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Emerson 4564139 Restoration  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Tue Jun 23rd, 2015 12:07 am
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David Hoatson
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 Posted: Tue Jun 23rd, 2015 12:07 am
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David Hoatson
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 Posted: Tue Jun 23rd, 2015 12:16 am
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David Hoatson
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I have a new switch that fits, but I think I'm going to use the original switch, with a black copper oxide finish on its cover. I'll have to restore the "1", "2", "3", "OFF" somehow. 

I have some high grade sticker material that I can laser print. Any other ideas? 

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 Posted: Tue Jun 23rd, 2015 07:25 am
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Cory Baughn
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Printable water slide decals David. They work great, just buy the clear version of the paper and print on the numbers. Next you coat them with a sealer so the ink doesn't run, and after the coating dries you're ready to cut them out and apply. Do cut them out with very little edge around the numbers. Apply them using regular waterslide decal procedures.


I have had great results with waterslide decals, and once they are adhered you can put a coat of clear over them for protection. They are much thinner than any vinyl decal material and look as if they were printed on the item, or painted on. Very professional results.


BTW David, I misstated earlier about copper oxide finishes. I was looking to find out about copper verdigris finishes instead, but am glad that you put those links up because copper oxide is a finish that I am interested in learning as well.

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 Posted: Tue Jun 23rd, 2015 10:43 am
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David Hoatson
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Thanks, Cory. I'll look into the decals. 

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 Posted: Fri Jul 10th, 2015 01:38 pm
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David Hoatson
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Shiny copper!  At B&E Electroform, Simpsonville, SC. 

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 Posted: Sat Jul 11th, 2015 10:13 pm
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Mitch W. Romero
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David Hoatson wrote: I cleaned the stator with acetone and Q-tips, repaired some tape wraps, and sprayed electrical lacquer. The original coil wrap tape was a plastic tape and it was brittle and had pieces falling off on the top side, so I wrapped the exposed sections with friction tape. 

Now, I'm cleaning and media blasting the iron parts. It has a nice smooth casting and should look nice with a polished oxide finish. Nothing mechanically wrong.
David did you put acetone on the wires if so that's not good

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 Posted: Sat Jul 11th, 2015 10:45 pm
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David Hoatson
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I only use acetone on cast iron or steel parts. I'm afraid of putting any solvent on these old coils. I used the acetone to get the dirt off the stator laminations and did not touch the coils.

I had a Westy ceiling fan were the insulation was falling off the coil wires. I took it to a motor guy who cleaned it and dipped it in some kind of vacuum lacquer tank. If a coil looks good, I leave it alone. And, I only change the cloth covered wire if the insulation is falling off. If the original wire is good, I leave it in place. 


For this longnose, some of the tape on top of the coils was flaking off, but the coil wires looked good. So, I re-taped a couple places. I got the clear electrical lacquer and sprayed it good. 

Last edited on Sat Jul 11th, 2015 10:49 pm by David Hoatson

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 Posted: Sat Jul 25th, 2015 02:32 am
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David Hoatson
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I found a 1928 add. Getting the fan prewired for lights cost an extra $2. 

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 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2018 07:37 pm
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David Hoatson
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After moving from SC to MD, setting up a store, helping my son renovate an 1840's house, and finally retiring from 9-5 life, I am back on this copper oxide Longnose Emerson. I polished the copper, cleaned it well to eliminate any oil or wax, then dipped it in liver of sulphur solution to oxidize it (CuO), followed by a cold water rinse and a dry. I then did a gentle polish on the black and an agressive polish on the high spots to cut through the oxide and reveal the copper plated cast iron. 
Here is the speed coil cover and oil cup:



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 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2018 11:06 pm
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Lucas Beshara
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That is definitely the right way to do that!  I've been pondering how to do the same for my long nose. 
Can you explain more on the oxidizing solution?  What to get and how many parts of each?


Thanks!

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 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2018 11:29 pm
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Steve Cunningham
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Those fans are workhorses. People are amazed when they see how much air they move.

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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 12:06 am
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David Hoatson
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The process is a bit tricky. Get some copper pipe, cut it into test pieces, and experiment before finishing anything valuable.
1) copper plate the part if it is cast iron or brass.

2) polish the copper.

3) wear nitrile gloves from this point on to avoid getting any skin oil on the part.

4) clean the part super well to get off any oxide, oil, wax, polishing compound, etc. On a cast part, this requires scrubbing with a stiff brush or use of an ultrasonic tank. I scrub with acetone and paper towels usually. Your test pieces of copper pipe are easy to clean. 

5) if desired, paint features on the part with a smear of grease or clear lacquer to keep parts shiny copper instead of black oxide. A paint brush is good. In the old days, a greasy finger was used.  Or, use a cut adhesive stencil and spray lacquer to add patterns or words. 

6) get a 3-M mask suitable for hydrocarbons, like solvents and paint. Not the dust type. The chemical is rather harmless, but stinks and can irritate your throat. 

7) get gel Liver of Sulphur. It is more reliable than the rock form. 

8) fill a suitable container (Tupperware is good) with a measured amount of hot tap water. You may have to use distilled water if your water is odd. 

9) outside, on a table that you don't care about, with your mask and gloves on, measure the liver of sulphur gel into the water. Usually 1 tsp per 12 oz of water. Stir. It turns the water yellow. 

10) place the copper part into the solution for a minute or two, flipping it and sloshing it around until it turns black. 

11) pull the part out and rinse it thoroughly in cold water. 

12) dry the part.

13) buff the part gently on an electric buffing wheel, using little or no rouge, until it is a shiny gray. If you buff too hard, you will expose copper. 

14) if desired, use rouge and buff hard on high spots in the casting to expose the copper. This is what I did on the oil cup. 

15) if desired, use Renaissance microcrystaline wax to protect the finish from oxidation and moisture.

16) dispose of the solution by pouring it on your outdoor garden. It is a fertilizer. 

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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 12:08 am
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David Hoatson
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Those fans are workhorses. People are amazed when they see how much air they move.
I know. I have 13 of them. 

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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 12:12 am
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David Hoatson
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Stencil:














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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 12:22 am
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David Hoatson
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The chemical:



The wax:



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 Posted: Wed Apr 4th, 2018 04:33 pm
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David Hoatson
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I've made more progress and hope to put it up for sale at the Aiken show in a few weeks. 


After oxidation:








Before polishing. Clear lacquer used as a mask:






After polishing;
















Last edited on Wed Apr 4th, 2018 04:34 pm by David Hoatson

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 Posted: Thu Apr 5th, 2018 07:28 pm
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David Hoatson
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The inside looks cool:


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 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2018 12:42 am
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Lucas Beshara
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That whole thing looks AWESOME David!

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 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2018 01:13 am
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David Hoatson
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Lucas Beshara wrote: That whole thing looks AWESOME David!
Thanks. It takes a lot of hours and a steady hand. 

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 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2018 01:28 pm
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David Hoatson
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Last edited on Fri Apr 6th, 2018 01:30 pm by David Hoatson

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 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2018 06:47 pm
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David Hoatson
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I cleaned up the switch. You can see its copper oxide finish. 







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 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2018 06:07 pm
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David Hoatson
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Wiring done except for the switch. 









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 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2018 06:42 pm
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David Allen
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David; that finish you put on there is amazing. It really looks as if the entire motor is copper.

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 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2018 07:56 pm
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David Hoatson
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David Allen wrote: David; that finish you put on there is amazing. It really looks as if the entire motor is copper.
Everything but the rotor was copper plated. I decided to keep the blade irons all copper, with no oxide. Emerson irons bolt to the top of the wood blade, so you can't hardly see them.


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 Posted: Mon Apr 9th, 2018 03:28 am
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David Hoatson
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All closed up, switch wired, started right up. 

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 Posted: Tue Apr 10th, 2018 06:14 pm
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David Hoatson
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 Posted: Tue Apr 10th, 2018 06:15 pm
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David Hoatson
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 Posted: Fri Apr 13th, 2018 04:23 pm
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David Hoatson
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I have the fan for sale at Aiken and in BST. 





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 Posted: Sat Apr 14th, 2018 12:34 am
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Tom Morel
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That looks fantastic.

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 Posted: Mon Apr 16th, 2018 12:30 am
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David Hoatson
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The fan had a minor wobble at first, but swapping two blades with each other made it perfect. I marked the proper positions with 1, 2, 3, or 4 punch marks on the blade irons and on the rotor:





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 Posted: Wed Apr 18th, 2018 01:36 am
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Ryan Blazei
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Love the look of this thing. Plating must of been thick enough to oxidize and sand down. Overall quality work!

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 Posted: Wed Apr 18th, 2018 02:20 am
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David Hoatson
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Ryan Blazei wrote: Love the look of this thing. Plating must of been thick enough to oxidize and sand down. Overall quality work!
Thanks. 

No sanding of the copper. Just polishing. All grinding or sanding to clean up the casting would have to be done prior to the copper plating, although none was done on this fan.

The electroplate is tricky because you want to plate evenly. Very little copper plated inside the oil cup, as the inside was kinda in the shadow of the electrode. If I had needed copper inside, we would have needed to design an electrode that went inside. Also, electroplating tends to build more copper on convex surfaces and less in concave surfaces due to the way the electric field interacts with the casting shape.

It is good to polish the copper before oxide to get it smooth and to eliminate the natural oxidation. The black copper oxide chemically is CuO, an oxide that does not normally occur. Cu2O is more common and is yellow/gold color. The common patina that you would find on a piece of copper left outside is, according to Google, a mixture of these:

brochantite (Cu4SO4(OH)6)


malachite (Cu2CO3(OH)2)


azurite (Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2)

Nickel plating can be done electrically or by electroless. The electroless plating is chemical and build an even thickness regardless of the surface contour.

I get a pro to do this, as it needs acid tanks for cleaning, a flash nickel to seal the iron, a system to knock bubbles off during plating, and a high amp, low voltage power supply. 

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