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 Posted: Sat May 24th, 2014 08:28 pm
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David Hoatson
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I just picked up a Singer desk fan. Model 2901. It's AC only, with brushes, 3-speed. I saw that Singer was working with Diehl. Did Diehl make it? Just curious of the history. 

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 Posted: Sat May 24th, 2014 08:29 pm
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David Hoatson
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 Posted: Sat May 24th, 2014 11:07 pm
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Tony Clayton
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David Hoatson wrote: I just picked up a Singer desk fan. Model 2901. It's AC only, with brushes, 3-speed. I saw that Singer was working with Diehl. Did Diehl make it? Just curious of the history. 
David,
I stumbled onto this surfing Darryl Hudson's Web site a month or so ago. This is just a snippet of the Fun Fan Facts history document  that Darryl has about a 1/4 the way the page. For those of you that have never noticed it. I think you will find it very informative 
Diehl Manufacturing Many thanks again to my friend Loren Haroldson for the investigative research he did to document the following facts about Philip Diehl’s patents and company.  I truly believe that Loren missed his calling as a CIA agent.  When it comes to digging up dirt, or any facts for that matter, on anybody past or present, Loren is The Man.
 
Philip Diehl was born in Germany and trained as a locksmith.  Upon his arrival in the U.S. he took employment with Singer.  For a brief period of years, he was stationed at a factory in Chicago.   He lost everything in the Chicago fire of 1870.  He later married while in Chicago but then returned east to become chief experimenter for Singer.  He was also a pioneer in early lighting. He developed a type of light bulb that did not need lead in wires, which led Edison to have to lower his high royalties to other companies.   Around 1887 he developed a type of flat motor for Singer sewing machines.  He attached a fan blade to it and installed it in his house.  This is believed to be the first direct drive ceiling fan.  It ran for a while as he made final adjustments. 
It is believed that the first ceiling fan to run on electricity was made by Electro Dynamics in 1884, which was battery operated, and then the Hunter Brothers’ model in 1886.  But Diehl's was the first direct drive ceiling fan.  He put this on the market in 1887 and formed Diehl and Company along with three other workers at Singer.  His ceiling fan was patented in 1889 and shortly thereafter he is credited with inventing the first electrolier (lights) to attach to a ceiling fan.  He also attached this motor to a pole and marketed it as a column fan, and they also made and sold a crude desk fan.  Some credit Diehl with also inventing the first desk lamp.  The company was incorporated in 1896 and became known as Diehl Manufacturing.  Two of Philip's brothers also worked at Diehl.  The fans they made were all D.C. and many were made for export.  Some were even purchased and relabeled once they reached overseas.  In 1904 Diehl developed a type of split ball joint for their fans.  This enabled them to swing back and forth and also be adjusted forward and backward. Diehl's cousin’s son, Frederick, was perhaps almost as prolific an inventor as Philip.   In 1907 Frederick developed a type of oscillating fan that collectors call the “walking foot.   Over the next couple of years, Diehl used a type of oscillating principal that is known to collectors as a kidney oscillator and also a toilet bowl oscillator.  Both named for their general shape in back of the fan.  In 1912 Diehl got into the A.C. market by buying and using G.E. motors for their fans.  In 1914 the fan frames became die cast, and in 1915 Diehl had developed their own A.C. fan motors. Prior to this development, Singer was buying their A.C. motors from Hamilton Beach to use on their sewing machines.  In 1914 Diehl developed another type of gear oscillator in which the bulk of the gear works was inside the back of the fan motor with just a small part extending out the back.  Diehl was running out of room and their fan making tools were wearing out as well by around 1912-13.  Singer refused to allow Diehl to expand as they foresaw the need of the space themselves in the coming years.  Diehl went ahead and purchased new fan making tools and built a new factory, which housed only the fan motor and small motor division.  They occupied this new factory in January of 1914.  However, by January 1916, Diehl had sold the tools and factory to a concern from Delaware called Woodard and Sons. The Diehl Company took a big hit when world war one  began.  They could no longer ship as many fans overseas as before.  This brings up an interesting question.  Where did Diehl get their fans between 1916 and 1918?  Did Woodard make them and sell them to Diehl? It's unlikely that Diehl could have moved their fan and small motor business back into the Singer building with the rest of the Diehl line.  After all that's why moved out part of their business in the first place; not enough room in the Singer complex. Twice in 1918 Singer gave Diehl a deadline to get the rest of their operation out of their building as Singer was ready to expand.  Finally, in June of 1918, Diehl put up a new building and moved out. Then two months later in August of 1918, Singer took over Diehl and sold off the new building to G.E. at a loss.  Diehl was now a division of Singer. It appears that Diehl was having some big problems.   Profits for 1914 were zero dollars and all the Diehl employees had their pay cut by 10% for a number of months that year.  Diehl in the 30's began offering a fan under the Commandaire label, which was sold through the Montgomery Wards catalogues. They also introduced a fan in the early 30's, which featured ribbons instead of blades. They originally were going to offer the Diehl Ribbonaire and the Singer Simanco but decided to go with the Ribbonaire for both the Diehl and Singer label. This idea was the invention of a Ljundstrom of Sweden.  He and his brother had an electrical manufacturing concern based in Sweden. They made heat exchangers for coal plants and also large turbines.  One of their major investors was the Nobel family of Sweden.   In 1930, Diehl developed a type of gyro fan.  It's not known if this fan was ever made and/or sold.  Part of the Diehl factory was moved to nearby Finderne in 1941 to handle the war-time orders.   In 43, the entire Diehl operation moved from Elizabeth to Finderne.   I'm not really up to date on the recent history of Diehl.   Sometime ago what was left of Diehl Manufacturing was purchased by a company called Airmaster.   This concern is still making large fans in Jackson Michigan.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 12:00 am
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David Hoatson
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It's funny the history was on Hudsonscustommachining.com because I got the fan in a town 20 miles from Darryl's house. The guy also has a small R&M with steel cage and solid badge (model 1304?). The AFCA gallery shows a Singer model 1901 that looks younger than my model 2901. None of the Diehls or Hamilton Beach's that I see look like the Singer. I am curious of the age of my Singer. The blades are scratched up and the felt is not original and the headwire is PVC modern wire. I'll probably paint the blade and use a piece of the original white cotton line cord for the headwire. Maybe fix up the felt. The original paint on the motor and base looks great, so I'll just do a light cleaning. This might be the first fan I sell. It's a cute fan. I'm starting to like the look of brushes, too. 

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:43 am
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Russ Huber
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If your fan has a laminated stator it will more than likely run even better on direct current.  (Universal motor)  Diehl went from drawn steel fans motors with brass trimmings starting in 13 and went to die cast housings by 15. In 18 Diehl was purchased by Singer became a subsidiary to Singer Mfg. Co. and remained so for decades.
Your fan I would think dates in the 20s.  If it had the medallion badge it would date 24+.
 

Last edited on Sun May 25th, 2014 02:56 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:52 am
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David Hoatson
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Thanks for the info. If you look closely, you can see that it is one of those very rare "crooked-mounted badge" variants, perhaps one-of-a-kind. :P

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:56 am
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Russ Huber
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The following question was asked on Darryl's history page on Diehl.

 Where did Diehl get their fans between 1916 and 1918?
Answer: Diehl Mfg. Co. made them. I hope this helps. Even Loren will tell you some changes need to be made with Darryl's Fun Fan facts.  This based on all the new recent legit book information released by Google books over the past few years.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:09 am
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:14 am
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:23 am
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David Hoatson
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Russ Huber wrote: If your fan has a laminated stator it will more than likely run even better on direct current. 
The motor tag just says 60 cycle AC. I haven't opened it up yet. Maybe there is a speed coil in the base (AC) and not a resistor (AC/DC)?

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:27 am
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Darryl Hudson
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Yes, I've got some updating to do in some areas of the site due to recent finds of published information, much of it found by Russ Huber.  Currently I don't have a computer.  All of my text files were done on a PC and are Word documents.  My computer got hit by lightening and I have not replaced it and I currently only have an IPad so updates to the page are long over due.  Hang in there.  A lot of it is still good info, but I admit there are some inconsistencies that need to be fixed.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:29 am
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Russ Huber
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David Hoatson wrote: Russ Huber wrote: If your fan has a laminated stator it will more than likely run even better on direct current. 
The motor tag just says 60 cycle AC. I haven't opened it up yet. Maybe there is a speed coil in the base (AC) and not a resistor (AC/DC)?

Your fan has brushes and an armature with commutator.  Speed coils are found in AC induction motors. A universal brush motor can be designed to run on 60 cycle AC. And DC circuit as well.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:29 am
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Russ Huber
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Diehl fan motor base pivot patent.

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Last edited on Sun May 25th, 2014 03:31 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:26 pm
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David Hoatson
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Russ, looks like you are right - there is a coated nichrome resistance in the base, so it probably will work on DC. Wonder why they didn't advertise DC on the tag?

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:29 pm
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David Hoatson
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It has a simple up/down pivot:

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:37 pm
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David Hoatson
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Sometime long ago, someone cut off the original black power cord and added a rather long white cloth cord. This shows why you should inspect an old fan - the splice was done without solder, was working, but could get hot enough to cause a fire maybe. 

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 02:45 pm
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Russ Huber
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I posted the Diehl Mfg. fan pivot patent to help give and idea of time period the fan would be in.  This Singer/Diehl model of late teens to early 20s sports the pivot patent.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:03 pm
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Russ Huber
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David Hoatson wrote: There is a coated nichrome resistance in the base, so it probably will work on DC. Wonder why they didn't advertise DC on the tag?
If the fan manufacturer wanted to market an AC fan motor and could not keep up with AC induction motor production , or produce a brushless AC induction motor, they cheated using a brushed universal motor. Just that simple.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:03 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:03 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:04 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:16 pm
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Russ Huber
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Electricity was not standardized back then. Don't visualize yourself buying a fan today.....visualize yourself buying a fan back then.  If you lived in an area providing alternating current you would want to purchase an alternating current fan motor.  If you lived in an area providing specifically direct current....you would more than likely seek a direct current fan motor.  The consumer was no electrical genius, he was just hot and wanted to get the correct fan motor for his circuit.
 
The Jobbers must of had to babble overtime explaining universal fan motors to the electrically challenged back then.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 03:52 pm
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David Hoatson
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The shaded pole AC technology must have been less expensive than armatures, commutators, brushes, centrifugal start switches, and even inductively-delayed start winding (Emerson). I think that one thing that makes the GE pancake desireable is its simplicity.  I believe all AC fans are shaded pole today.  Darwin was correct - long live evolution (sorry Nebraska school board). :P

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:35 pm
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Russ Huber
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David Hoatson wrote: I believe all AC fans are shaded pole today.  Darwin was correct - long live evolution (sorry Nebraska school board). :P  
.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:36 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:36 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:37 pm
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:37 pm
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:38 pm
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:41 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:42 pm
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:45 pm
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David Hoatson
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Russ, what is that?

I forgot that most ceiling fans and other devices have capacitor starts. Must give more reliable starts for heavy motors?

Capacitors generally seem to be unreliable. 

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 06:56 pm
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Russ Huber
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Beef up your checkbook and get a flight to Thailand! I bet they are making a new batch of the pot metal wonder fans as I type! 

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 07:06 pm
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David Hoatson
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The funny thing is the "GE" emblem flipped around. It's like when a guy gets a Chinese word tattooed upside down. 

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 07:14 pm
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Russ Huber
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David Hoatson wrote: The funny thing is the "GE" emblem flipped around. 
Wrongo Bucko.  SE = Sushi Electric.

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 Posted: Sun May 25th, 2014 09:54 pm
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David Hoatson
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Russ Huber wrote: David Hoatson wrote: The funny thing is the "GE" emblem flipped around. 
Wrongo Bucko.  SE = Sushi Electric.
Electric eel sushi? Can I charge that? 

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 Posted: Mon May 26th, 2014 02:26 pm
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David Hoatson
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I've got the little fan cleaned up. I'm not going to paint anything. Just set the wiring up safe. 

One detail that amused me - the motor head wire grommet is knurled on the outside like most thread-in grommets, but this one also has two grooves in the inside that go halfway down. This lets you install the grommet with a medium sized flat screwdriver. 

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 Posted: Mon May 26th, 2014 06:41 pm
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David Hoatson
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I cleaned it up a little bit:

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 Posted: Mon May 26th, 2014 06:44 pm
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David Hoatson
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And added a new head wire (actually the old power cord dyed black). The cord insulation fibers were a bit hard and shiny. I tried to burn the scraps, hoping they were nitro cellulose, but they didn't explode. Looks like it's rayon. 
About 20 years ago, a mil-spec wire salesman asked me if I used a particular type of aircraft wire. He said they figured out that the plastic insulation, which was very thin and light, was also an explosive. Wire harnesses could explode if hit hard enough.  :P   Early ping pong balls were nitro cellulose. 

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 Posted: Wed May 28th, 2014 01:28 am
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David Hoatson
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She's all back together, the Singer, with black suede on the base (green felt belongs on pool tables, not fans). It vibrated some, so I gently bent a couple blades fore/aft and twisted one, until all of the leading edges and trailing edges were the same distance from a reference cage part. This made it very smooth. Three speeds. Low is pretty quiet, high sounds like an airplane. 

YouTube video: http://youtu.be/7eFiAfgL_JQ

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