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AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Post-1950 (Vintage) > Servicing a Pryne Blo Fan with Redmond TL54 motor.

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Servicing a Pryne Blo Fan with Redmond TL54 motor.  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Mon May 15th, 2017 12:29 am
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Drew Fiore
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I stumbled across this forum looking for info about Pryne Blo Fan repair. Hope this is an ok place to ask questions about it. It's nothing exotic or even particularly exciting but I prefer repair over replacement when possible.
My kitchen exhaust fan has been squealing sometimes and having difficulty starting. I finally got around to pulling it down to see if I could lube it or otherwise service the bearings. Once I had the motor fully apart from the frame and blade I can see what looks like a grease port for the bearings at each end. I cleaned it enough to handle it and reassembled it; a few drops of oil into the holes seemed to confirm my guess but I'd like to know for sure.
The actual motor is marked as a Redmond TL54, I've found a few references to them as a manufacturer but not much else.

Can anyone confirm that I should be packing grease into this thing? It clearly has a bearing issue but I haven't found a way to separate the motor case and replace or repack them. It looks to be held together by 4 tubes that have been flared out at each end and I don't want to force these if that isn't how it separates.
Some pics:









I didn't think to take pics while it was apart, and I was covered in what was probably cooking oils older than me; but under the  lower arrow is another flared tube like above. The top one had slid partially out and was softer than expected when I pushed it back in, hence the bent opening.

Thanks for any info or advice I can get!
Drew

Last edited on Mon May 15th, 2017 12:30 am by Drew Fiore

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 Posted: Mon May 15th, 2017 03:02 pm
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Tom Zapf
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that is an oil bushing , not grease. those motors just get gunked up over time and a lot of people didnt even clean the fan let alone oil it. . the flared spout should take oil, but when you had it apart, was there an area around the bushing where there was a felt wick or something similar that should be soaked in oil? a little Marvel Mystery oil is good for a start when you have greasy old gook in the bushing and then add regular oil

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 Posted: Tue May 16th, 2017 02:43 am
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Drew Fiore
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Thanks for the reply. This is a cool forum to stumble upon, I wish I still had the 4-5 WW2 era fans I threw away when I cleared out a family house in Brooklyn NY. The totally exposed blades and intentionally pleasing designs were nice but only one worked, 2 had bare wire on the cords and they were definitely not kid safe by modern standards. I'll have to start looking at yard sales and flea markets.
I've fixed many things but have little experience with motors this old. It was certainly built to last. The motors in the appliances I work on daily will be dead in 10 years or less, it's a shame compared to this 60 yr old fan motor. 

I looked closer and from the diameter I figured it must have been meant for something thinner than grease so I shot a bunch of AeroKroil into it to verify that those tubes were clear. That made a difference in the noise when I ran it (and it smoked alot) so I forced a few eyedroppers worth drops of oil into each one and it sounded even better. I let it run with the fan attached for 20 minutes or so and it seemed fine.My wife was growing impatient for me to get out of the way and I was hungry so I remounted it and it is the best I have ever heard it, no more screeching and slow starts. It even runs at low speeds which it didn't like before. I love it when a fix requires no parts and is that simple.

My only concern is the temps the motor sees, with my laser temp gun the fins on it are about 125F after 10 minutes. It has those cooling fins so I assume it was expected to need some cooling. That seem abnormally hot or about right? 
[size=I see many dryers that have burned inside, sometimes pretty dramatically; they exhaust the smoke and the owner never knows. I don't want to be worried that][size= the motor is getting really hot and I'm just not smelling it.]
[size=
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[size=Thanks,]
[size=Drew]

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 Posted: Tue May 16th, 2017 04:09 am
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Duane Burright
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Drew Fiore wrote: My only concern is the temps the motor sees, with my laser temp gun the fins on it are about 125F after 10 minutes. It has those cooling fins so I assume it was expected to need some cooling. That seem abnormally hot or about right?
That temperature is fine, I've got a 1950's era Signal desk fan that hits 125, it'll run all day without issues. Be sure that you use a good non-detergent oil in those oil ports.

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