanding how this switch's internal workings actually function, so feel free to set me straight.
Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
Scott


Are you one of the Smith brothers? Bummer you dissected that rascal like that before working it running WD-40 through it.  D amn thing looks like a rubics cube now.  Choosing a replacement switch is more than just at 3 position switch off of a Eskimo.  How much juice does that roll about suck(amps). 

the motor badge says 60 cycles and 1.6 amps.
So, that switch was easily and gently pulled a part.  It would appear that it could all go back together (I have actually put it back together, minus the 3 little pieces which I guess make it turn).

I can't be sure I didn't break those 3 little pieces whilst disassembling, but I was very careful knowing these are indeed rare and and possibly fragile.

I was hoping it was already broken and that I didn't do it.  It was certainly already stuck and the previous owner put an in-line switch on the cord.  I blame them. ;-)
So, there is no hope in resurrecting this switch?
Thanks guys for all the responses thus far.
Also, not a Smith, more of a Schwarzenegger crossed the with the Dos XX guy. The most interesting terminator in the world...  

Last edited on Sat Jul 12th, 2014 04:43 am by Scott Wisson

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 05:33 am
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Russ Huber
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http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/28232.html

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 04:24 pm
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Scott Wisson
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Yeah, I saw this thread.  I was very careful to bend the tabs back.

Are you suggesting I reach out to John Hilliard to see if he has parts?

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 Posted: Sat Jul 12th, 2014 04:44 pm
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Andrew Block
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I would seek out another 3 speed one. If my eyes do not deceive me, that's just a standard 3 speed which is much easier to find then the multiple layer switches.

The only difference is the pull has no exit for the chain. Type 400 should be the same.

Or use this:
http://www.coxhardware.com/p-14683-rotary-fan-switch-3-position.aspx

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 12:15 am
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Scott Wisson
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Andrew Block wrote: I would seek out another 3 speed one. If my eyes do not deceive me, that's just a standard 3 speed which is much easier to find then the multiple layer switches.

The only difference is the pull has no exit for the chain. Type 400 should be the same.

Or use this:
http://www.coxhardware.com/p-14683-rotary-fan-switch-3-position.aspx
 I believe the fan is a 2 speed (Emerson Roll About 89648) but perhaps it's a 3 speed switch that only uses the switching for 2 speeds?
I guess I'm a little baffled at the wiring as it's not what I've encountered in other Emersons I've worked on.

I referenced some of Russ' diagrams but I'm either not reading them properly or they don't apply to this fan.
I have a 2P2T On-Off-On toggle switch, but perhaps I need a different one for this set up.

It has four wires going into the motor.  I'm used to only seeing 3.
This is getting a little off topic for this thread, so I'll probably post more to this one.

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 Posted: Sun Jul 13th, 2014 05:34 am
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Jim Kovar
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Russ Huber wrote: Are you one of the Smith brothers?


Russ, after an extensive interweb Googly-
eyed search, I found out there is a third
Smith brother, coincidentally named Scott.

The third son,...      after Trade and Mark.

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Last edited on Sun Jul 13th, 2014 06:00 am by Jim Kovar

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 Posted: Wed Jul 16th, 2014 03:32 am
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Bill Hoehn
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Thanks Russ,
Very helpful information, and much appreciated!
Bill

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 Posted: Wed Jul 16th, 2014 03:51 am
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Thanks Russ,
Very helpful information, and much appreciated!
Bill

Absolutely no problem, Bill.  Rudolf Popp was McGill's pull switch wonder boy.
 
https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts&gws_rd=ssl#q=Rudolf+Popp+McGill+switch&start=0&tbm=pts 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 16th, 2014 03:51 am
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Russ Huber
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.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 16th, 2014 03:51 am
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Russ Huber
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.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 16th, 2014 04:08 am
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Russ Huber
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Early Fresh'nd-aire under Robert Devore purchased product to build their circulators in and near the windy city. 
 
Aluminum props, base plates, threaded steel pole, and plated die cast bullets forged and in Chicago.
 
Levolier switches from McGill of Valparaiso, Indiana. 
 
Nichrome radio rheostats from Central Radio Laboratories of Milwaukee, WI............Centralab. 
 
Rotary switches from Cutler-Hammer of Milwaukee. 
 
Ballentine motors from Solar industries of Chicago. 

Last edited on Wed Jul 16th, 2014 05:34 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jan 16th, 2020 02:27 am
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Richard Daugird
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A blast from the past.I love the snap those old Levolier switches make.

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 Posted: Sat Jan 18th, 2020 02:57 am
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David Hoatson
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I have worked on several Levoliers that had bad connections between the contacts and the connecting bars. I gave up trying to get continuity. I think there were two different metals involved. Maybe brass and steel. 
Always check a switch. Each contact should be less than 1 ohm. 

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