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 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2017 01:09 am
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Bradley Holcomb
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I have a working Diehl G 10 AJ17 desk fan that I remember as a kid at my grandmothers house.  I would love to get it restored. The metallic blue paint is pretty chipped as well. I live in Phoenix if that makes any difference...

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 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2017 04:20 pm
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Craig Robbins
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Carl Parker. Search “The fan doctor”. He is in Texas but people send fans from all over. Welcome to the forum and Good luck

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 Posted: Fri Oct 6th, 2017 12:23 am
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Richard Daugird
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Ted Kaczor also deos excellent work, as well as many others on this forum. Maybe look around in the for sale section and look at fans that have been restored, for examples of their work.

http://www.afcaforum.com/forum2/48757.html
http://www.afcaforum.com/users/251.html

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 Posted: Fri Oct 6th, 2017 12:52 am
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Lane Shirey
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There's quite a difference between restoring fans for your own use or to resell, and doing work for a paying customer. 

Many excellent restorers don't do paid work for others because it is fairly difficult to estimate accurately, repairs on a 100 year old fan. It's very easy on a common fan to get more in repairs than it is worth, especially if something breaks in disassembly or if it needs a stator rewind. 


On a fan for resell, if it turns out to be a dog, often the fan becomes a parts fan to save other fans, but on a customer's fan, that's not an option. Also, proper fan restoration can involve 10++ hours. Even at minimum wage, labor alone can exceed the fan's value. 


I recently reluctantly agreed to restore an Eskimo that was a family heirloom owned by a relative. After hours of cleaning it up and performing maintenance, and doing some electrical work on it, realized that the stator was bad . I bought a running parts fan on my dime, only to find out it was also bad. I wound up putting it back together for them and while it runs great, it draws way too much and gets overly hot.  I gave it to them, charged them nothing, and lost 5 hours of my life I'll never get back. Never again!  This is what can happen. 


Best of success in finding someone to repair your fan, but please understand why you might not receive many or any takers. Your best bet if you're somewhat skilled , is to use the past posts in the forum to learn about your fan and others like it and repair it yourself. 


You also might get lucky and find a skilled member nearby you that is willing to help you to repair it. 

Cheers, 

Lane


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 Posted: Wed Oct 25th, 2017 06:56 pm
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Kevin Massey
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Lane Shirey wrote: There's quite a difference between restoring fans for your own use or to resell, and doing work for a paying customer. 

Many excellent restorers don't do paid work for others because it is fairly difficult to estimate accurately, repairs on a 100 year old fan. It's very easy on a common fan to get more in repairs than it is worth, especially if something breaks in disassembly or if it needs a stator rewind. 


On a fan for resell, if it turns out to be a dog, often the fan becomes a parts fan to save other fans, but on a customer's fan, that's not an option. Also, proper fan restoration can involve 10++ hours. Even at minimum wage, labor alone can exceed the fan's value. 


I recently reluctantly agreed to restore an Eskimo that was a family heirloom owned by a relative. After hours of cleaning it up and performing maintenance, and doing some electrical work on it, realized that the stator was bad . I bought a running parts fan on my dime, only to find out it was also bad. I wound up putting it back together for them and while it runs great, it draws way too much and gets overly hot.  I gave it to them, charged them nothing, and lost 5 hours of my life I'll never get back. Never again!  This is what can happen. 


Best of success in finding someone to repair your fan, but please understand why you might not receive many or any takers. Your best bet if you're somewhat skilled , is to use the past posts in the forum to learn about your fan and others like it and repair it yourself. 


You also might get lucky and find a skilled member nearby you that is willing to help you to repair it. 

Cheers, 

Lane


I usually check for proper electrical function before starting a restore.  That's a crappy way to have things work out.

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 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2017 12:51 am
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Larry White
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How much were you expect to pay? What type of restoration are you looking for? What is your turnaround expectation?

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 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2017 01:27 pm
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Jason Neill
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Lane Shirey wrote: There's quite a difference between restoring fans for your own use or to resell, and doing work for a paying customer. 

Many excellent restorers don't do paid work for others because it is fairly difficult to estimate accurately, repairs on a 100 year old fan. It's very easy on a common fan to get more in repairs than it is worth, especially if something breaks in disassembly or if it needs a stator rewind. 


On a fan for resell, if it turns out to be a dog, often the fan becomes a parts fan to save other fans, but on a customer's fan, that's not an option. Also, proper fan restoration can involve 10++ hours. Even at minimum wage, labor alone can exceed the fan's value. 


I recently reluctantly agreed to restore an Eskimo that was a family heirloom owned by a relative. After hours of cleaning it up and performing maintenance, and doing some electrical work on it, realized that the stator was bad . I bought a running parts fan on my dime, only to find out it was also bad. I wound up putting it back together for them and while it runs great, it draws way too much and gets overly hot.  I gave it to them, charged them nothing, and lost 5 hours of my life I'll never get back. Never again!  This is what can happen. 


Best of success in finding someone to repair your fan, but please understand why you might not receive many or any takers. Your best bet if you're somewhat skilled , is to use the past posts in the forum to learn about your fan and others like it and repair it yourself. 


You also might get lucky and find a skilled member nearby you that is willing to help you to repair it. 

Cheers, 

Lane


And this is the same reason I no longer do electronic restorations on TVs, stereos, phonographs, etc. for the public.

I generally tell people that inquire about such services when they're contemplating buying such an item that "they'd better learn to fix it themselves".

Last edited on Mon Oct 30th, 2017 01:27 pm by Jason Neill

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 Posted: Mon Oct 30th, 2017 11:02 pm
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Levi Mevis
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I do such repairs for people but I don't charge a whole lot for my services because I know that its a loosing proposition to do such restoration work for people when I have to buy parts such as capacitors or needles or other items on my dime (when I don't have much money for stuff to begin with) so I actually ask customers for money upfront for the repairs so I'm not having to pay for any parts needed on my dime. Or else I just repair stuff for myself, and then turn around and resell the item, altough even that can be a loosing propositon because I've had to basically give away a couple of items for free in order to get rid of them because I couldn't sell them for what they were worth in their current condition.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 4th, 2017 03:57 am
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Larry White
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Amen....

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