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Handy homemade Emerson blade removal tool  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 12:13 am
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Mike Eckenroad
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Nothing too fancy but very convenient and cheap to make. For what it costs and how much I use it, it's a must. I'm sure most of you know how this works but for those who don't, you just take out 2 of the screws that hold the oscillator housing on and thread these in there with equal pressure. For non oscillators it's even easier because there are (in most cases) already 2 threaded holes on the back right where you want them. I always use 2 because I have used one in the past and the blade was really tight and it kept slipping and eventually bent the tool and that was a pain to get out. You could probably get by with one in most cases but I like the even pressure and firm grip that 2 gives you. With one it can slip and Marr the rotor easily. These are just 1/4" hex bolts the length of your choice, longer is better and some nice USA made knobs that I get from my local woodworking supply, made by woodpecker. I'm sure you can get them online as well. Enjoy! 

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Last edited on Thu Jan 7th, 2016 12:17 am by Mike Eckenroad

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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 12:37 am
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Steve Stephens
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Looks good Mike and you won't misplace them with those red knobs that way I might with my ΒΌ" x 20 tpi allen screws.  My first blade removal try that didn't go as easy as some I bent the one threaded rod inside the motor and could not withdraw it.  I was finally able to fiddle around with the rod in a position that I did get the blade off.  Then the motor cover so I could withdraw the rod from the front of the motor.  Now I use two and hardened screws.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 02:02 am
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Chris A. Campbell
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Are these red handle woodpecker knobs pre threaded?

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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 03:22 am
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Kevin R. Braswell
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How about a picture of one in use Old Sport! A picture is worth a thousand words they say? Looks to be very handy.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 04:56 am
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Mike Eckenroad
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Ok I will post a pic as soon as I get a Chance. The hex head of the bolt actually snaps into the knob by either threading a nut down onto it to snap it in (and then it can be removed) or using a punch and smacking the hex had down into the knob. Once snapped in its nice and secure. The nice thing about these knobs is that you could also snap a nut down in there instead of the bolt and it would become female giving it the ability to thread onto something. I use these for all kinds of things like mounting jigs and motors temporally down to my work bench. 

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 Posted: Thu Jan 7th, 2016 05:02 am
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John McComas
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I was thinking of getting a couple that said "HOT" and "COLD" on them...
What do ya think?

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 Posted: Fri Jan 8th, 2016 02:24 am
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Chris Benbow
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Here is a picture of my very crude imitation of a single tool being used in the described manner. 

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Last edited on Fri Jan 8th, 2016 02:26 am by Chris Benbow

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 Posted: Fri Jan 8th, 2016 05:25 am
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Steve Stephens
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Before screwing or sticking anything into the motor be sure to look in there with a flashlight so you know there are no windings in the hole you plan to use.  I have seen it happen but not by me.

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 Posted: Fri Jan 8th, 2016 06:21 am
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Cory Baughn
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A very good friend gave me a tool he made, it is a very long set screw with a t-handle allen wrench brazed into the set screw. Looks professionally made and works like a charm!

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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 09:13 pm
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Mitch W. Romero
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That metal has to be hard .

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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 09:21 pm
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Chris Benbow
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Mitch W. Romero wrote: That metal has to be hard .
Yes!!
If you bend the screw it will be very difficult to remove.........

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 Posted: Sat Jan 9th, 2016 09:26 pm
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Mike Eckenroad
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That's why I use 2, and I make them long so if it does get bent you can thread it all the way through the front of the housing, once the rotor is out and the cut off the bent part. That being said I have never been able to bend both so 2 is pretty safe. I have bent the single one once when the blade was really really tight and I used the method I just described to get it out. 

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 Posted: Tue Jan 12th, 2016 12:41 am
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Blandon Ray
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Steve Stephens wrote: Before screwing or sticking anything into the motor be sure to look in there with a flashlight so you know there are no windings in the hole you plan to use.  I have seen it happen but not by me.
It happened to me on a 79648, the first Emerson I ever took apart... it seems the late models are a little different in proportions from the 77xxx and earlier. Drove the screw right into the stator - scraped up the insulation but fortunately didn't sever any windings completely. A good coat of spray varnish and it was okay.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 11th, 2020 08:01 pm
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Derek Warnecke
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Yep, tore right through the windings on my 77646-AL but not my 77646-AS due to the way the earlier stators were wrapped. Now I always check first with a flashlight.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 11th, 2020 11:03 pm
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Steve Stephens
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Here Is what I have purchased to lock Emerson rotors.  The smaller screws are for smaller Emersons (don't remember which ones) but I also came across another Emerson (possibly a Junior?) that used a third size of thread.    I like the hardened screws after a common screw bent inside the motor on an attempt to lock the rotor.  I also use two screws for that reason.   Pretty snug is good, not as tight as you can make the screws.



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