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AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Post-1950 (Vintage) > Identification of Drum Fan / Tube Axial Fan....

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Identification of Drum Fan / Tube Axial Fan....  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 02:50 am
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David Allen
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This mean dude has no markings at all. Has anyone seen anything like it?


It needs bearings. But in spite of that, it is powerful enough to try to slide its self across the floor!


Thanks for any insight on this one! I would like to know who made it. This fan is one of the items I picked up from the Lindale Mill along with the Sturtevant #6 Monogram Fan blower.

Thanks!
David


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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 03:22 am
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Russ Huber
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What are you going to do with it?  Ventilate a local Walmart? :D

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 03:25 am
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David Allen
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Well... if I don't accidentally remove arms or legs with it, I plan to use a more normal-size motor and make a workshop fan out of it to sell to someone who can use it. :P

It was in danger of being scrapped and I hardly paid anything for it so I had nothing to lose. :P

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 03:58 am
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Don Tener
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David Allen wrote: Well... if I don't accidentally remove arms or legs with it, I plan to use a more normal-size motor and make a workshop fan out of it to sell to someone who can use it. :P

It was in danger of being scrapped and I hardly paid anything for it so I had nothing to lose. :P
What voltage motor is on it? Couldn't you just put a variac on it to slow it down and that way who ever has it could still kick it up to super high for fun!

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 04:01 am
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David Allen
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Don Tener wrote: David Allen wrote: Well... if I don't accidentally remove arms or legs with it, I plan to use a more normal-size motor and make a workshop fan out of it to sell to someone who can use it. :P



It was in danger of being scrapped and I hardly paid anything for it so I had nothing to lose. :P

What voltage motor is on it? Couldn't you just put a variac on it to slow it down and that way who ever has it could still kick it up to super high for fun!


Hi Don.  It didn't have a motor. That motor is a 2HP 3-phase 480V motor running on a Allen-Bradley VFD. It's a test motor I use for various things. I was running the motor at about 3000 RPM, with the belt ratio the fan was probably running 1500 RPM or so.

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 04:06 am
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Don Tener
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David Allen wrote: Don Tener wrote: David Allen wrote: Well... if I don't accidentally remove arms or legs with it, I plan to use a more normal-size motor and make a workshop fan out of it to sell to someone who can use it. :P



It was in danger of being scrapped and I hardly paid anything for it so I had nothing to lose. :P

What voltage motor is on it? Couldn't you just put a variac on it to slow it down and that way who ever has it could still kick it up to super high for fun!


Hi Don.  It didn't have a motor. That motor is a 2HP 3-phase 480V motor running on a Allen-Bradley VFD. It's a test motor I use for various things. I was running the motor at about 3000 RPM, with the belt ratio the fan was probably running 1500 RPM or so.
I thought you had the original motor. It doesn't matter then. You can put anything you want on it.

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 04:11 am
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David Allen
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Don Tener wrote:

I thought you had the original motor. It doesn't matter then. You can put anything you want on it.


Sorry about the confusion. It was in the weedpatch without motor.


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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 09:55 am
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Henry Carrera
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With my luck the power cord would have sucked into the fan. :hammer:

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 01:50 pm
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Michael Rathberger
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This guy has had these for sale for awhile. Maybe you can work a deal with an Illinois member who goes to Florida for the winter...


 


https://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/atq/d/group-of-5-antique-electric/6308350575.html

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 03:40 pm
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Andrew Block
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Uhhhhhh I like that one :)

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 04:09 pm
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David Allen
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Henry Carrera wrote: With my luck the power cord would have sucked into the fan. :hammer:

LOL! That would be best described as a "SNAFU" for sure!










Michael Rathberger wrote:
This guy has had these for sale for awhile. Maybe you can work a deal with an Illinois member who goes to Florida for the winter...









Andrew Block wrote:

Uhhhhhh I like that one :)




Oh yes it has attitude and character.... it's very assertive!:cool:



Still hope someone has seen this blade design before and can put a name on it!


EDIT: Edited 4 times because of formatting messed up.








Last edited on Fri Sep 29th, 2017 04:13 pm by David Allen

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 05:25 pm
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Richard Daugird
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That is a neat fan, definitley power it with a VFD. All my shop fans will eventually be converted to VFD in the future.

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 05:33 pm
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Tom Zapf
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Ok i have seen that type of fan before. i rode the train for almost 24 years and in the next town there is a place that builds the cement box that goes in a gravesite to keep the walls up for placing the casket. They have a tower of some sort that is open on the sides and it has a conveyor belt in it that runs the cement dust mix in it. This fan is in the wall and it pulls out what appears to be very abrasive dust and dirt from the manufacturing process, so my guess is originally it would have had a closed sealed motor.... anyway i recognized this fan right away . the company had it just running open for years, and then they put an aluminum attic fan shutter over it and the weight of the dust has bent the vanes.... this is an exhaust fan for dirty harsh environment. ...tom

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 Posted: Fri Sep 29th, 2017 06:48 pm
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Jim Kovar
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Russ Huber wrote: Ventilate a local Walmart? :D
Maybe just a little too big to ventilate
a phone booth?   :wondering:   :shock:   :P

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 Posted: Sat Sep 30th, 2017 05:08 am
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David Allen
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Tom Zapf wrote: Ok i have seen that type of fan before. i rode the train for almost 24 years and in the next town there is a place that builds the cement box that goes in a gravesite to keep the walls up for placing the casket. They have a tower of some sort that is open on the sides and it has a conveyor belt in it that runs the cement dust mix in it. This fan is in the wall and it pulls out what appears to be very abrasive dust and dirt from the manufacturing process, so my guess is originally it would have had a closed sealed motor.... anyway i recognized this fan right away . the company had it just running open for years, and then they put an aluminum attic fan shutter over it and the weight of the dust has bent the vanes.... this is an exhaust fan for dirty harsh environment. ...tom

Makes sense - they would need a lot of ventilation to keep the dust from eroding the other machinery.


Jim Kovar wrote:
Russ Huber wrote: Ventilate a local Walmart? :D
Maybe just a little too big to ventilate
a phone booth?   :wondering:   :shock:   :P


LOL that would turn a phone booth into a wind tunnel, and take away the phone receiver and shred it! :shock:

By the way, I have received info that this is probably a Sheldons Engineering fan, or possibly a Kaiser fan.  Still looking for maker's marks on it!



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