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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 06:22 am
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Russ Huber
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Menominee AC or DC 12" fan motors have first mention in electrical trade in 1911.  They were described of the commutator type with .......laminated stator. The only 12" models in 1911 to fit this description was the Menominee roundball.  It is my distinct impression the Menominee roundball was marketed for the fan motor seasons of 1911-13.



I am going to post 4 roundballs from what I am confident represent a timeline of 1911 through 12-13. See if you can spot feature changes. 





  

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HudsonWingthumb.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 06:34 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 06:31 am
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Russ Huber
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Menominee fan motor line for 1913.


Electrical Review and Western Electrician, March 8, 1913, Page, 527.

Below is the Menominee fan motor line CLAIMED in the 13 article.

 

Menominee direct current fan motors:

8" blade 10 volt battery fan with trunnion base.

3 speed 110 volt swivel and trunnion fans marketed in sizes 9", 12", and 16" 

Universal motor(AC/DC) fans are claimed marketed in several forms and sizes:

3 speed 8" stationary fan of the trunnion type.

3 speed oscillating fans are offered in 8", 12", and 16" sizes for desk or bracket.(It is noted the oscillator is of the WORM GEAR type mounted in a gear case at the rear of the fan.)

3 speed 8" sweep table fan designed for restaurant and dining table.(fan collector slang for the fan is TELLER FAN.)

Alternating current commutator desk and bracket fan listed separately:

3 speed 12" commutator type alternating current fan with swivel and trunnion construction that can be easily converted from desk to bracket without additional parts. The commutator has 36 segments.

Alternating current induction motor desk fans:

3 speed induction motor fans of simple construction are made in 12" and 16" sizes. They are offered in both stationary or oscillating models. IT IS CLEARLY STATED THE INDUCTION MOTOR OSCILLATING MODELS HAVE THE SAME OSCILLATING MECHANISM AS THE COMMUTATOR MODELS.  

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 02:48 pm
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Dave McManaman
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1. Switch moved and became a lever. 2. Ventilating added to the motor housing. 3.  Flat to Profile struts. 4. Round then tab foot. 5. Identification tag. 

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:07 pm
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Russ Huber
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Dave McManaman wrote: 1. Switch moved and became a lever. 2. Ventilating added to the motor housing. 3.  Flat to Profile struts. 4. Round then tab foot. 5. Identification tag. 
#6..?


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Stampedring.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:08 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:21 pm
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Russ Huber
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Dave McManaman wrote: 1. Switch moved and became a lever. 2. Ventilating added to the motor housing. 3.  Flat to Profile struts. 4. Round then tab foot. 5. Identification tag. 
#7..?
Attached Image (viewed 2 times):




Attached Image (viewed 155 times):

Waferthumbscrew.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:24 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:21 pm
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Dave McManaman
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6. Two bigger rivets on the blades rather than three smaller?

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:30 pm
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Russ Huber
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Dave McManaman wrote: 6. Two bigger rivets on the blades rather than three smaller?
Not sure what is up with the rivet issue.  The emphasis with #6 variant is the ........center guard ring. SOMEWHERE between 1912 and 13 Menominee went to the  smaller stamped center guard ring.

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:30 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:39 pm
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Russ Huber
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#7 ......Menominee dumped the use of the knurled wafer screw downs on the pivot and swivel feature and went to the winged thumb screw SOMEWHERE between 1912 and 13.

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:41 pm
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Russ Huber
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1912 Menominee induction motor image with SMALLER guard center ring and fiber switch lever.

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-2.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:41 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:48 pm
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Russ Huber
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In June of 1912 Farr Telephone & Construction Supply Co. announces their agency for Menominee fan motors.  This Farr badged Menominee 8" tab foot is proof that Menominee was still using the 1910 Menominee introduction fan motor features.


1912 Menominee fan motors must of been going  through a transition.  There had to be a mix of old features along with the new features to become gospel for the 13 fan motor season.


 

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Farr12.jpg

Last edited on Sat Nov 11th, 2017 03:49 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2017 04:53 pm
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Russ Huber
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Images shared and credited to Darryl  Hudson, Alan Wilms, Stefan Osdene, John Trier,  and Ron Jeter.


If I missed something or somebody, sorry.

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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 12:17 am
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Levi Mevis
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So my 8" Staghorn Oscillator which we figured out to be a 1914, was the first year for the non-tabfoot style fan (or as you called it the bell style base), if I'm understanding you correctly. Was it also the first year for the Staghorn style struts, and the rectangular Menominee Badge that's riveted to the center of the cage ring? Just curious where my fan falls on the Menominee fan timeline. 

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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 01:09 am
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Bruce Allen
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and 6.    Top of base where knuckle bolts from round to ovoid

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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 01:41 am
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John Trier
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Good stuff Russ....... The Menominee people were weird.   In the age of cast brass parts they used stamped brass struts.   The neck bolt (prior to wing nut) was nickeled ....... the only part of the entire fan that had nickel plating along with the vertical switch knob in the first photo.  I assume to preserve the finish on those parts.  

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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 03:09 am
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Russ Huber
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1913- "Has improved its line of Electric fans."

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13.jpg

Last edited on Sun Nov 12th, 2017 03:11 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 03:30 am
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Russ Huber
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John Trier wrote: The Menominee people were weird.   In the age of cast brass parts they used stamped brass struts. 
GE used flat and profile top mount guard supports 10+  and it appears Tideman thought they would look good on his fans? Holtzer Cabot used a unique guard and supports on their 19th century fan motors, a unique ball motor DC fan motor with laminated stator.  It  appears Tideman ran with Holtzer's ideas.  The 1910 AC/DC universal motor fan Tideman placed on the market is a dead ringer for and 06 patent vibrator motor from Eureka of Detroit.  Tideman was first established in Detroit prior to moving to Menominee. No doubt he made some engineering related connections in Detroit.


In a nut shell Tideman was not a Lundell.  :D

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