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Removing fan blades from motor shaft  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sun Feb 4th, 2018 11:49 pm
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Tom Seguin
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I Have a Mathes Cooler with the bullet nose fan with the fins.  I have removed both set screws but I still cannot get the fan blade off the shaft.  It feels like there may be another set screw that I can find.  There is a little play up and down but stops like it is catching on something.  Anyone have any suggestions?

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 Posted: Mon Feb 5th, 2018 09:56 am
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Lane Shirey
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Try putting some good penetrating oil into the set screw holes and then let it work. The other possibility is that the setscrew was tightened very hard and raised a burr on the shaft. This can be a more stubborn problem but the penetrant will help in either case. 

Sometimes there is a second set screw underneath the ones you removed, but I doubt that fan is set up that way. Usually only the big air circulators. 


Just don't torque too much on the wings or you risk bending them or loosening the rivets. 


Best of luck with removing it. 

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 Posted: Wed Feb 7th, 2018 07:46 pm
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Tom Nordin
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Hi Tom,
I hope you don't to attempt to resort to it, but I've had to use a gear puller on some fans in the past:



With your note about a 'bullet nose' no so sure this would work without removing that nose, if possible.  The other issue is whether there is enough room down near the hub where those jaws can grip the back of the hub without damaging the blades - in my cases I was exceedingly lucky that there was a kind of oval opening between the blades near the hub that allowed those jaws clearance - many blade assemblies just don't have such an opening.  Unfortunately looking at one of my MC's there is zero chance of using this style of gear puller with its particular blades.

There are many styles of gear pullers available - maybe there is something you could use if all else fails?

Pictures of different gear pullers

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 Posted: Thu Feb 8th, 2018 04:54 pm
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Richard Daugird
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You may have to fabricate a puller. I have a Mathis Cooler that was a daily runner in my office and just quit, so I will likely be doing this soon myself.

Last edited on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 04:54 pm by Richard Daugird

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 Posted: Sat Feb 10th, 2018 12:32 am
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Tom Seguin
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I have a gear puller but there is no way to use it.  My fan has a bullet nose which means there is no center for the rod.  I'm going to have to build something where I can mount the motor and apply equal pressure to the back side of the fan and try to hit it off with a hammer.  I don't see any other way.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 10th, 2018 10:39 am
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Lane Shirey
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Have you tried the penetrating oil? And use pb blaster, croil or another high quality penetrant, not wd40. Also try heating the hub with a heat gun it'll help the penetrant to creep into the frozen areas. You'll probably need to use screwdrivers to gently but firmly persuade the blade off. If the front end bell comes off the motor , you might be able to remove the blade, rotor, endcap together and then attempt to remove it once the rotor is out. 

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 Posted: Sat Feb 10th, 2018 12:39 pm
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Tom Nordin
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I'm thinking Tom might have one that has a hub like this?



Here's a decent video that shows that hub (edit - a similar hub) up-close, including the set-screw holes:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-dPDRIZ3iE

Last edited on Sat Feb 10th, 2018 12:44 pm by Tom Nordin

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 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2018 01:39 am
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Tom Seguin
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Yep, that's what I have.  I have sprayed penetrating oil into both set screw holes but there is no way to get a screwdriver in there or anything else to pry the fan off.  I think I have devised a plan to mount the motor upside down and make a bracket that will sit on the edge of the fan back so I can tap it with a hammer and get even pressure on two sides.  Outside of that I have no idea.

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 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2018 01:16 am
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Dan Foley
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Tom, is there any way you can lock the rotor in place? If you're able to do that, you may be able to gently twist the blade to see if it comes loose.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 17th, 2018 01:02 am
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Tom Nordin
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Dan Foley wrote: Tom, is there any way you can lock the rotor in place? If you're able to do that, you may be able to gently twist the blade to see if it comes loose.

That's a really good idea, Dan - sort of the way old Emerson blades are removed.

Tom, can you see if there are any holes in the back side of the motor where you can stick a hanger-sized post into that could lock the motor stationary?  If so, do that, then like Dan says start twisting the blade by hand to see if you can't get the likely-burr to give-way...

P.S. - back & forth motion might be good   :D

P.P.S. - careful about sticking stuff in the back of the motor - eyeball things so you don't hit motor wires.   :D  :D

Last edited on Sat Feb 17th, 2018 01:07 am by Tom Nordin

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 Posted: Sat Feb 17th, 2018 03:48 am
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Dan Foley
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I've had to use that method on a few of my own fans, otherwise the blades flat out would not come off the rotor shaft. Hopefully the rotor on this fan is easily accessible through the vents.

Tom, that's also an excellent point in regards to watching out for the stator coils...I've almost had a screwdriver slip and dig in before. It's a great way to make your heart stop!

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 Posted: Sat Feb 17th, 2018 11:24 am
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Lawrence Smith
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if worse comes to worse, remove the whole motor assembly out the back side, you might be able to split the motor & then safely lock the rotor. On the 6 winger I had -- the blade was also locked onto the shaft. I finally cleaned around the assembly, then dribbled zoom spout into the bearing & ran the fan. Wished I had kept that one. Lawrence

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