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Luke Skelnik
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My favorite era  is from the mid 20's to early 40's. But some 50's fans.... AKA Emerson.

Steve Stephens
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1887 to 1915 and, if I have to narrow that down some, it would be 1887 to 1905 but then I might be missing some nice fans made just a little bit later. Cast iron is the magic ingredient in a fan. Heavy, hard, and nice and fragile if dropped. Slathered with black japan and, maybe, some nice factory pin stripes.

John Hilliard
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Luke,

   My favorite era is as early as possible, the late 1890's to early 1900's.  I find the older the fan, the more interesting it is to me.  The older it is, the more history and intrigue it has.

   My favorites so far are my Emerson Tripod, type 1010, and type 11644. 

   I also like the oscillator design on my R&M 3804.  You screw a thumbscrew in or out to adjust the sweep.  

   Early Emerson is my main interest.

John :up::up:

Lewis Fitzgerald-Holland
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i have a deep respect for early cast iron and brass fans and like a lot of them, but i would have to say i really like the deco design and the smoothness of many of the 30's-40's fans, some of their designs are quite stunning.

René Rondeau
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1880s/1890s. After that they start to become less eccentric and more standard. I love early and odd technology.

Tom Dreesen
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The earlier the better.  What do I have?  desk fans are 20s. CFs go back to 1900s.

Here's one I would like to find in the wild (pictured in 1890 Electrical World and pat in 1889):

Attached Image (viewed 1395 times):

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Michael Rathberger
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The design period in the late 20's - 30's. Cool stuff, pushing the envelope, changing the game a bit.

I really like the early stuff as well, but more from a technical point of view, the egineering if you will. I collect it all, but have a fasination for the design period.

Russ Huber
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René Rondeau wrote:
I love early and odd technology.


You like early and odd....try Hyer-Sheehan. :D

http://books.google.com/books?id=yItMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA227&dq=Hyer-Sheehan+fan+motor&hl=en&ei=Z004TffzCMG78gbur8D5Cg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Hyer-Sheehan%20fan%20motor&f=false

Terry Fisher
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Tom.............

That sure is a modern looking fan for that year of mfg.
Thanks for the picture.

Rob Duffy
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This is tough to choose. I like many eras, but if I were to have to pick them out, I would have to say the 1890's to the 1910's, as well as 1940 to the early 60's. I appreciate the construction and features of many vintage/antique appliances. The Tesla is a very fine example of true craftsmanship. 112 years old and still cranking away like new! As for the 50's, Vornado made some revolutionary air circulators, which were big for that time and still are today! They may not contain tough cast iron and gorgeous brass, but they were also made to be mass produced and many have stood the test of time in my opinion. You have to remember that many of these fans, especially the vintage ones from the 50's have gone for decades without service! There are people out there who still use their fan that they bought brand new in 1956. No new appliance could last that long. As for me, I appreciate all the eras. I just prefer the really old stuff. :P

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Mainly because thats the main type I have that is older than the 1940s but. I really like the early 1920s fans with the S wire cages. pretty much anything that is mainly cast iron and brass. I don't have any brass cage fans but I'm sure I will get one some day.

I want to get me a nice BMY or a 16" cake sometime down the road.

edited to add that I like pretty much anything that is heavily built and ornate.

Last edited on Thu Jan 20th, 2011 05:40 pm by

William Drabble
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The key ingredients for me are cast iron and brass. You can't beat that combination.
I dont have much interest in anything after about 1910 but I do have exception like my three Veritys.
The earlier fans for me hold much more interest because I think of how the world was back then and how people must have mused about these new electrical wonders. Just think are Pancakes would have been deliverd on a hourse and cart!!!

Last edited on Thu Jan 20th, 2011 07:54 pm by William Drabble

Alan Willms
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Pre 1900

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Tom Dreesen
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"That sure is a modern looking fan for that year of mfg."

Yep, Terry, that's why it appeals to me (besides the fact it is made of unobtanium).

The Globe Fan Co, of 368 Broadway, NY, NY

It is a battery fan!  And PERFECT  (they tell you so)

Attached Image (viewed 1333 times):

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Last edited on Thu Jan 20th, 2011 09:23 pm by Tom Dreesen

Russ Huber
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The globe fan.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kLnmAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA489&lpg=PA489&dq=The+globe+fan+co.+1889&source=bl&ots=HsU_UU299f&sig=hkL7P5WekxOmpD7pGazqbpx4HTQ&hl=en&ei=YLY4TZesBIL48AbPmvjbCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCUQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=The%20globe%20fan%20co.%201889&f=false

Tom Dreesen
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OK Russ, find that patent.

August 8, 1889 patent date in the ad.  I tried a quick advanced search for "fan", the address, and "Globe" and the 2 months on either side of August 1889 with no success.

Last edited on Thu Jan 20th, 2011 09:43 pm by Tom Dreesen

Russ Huber
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The Aug. 8th date is a misprint and is what made your trail dry. The actual date was Aug. 6th of 89.

http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=EFoEAAAAEBAJ&dq=D19259

http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=uE9fAAAAEBAJ&dq=408555

Tom Dreesen
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Well those patents are the final bits to bring me to conclude that the Globe Fan Co. did not make a motor.  On page 467 there is a blurb about a display of Globe fans in their Broadway address being driven by Crocker-Wheeler motors.

It seems to be easier to make a "perfect fan" if you don't have to power it.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kLnmAAAAMAAJ&pg=PR19&dq=April+4th+1890+Electrical+World&hl=en&ei=nc04TfavDMLKgQf859DfCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CD4Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%22globe%20fan%22&f=false

Last edited on Thu Jan 20th, 2011 11:15 pm by Tom Dreesen

Jon Brown
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luke
i love the art deco fans of the 1940s thru the 1960s
emerson
westinghouse
r and m
ge
and so on
the best are the emerson 77 and 79 series
but i like the others too:D
jon

Luke Skelnik
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Me too Jon:tumbs

Last edited on Fri Jan 21st, 2011 01:19 am by Luke Skelnik

David Hunter
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William Drabble wrote:
The key ingredients for me are cast iron and brass. You can't beat that combination.
I dont have much interest in anything after about 1910 but I do have exception like my three Veritys.
The earlier fans for me hold much more interest because I think of how the world was back then and how people must have mused about these new electrical wonders. Just think are Pancakes would have been deliverd on a hourse and cart!!!


William, hmmm, nice thoughts about the Veritys. Would you please post pics of them here? Thanks. Other than this you can't go wrong if you just concentrate on fans made before 1900. The more the original condition, the better.

Last edited on Fri Jan 21st, 2011 04:22 am by David Hunter

Ryan Lemke
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Late 30's through 50's. If I had to pick one year, I'd say 1940. Deco is great!

David Hunter
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How about just starting with two:



1900 Dayton - 1896 Emerson Meston

...then, the two that got away:



1909 R&M DC Lollipop - 1906 Emerson 1115

Finally, two of my beloved Veritys:



1909 Veritys Aston - 1913 (?) Veritys Orbit

Last edited on Sat Jan 22nd, 2011 04:16 am by David Hunter

Fred Berry
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Threads like these are always fun to read!

I like fans from the 2000's down to the 1800's...

I like plastic fans as much as cast iron & brass.

Photo: two dust collectors in bedroom...

Edit: Dave, the cage on that 1900 Dayton makes me dizzy looking at it!!

Attached Image (viewed 1142 times):

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Last edited on Sat Jan 22nd, 2011 04:18 pm by Fred Berry

Fred Berry
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William, hmmm, nice thoughts about the Veritys. Would you please post pics of them here?
I kinda like the Verity's fan too. Their odd oscillation is fun to
watch.
These are one of the few "ball-motor" fans that I like...

Attached Image (viewed 1179 times):

2011-01-22 12.27.51.jpg

Ray Vacca
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I can't help that I am new to the Fan thing, these fans are gorgeous....if I ran across a pre 1900 fan I would be on cloud nine. Where have they been found? Whats the story behind the thrill of the hunt?Ray

Jim Kovar
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Russ Huber wrote: You like early and odd....try Hyer-Sheehan. :D

I saw one of those fans on

eBay a while back.   :D



Seller didn't have a clue...







Was listed in the "Ty Beanie

Baby" category.   :shock:





:pissed  Some boy scout alerted the

seller and it was quickly yanked.

Steve Stephens
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Ray Vacca wrote: I can't help that I am new to the Fan thing, these fans are gorgeous....if I ran across a pre 1900 fan I would be on cloud nine. Where have they been found? Whats the story behind the thrill of the hunt?Ray
The old fans are hard to find but they are still out there.  Fan club conventions, other collectors, word of mouth, ebay, etc.  Get the word out and search and follow up on leads.   My last pre-1900 fan was an 1899 Emerson on ebay that I had asked a few questions about and the seller happened to tell me that he was considering pulling it from ebay and selling at a big antiques sale a few months later.  When the fan was not on ebay the next day I contacted him and ended up driving to his home, about 100 miles away, and buying the fan.  It didn't come cheap but I got the fan.  It's best to learn about the early fans so, if one shows up, you know enough to try to buy it.

Another one on ebay in incomplete condition but it looked very original and I was interested.   I knew another collector who would probably end up with the fan and he did.   Before the auction was over we made an agreement that if he won the fan he would make a blade and get it completed and running and sell to me.   Perhaps my favorite fan and the oldest, an 1890 C&C.



This is a photo from the ebay auction how it looked when I saw it.


All done except for the new, reproduced blade.  The motor needed work to run, some screws were missing or incorrect, motor need brushes, parts to the original light socket and a period correct c.1891 light bulb plus the blade.   I was fortunate to know the person who could do this.   There are amazing craftsmen in the AFCA who can turn a fan stump or very rough fan into a beautiful example.




Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 10:07 pm by Steve Stephens

Ray Vacca
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Steve, thank you for relaying that story. I can't wait for outdoor flea market season,  thats where I have stumbled across several of my finds. My big brass bladed Emerson was a mess when I got it for a song at a local auction house.  I plan on attending the show in Indianapolis this summer and hope to meet many of the names I see on the forum. I enjoy picking the brains and hearing tales of those much smarter and knowledgeable than myself. Ray

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 11:57 pm by Ray Vacca

Aaron Hardy
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I'm partial to the 1930s-1940s. For me the era represents resilience of the American spirit. It is also the coming of age period for my grandparents' generation. I love studying the history, especially concerning WWII and the build up to Korea. May have a lot to do with my Marine Corps background!

Last edited on Fri Mar 15th, 2019 03:18 am by Aaron Hardy

Steven P Dempsey
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1894 - 1950

Steve Cunningham
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1885-1915 The Golden Era.

Pete Moulds
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I absolutely agree in cast iron and brass, definitely.
Old, preferably, but the thing that really fascinates me is the technical innovation especially the many different ways they attempted to make them oscillate. This would perhaps be 1910 to 1930?
In particular, when the mechanism of the oscillation mechanism is exposed in full finger-mashing view like a French Martinot or waving about in a bizarre way to catch your eye across a room.

For this reason I dream of owning a lollipop oscillator and a vane oscillator but they are like hen's teeth outside the US.
As I no longer live in the USA, leaving long before starting collecting; so I will have to restore a couple or three Veritys Orbitals and twin levers to trade and negotiate with on my next trip to see my daughters I guess.

Maybe plan a trip with time to visit the Fan Fair or one of the regional meets within a reasonable drive from Chicago?

Gunner Lake
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I'm in the wrong forum but 20s-70s. I'll take deco, chrome, and streamlined over brass any day.

Steven P Dempsey
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I dif early brass, but also the streamlined design of the 30s

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Steven P Dempsey
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I mean - - "I Dig"

Steven P Dempsey
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I have 10 of these in various states of repair - - 10, 12 & 16 versions!!

Steven P Dempsey
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Those Arctic Aire's drom the 40s had nice lines also.

Derek Warnecke
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Portable Fans... Definitely the interesting, over-the-top turn of the century models.  Century S4 Sidegear, Westinghouse Tanks, Emerson 6-wingers, etc.
Ceiling Fans...  I'm partial to late '20s-WWII era Emersons.  Many variants and models, gobs of innovation (electrically-reversible in the early '30s, **PSC motors in 1937...) in a pleasing Art Deco style that is adaptable to many rooms.

**Side note: I'm still looking to buy one of these, either an 85641-AK or 87641-AK.

Last edited on Fri Mar 15th, 2019 03:16 pm by Derek Warnecke

Jim Humphrey
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My favorites are definitely in the 1900 - 1920 range, brass & brass, 12" and smaller, and preferably oscillators.  I love the appearance of this range of fans, their virtual indestructibility and especially their demonstration of the wacky ways designers came up with to get them to oscillate.  You can see the progression from some really agonizing mechanisms to the simple devices that seem to work good and last forever. 

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I also love the cast iron and brass era from late 1800 to 1920's

Larry Miceli
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Definitely the 1920’s to the 1930’s. This is a picture of my home office in my 1920’s bungalow.

John Trier
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I have thought about this question a lot since I've collected fans and other things.   My favorite era is whenever a fan manufacturer reaches its pinnacle when designing a fan.  Cost is not a concern.   Examples:   Paragon 1897 ish.   This model pulls out all the stops with cast brass accents, best cage ever made, etc.   Earlier Paragon is less detailed  and later Paragon's degrade with a steel cage etc.   Also:  Dayton Spin Start, Peerless Spin Start, Arched foot Dayton ...... Those fans were designed to be "in your face" cool  ....... as in, "I can make a cooler fan than you".   Companies competed to create beauty.   All companies had to introduce a fan.  Then they upgraded them to be as cool and as beautiful as possible.  Then they steadily degraded over time due to cost and mass production.  Pick any area of collecting, and this is generally what companies did with their products.  

 


Russ Huber
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.





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Mel Lagarde
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I would have to go with 1880’s to 1915 or so.   So many unique fans beautifully designed and built.   
Mel 

Joel Schmid
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LOL - I will take the 500 volt fan. I can use it as a Defrib on the wife when she finds out how much I spent on all these fans ....

Tom Morel
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Early fans. By 1920, things became boring.

Richard Daugird
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Cast iron and brass, with big pizza wedge or Parker blades. The older and more ornate the better. Crazy oscilators; I have a couple vanes and a lolipop, but I'd love a rollercoaster. Oh, and Vortalexes...

Last edited on Sun Mar 17th, 2019 08:45 pm by Richard Daugird

Steve Stephens
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Is this c.1904 German AEG ornate enough for you?   For all of its fanciness it was given only one speed but it runs very well.   The grease cups on top of the shaft is similar to old automotive grease cups where you fill the cup with grease and screw the cover down a fraction of a turn as needed.   I like the way the guard is made with wires going through piercings in the crossing wires.   The fan is unrestored, original finish.

















Last edited on Mon Mar 18th, 2019 01:24 am by Steve Stephens

Richard Daugird
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That needs to be at my house, Steve.

René Rondeau
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6,000 watts??

Jim Kovar
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René Rondeau wrote: 6,000 watts??
WOW!   :shock:


That'sa "lots-o'-Watts."   :wondering:





 :light:  Best case (unity PF),...
that'd be only 50 Amps.  :thumbup

Steve Stephens
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Jim Kovar wrote: René Rondeau wrote: 6,000 watts??
WOW!   :shock:


That'sa "lots-o'-Watts."   :wondering:





 :light:  Best case (unity PF),...
that'd be only 50 Amps.  :thumbup
Yes, and I use the fan for heating purposes too.   Heat my house and circular the hot air.   But what does that 6000 W really mean?

Richard Daugird
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German watts.

Richard Daugird
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That fan IS NOT SAFE to run in Californie, send it on down here to Tejas, I have 10,000 watts coming out of my outlets. My brother in law/cousin/parole officer re-wired my electric meter... :clap:


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