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One of my box fans  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 01:22 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Thanks to you all for input on this wiring question I had. I am going to wire it up and see if it works like it should. I will try the trim speed screw to shut off motor then turn it to just about where motor starts up and go a little further so it won't stall. If it works, then going to drill the holes for mounting switch and plate on side next to where original switch was. I have something I can put over the hole where original switch was mounted. 

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 01:26 pm
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Rob Duffy
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Use a power strip with an off switch, turn the solid state speed selector all the way to the lowest setting, back the trim pot out a bit so the fan won't start on the lowest setting, then use the button on the power strip to turn the fan on so it automatically starts on low, then set your low speed from there so you can get the lowest possible speed without worrying about the motor stalling in the future. A couple of seconds of the motor not rotating won't harm it and this is the quickest and most effective way as far as I know.

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 03:56 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Here are some photos...

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 03:58 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Vari speed is in.

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 03:59 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Starting to look good.

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 04:00 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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All wires wire secured with supplied wire nuts and used electrical tape to tape all wires together and tucked in lip of frame.

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 04:02 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Waxed the Patton blade set and cleaned grilles.

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 Posted: Sat May 31st, 2014 04:07 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Done! Wow! Holy crap that switch is cool! I tamed it down finally! High is still gale force, but I adjusted trim pot so fan runs super slow. Thank you Rob and rest of gang for all your help! This can be used actually for inside of house. Awesome suggestion, recommend it highly for fans that need tamed or just more variable settings.

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 Posted: Sun Jun 1st, 2014 08:11 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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General Patton is finished!  Thanks to all who helped me with this project. It's much tamer on low speed and I can use it more now. Tag on Mc Millen motor  rated 2.7 amps. On high it uses 2.0 amps, and on lowest setting with variac switch it uses 1.87 amps. On high it uses 230 watts!! On low it uses 115 watts. Still one powerful fan! The motor is permanently lubricated with internal oil slinger and synthetic oil. One question though......it has oil ports on front and back of motor housing above shaft. Do I still oil it with zoom spout or not? 

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 Posted: Sun Jun 1st, 2014 08:49 pm
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Patrick McGuire
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You did a fantastic job on that. Really something to be proud of. It should last for decades! If it has oil ports on it I would oil it once a season with Zoom Spout. It can't hurt it. I have a couple of McMillan motors myself. They seem to be very good motors.

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 Posted: Sun Jun 1st, 2014 08:55 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Thanks! I will oil the front and back bearing at oil ports with zoom spout. Just was curious why there are oil ports but it states on original box of Patton fan it is permanent lubricated. Fun project for sure.

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 Posted: Mon Jun 2nd, 2014 10:07 pm
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Tony Clayton
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Its only my take on the explanation.  These companies are in the business to sell you another one. So if they say it is permanently lucubrated, most people tend to think the same as you. Never oiling the permanently lubricated motor and one day it goes poof. The next day chances are most people are buying a new fan to replace the old one. It is  called keeping your business in business by not telling the "Paul Harvey" version of the story. 

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 11:13 am
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Tom Zapf
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when i was a kid, my friends had 2 fans a double 12" eskimo (they had a small house and the upper level windows were low and long under the "Eyebrow"  pf the roofline. One day i was over and they had a new Westinghouse 20" plain jane brown 1961-2-ish round corner box fan. Big white vinyl strap on top (there is one on ebay now), no venturi, black hub and motor, metal grilles, 2 speed. That fan has travelled the country. I still keep up with my friend and he told me the fan was being used in the garage and the one grille was the "gate" to his mother's vegetable garden in Oklahoma...ok i rescued it and now have it safely in NJ and the first time i ran it that "permanently lubricated" motor sounded dry as a desert!. i tokk it apart and loaded up the wicks and now it is a happy camper 50+ year old and will go for a long time i hope!

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 12:13 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Cool story about the Westinghouse. Glad you saved it. I oiled the motor front and back at ports but fan has very short spin down time. I mean short! It starts up super quick on high setting...always did, but spin down was never impressive to me. It was like that when new, back in 1997, and now that I oiled the motor at oil ports with zoom spout, it still has a poor spin down time. 

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 12:56 pm
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Rob Duffy
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Jeffrey Primaldi wrote: Cool story about the Westinghouse. Glad you saved it. I oiled the motor front and back at ports but fan has very short spin down time. I mean short! It starts up super quick on high setting...always did, but spin down was never impressive to me. It was like that when new, back in 1997, and now that I oiled the motor at oil ports with zoom spout, it still has a poor spin down time. Light weight or deep pitched blades have a tendency to reduce a fan's spin time.

In this case, it would be the light weight blades and the extremely light rotors McMillan used in their motors.

The first of the McMillan motors were the best they made. I have one in my Bradford box fan and it has excellent bearing surface. The motor is totally silent and very powerful. McMillan significantly cheapened their motors since then. They're still quality motors, but they did design them to be inexpensive and replaceable.

As long as you know it's oiled, that's enough to keep it going. Do make sure you dust the motor out regularly!

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 07:34 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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....never thought about the lightweight blades with little pitch to them. Your right about that. Not sure how much oil to put in ports, it seems it's thirsty and I added a lot to both ports. You can "hear" the bearing surface friction on the fan motor at spin down. Kind of weird but those bearings are those porous graphite kind I assume and hardly any usage to it for almost 20 years.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 08:47 pm
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Rob Duffy
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Jeffrey Primaldi wrote: ....never thought about the lightweight blades with little pitch to them. Your right about that. Not sure how much oil to put in ports, it seems it's thirsty and I added a lot to both ports. You can "hear" the bearing surface friction on the fan motor at spin down. Kind of weird but those bearings are those porous graphite kind I assume and hardly any usage to it for almost 20 years.The bearings are indeed porous but they're bronze, not graphite. The sound you're hearing is probably the fiber washers rubbing, which isn't a big deal at all and I wouldn't worry about it. All motors have some sort of noise to them. As long as they can spin freely and have enough lubrication to provide very little wear, they'll be fine.

As for the amount of oil used, if you put more than 15 drops inside, that is enough. Use it for a couple of months and as you use it, you should continue to add three drops every three months. This will ensure that the bearings aren't overflowing with oil and the wicks don't dry up.

Do keep in mind that the bearings need to get hot and expand before oil will flow through them to the surface of the bearing, so a good run time after oiling will help.

Last edited on Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 08:49 pm by Rob Duffy

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 09:51 pm
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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Ok. Thanks Rob. I do know it hasn't been used much since I bought the Patton air circulater back in 1997, plus with me assuming you never having to oil it, it was not as freed up as it should be. It's getting much better noise wise and spin down is little better. I will run it on a mid speed setting one day, the whole day to get it broke it better. Thanks for your input. I actually added too much oil to front bearing port but cleaned it all up and font see any oil dripping out of bottom housing of motor now. Zoom spout is recommended correct?

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 11:36 pm
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Rob Duffy
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Jeffrey Primaldi wrote: Ok. Thanks Rob. I do know it hasn't been used much since I bought the Patton air circulater back in 1997, plus with me assuming you never having to oil it, it was not as freed up as it should be. It's getting much better noise wise and spin down is little better. I will run it on a mid speed setting one day, the whole day to get it broke it better. Thanks for your input. I actually added too much oil to front bearing port but cleaned it all up and font see any oil dripping out of bottom housing of motor now. Zoom spout is recommended correct?Zoom Spout will do the job. It's all personal preference. I like to use heavier oil in fans that see a lot of use. Zoom Spout is 10 weight and 3-IN-ONE is 20 weight. People prefer Zoom Spout over 3-IN-ONE because of the smell but it doesn't bother me.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 3rd, 2014 11:41 pm
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Tony Clayton
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Jeffrey the problem I have with many fans I own is getting the oil into the little hole, vent or tube..... whatever little void there is to place oil into. When I try to put oil in, I seem to get more oil on them rather than in them. Air bubbles in the tube or just the dang hole is so small I get it everywhere never knowing how much actually got to were it is needed. I now use two different methods of getting the oil where it is needed vs oil all over the place but in the little hole. A syringe or a clock makers oilier. This gives me the ability to know how much I put into the oil reservoir and know that it all went into it rather than all over it.

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 Posted: Wed Jun 4th, 2014 12:20 am
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Jeffrey Primaldi
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That's a nifty little oil container! I don't mind 3- in - 1 oil smell either, but always thought zoom spout was better.

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 Posted: Wed Jun 4th, 2014 12:23 am
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Rob Duffy
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Jeffrey Primaldi wrote: That's a nifty little oil container! I don't mind 3- in - 1 oil smell either, but always thought zoom spout was better.It's not better or worse, it's just a lighter thinner oil. Some motors require a heavier oil. Generally the larger the motor, the heavier the oil should be.

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