AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Post-1950 (Vintage) > Manning Bowman Model 41 How old is it?

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Rod Rogers, Larry Hancock
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Manning Bowman Model 41 How old is it?  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Jul 1st, 2018 06:59 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Scott Matthew
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Jul 1st, 2018
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Hi,
I just found this forum today after picking up an old Manning Bowman Model 41 fan at an Estate Sale down the street from me.  
I have been wanting to pick up an older/vintage fan like this for some time but every time I run across one it is usually at an Antique Mall and they are kind of pricey.  As I mentioned I stumbled across this one at Estate Sale and it was only $5 so I thought I would take a chance on it.

I got it home plugged it in and seems to run pretty well. 

I have a few questions for  you fine folks here as I know nothing about these old fans.

First of all I am curious how old it might be?  The badge says McGraw Edison Co. which I understand was not formed until 1957 so I am assuming it's a late 50's model?

I am also looking for any pointers on cleaning it up. Should I attempt to clean it or just leave it as is? Also any other maintenance I might need to perform to keep the motor running?

Also does it appear to have all original parts?  Is there a common part that is usually replaced/missing on these old fans that I should be looking at? I can provide more photos.  No idea why all the pictures are coming up sideways, sorry about that!
Thanks,
Scott
















Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:12 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Levi Mevis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 24th, 2015
Location: Elkhart, Indiana USA
Status: 
Online
McGraw-Edison company is actually from the 1920s your fan is from the late 1940s, your fan should have some oil ports inside the motor housing on the motor itself that you should put some 3-in-1 in the blue can into as for the oscillator gearbox there should be a way to open it up and clean out the old grease and replace with new grease of the Lucas Red n' Tacky variety or Wheel Bearing Grease variety.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:20 am
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Scott Matthew
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Jul 1st, 2018
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Levi Mevis wrote: McGraw-Edison company is actually from the 1920s your fan is from the late 1940s, your fan should have some oil ports inside the motor housing on the motor itself that you should put some 3-in-1 in the blue can into as for the oscillator gearbox there should be a way to open it up and clean out the old grease and replace with new grease of the Lucas Red n' Tacky variety or Wheel Bearing Grease variety.
Thank you for the information Levi, it's greatly appreciated!

I guess I should have known better than to rely on wikipedia for information on McGraw-Edison.  They say the company didn't form until 1957 when McGraw Electric purchased Thomas A. Edison Inc.

It's pretty amazing this little fan still runs so well after all these years.  I miss the good old days when thinks were built to last!

Thanks again,
Scott

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:28 am
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Levi Mevis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 24th, 2015
Location: Elkhart, Indiana USA
Status: 
Online
Yep, Wikipedia is definitely not always 100% accurate, when it comes to information about stuff like old defunct American Companies. 
McGraw-Edison company can most definitely be dated to well before the 1950s as they were the parent company of Toastmaster and they made stuff as far back as the 1920s. Eskimo and Zero were two other manufacturers that McGraw-Edison owned and the McGraw-Edison ownership of Eskimo dates back to the late 1920s, before that Eskimo was its own independent fan manufacturer.

Last edited on Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 02:29 am by Levi Mevis

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 01:42 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Raymond Lowry
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Dumfries, Virginia USA
Status: 
Offline
Not a 40's fan. I have one in the box exactly like this and the sales slip says 1972. It came from Western Auto.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 03:30 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Scott Matthew
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Jul 1st, 2018
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
Raymond Lowry wrote: Not a 40's fan. I have one in the box exactly like this and the sales slip says 1972. It came from Western Auto.Hmm the mystery continues!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jul 3rd, 2018 02:34 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Ryan Lemke
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Aug 25th, 2009
Location: Mansfield, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
Great find Scott! And at a pretty unbelievable price too for one in such great condition. I would not run it in oscillating mode too much  though. This fan design is inherintly flawed and many of them end up binding  or stripping their gears. A simple adjustment in the linkage  will run it stationary. Search for a posting on  this site entitled "Wizard, Zero, Eskimo, Manning Bowman Refresh for beginners". There are also many other good break down posts of these dime-store fans. Good luck!

Last edited on Tue Jul 3rd, 2018 02:35 pm by Ryan Lemke

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Sun Jul 22nd, 2018 02:22 pm
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Michael Mirin
AFCA Member


Joined: Wed Mar 28th, 2007
Location: Merrillville, Indiana USA
Status: 
Offline
Hello Scott, McGraw-Edison was formed in 1957. Prior to that is was McGraw Electric. McGraw bought the Bersted MFG company from 1948.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2018 01:35 am
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
David Northam
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Thu Jan 5th, 2006
Location: Richmond, Virginia USA
Status: 
Offline
Yes, your fan is definitely much newer than 1940's. Bersted was the older company that produced a lot of "budget line" fans in the late 40's and 50's as all of the GI's came home from the war, got married and were setting up households. Like most young couples starting out, they all wanted household products, but there was a demand for less expensive good compared to older household products. So, instead of saving up to buy one fan which was treasured, they wanted to buy something quickly and maybe have 2 or 3 around the house.

Some fan models lasted numerous years and looked identical or very similar. Ray is correct that all metal fans like this were sold into the 1970's, but still possible yours might be a tad older back into the 1960's.

As a very young kid in the late 60's, I already had a keen interest in fans. I can remember always going into McCrory's (our local 5 and dime store) to look at the fan displays. There were the "all metal" fans similar to yours. Then "all of a sudden" one year they started stocking Galaxy fans which had a white plastic body and blue plastic translucent blades with the push-button "piano key" speed controls. I loved the shiny metal fans, but the new fans with the blue blades were soooo cool back then.

Although I called your fan "budget line," they were still good fans compared to the new crap made overseas. You good a great deal and I hope you enjoy the fan!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2018 01:58 am
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Scott Matthew
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Jul 1st, 2018
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
I was told by one collector that electronics made after 1969 would have said 60 hz instead of 60 cycles. Any truth to that?

If so I can at least narrow it down to a manufacture date sometime between 1957-1969.



Thanks again for all the feedback!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jul 25th, 2018 05:41 am
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Austin Ko
AFCA Member


Joined: Wed Mar 5th, 2014
Location: Edison, New Jersey USA
Status: 
Offline
Levi Mevis wrote: Yep, Wikipedia is definitely not always 100% accurate, when it comes to information about stuff like old defunct American Companies. 
McGraw-Edison company can most definitely be dated to well before the 1950s as they were the parent company of Toastmaster and they made stuff as far back as the 1920s. Eskimo and Zero were two other manufacturers that McGraw-Edison owned and the McGraw-Edison ownership of Eskimo dates back to the late 1920s, before that Eskimo was its own independent fan manufacturer.
I would have to say Wikipedia has more accuracy then what you just posted. Toastmaster was a sub division after McGraw Electric bought the Waters Genter Co that produced the first commercially made pop up toaster named the Toastmaster. Eskimo and Zero were  never "manufacturers" they were brand names slapped on the fans at the Bersted/McGraw Edison plant. McGraw Electric or McGraw Edison (cant be this because they didnt exist) never had ownership of the Eskimo trademark in the 1920's. Eskimo was a name that UNITED ELECTRIC CO used on their fans up until around the late 1930's when Al Bersted bought them out after Al had just recently bought his Bersted division back from McGraw Electric Co thus using this newly acquired trademark on his line of fans. This also proves that Eskimo was never an independent fan manufacturer. I really wish you would fact check before you post because you are not helping new members by telling them wrong info on things. This is not the first time I have seen you post extremely wrong info directed to a newbie.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 25th, 2018 07:17 am
  PMQuoteReply
12th Post
Levi Mevis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 24th, 2015
Location: Elkhart, Indiana USA
Status: 
Online
Austin Ko wrote: Levi Mevis wrote: Yep, Wikipedia is definitely not always 100% accurate, when it comes to information about stuff like old defunct American Companies. 
McGraw-Edison company can most definitely be dated to well before the 1950s as they were the parent company of Toastmaster and they made stuff as far back as the 1920s. Eskimo and Zero were two other manufacturers that McGraw-Edison owned and the McGraw-Edison ownership of Eskimo dates back to the late 1920s, before that Eskimo was its own independent fan manufacturer.
I would have to say Wikipedia has more accuracy then what you just posted. Toastmaster was a sub division after McGraw Electric bought the Waters Genter Co that produced the first commercially made pop up toaster named the Toastmaster. Eskimo and Zero were  never "manufacturers" they were brand names slapped on the fans at the Bersted/McGraw Edison plant. McGraw Electric or McGraw Edison (cant be this because they didnt exist) never had ownership of the Eskimo trademark in the 1920's. Eskimo was a name that UNITED ELECTRIC CO used on their fans up until around the late 1930's when Al Bersted bought them out after Al had just recently bought his Bersted division back from McGraw Electric Co thus using this newly acquired trademark on his line of fans. This also proves that Eskimo was never an independent fan manufacturer. I really wish you would fact check before you post because you are not helping new members by telling them wrong info on things. This is not the first time I have seen you post extremely wrong info directed to a newbie.

Actually What I said about Wikipedia not being 100% accurate is correct in fact most educational institutions like Colleges, High Schools, Jr. High schools, etc. absolutely will NOT allow you to use Wikipedia as a citation source when writing research papers because of the fact that Wikipedia articles can be changed/altered with any information anyone wants to put into it at any time and the information doesn't necessarily have to be cited to a real source. 

As for Toastmaster, it has been around since the 1920s it may not of always been a subsidiary of McGraw-Edison the entire time, but Toastmaster as a company IS an old company.

As for Eskimo, I NEVER said anything about Eskimo being its own company, I am fully aware that Eskimo was a trademark name that was originally owned by United Electric Company which was a subsidiary of General Motors (it was the parent company of Delco, which made everything from Sparkplugs to radios to fans, and everything in between). 

And Austin, I don't know if I've told you this before, but I'll tell you this again, I do NOT appreciate how you treat me on here, you and your attitude towards me, and how you like to publically berade me on this forum just because I make minor mistakes about misidentifying something about a company who made a fan or whatever, especially when you say that EVERYTHING I said is false when that isn't true, the only thing that was false about my statement to this guy was when Bersted took over the Eskimo name, and that was it. The rest of my statement was all true. 

As for when McGraw-Edison came into being, I won't trust the 1957 date given in the Wikipedia or on here until someone gives me credible proof that that was when they truly were established, (with all of the historical documentation archived on this website it shouldn't be that hard to produce and old ad or a newspaper article that says when McGraw-Edison came into being) because as far as I'm concerned McGraw-Edison is actually an older company than 1957 because I have a Toastmaster Branded Waffle Iron/Griddler that has to date to at least 1956 or earlier because my grandparents had one just like it that they got as a wedding gift, and they were married in 1956 and the Toastmaster Waffle Iron/Griddler says "McGraw-Edison Toastmaster" on the handle. 

So try explaining that to me Austin. 


Also Austin, this is no place to trash talk me, if you want to trash talk me, do it through PMs so you don't clutter up this poor guy's thread and drag it off topic!


Last edited on Wed Jul 25th, 2018 12:08 pm by Levi Mevis

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Jul 25th, 2018 12:01 pm
  PMQuoteReply
13th Post
Levi Mevis
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Tue Feb 24th, 2015
Location: Elkhart, Indiana USA
Status: 
Online
Scott Matthew wrote: I was told by one collector that electronics made after 1969 would have said 60 hz instead of 60 cycles. Any truth to that?

If so I can at least narrow it down to a manufacture date sometime between 1957-1969.



Thanks again for all the feedback!

Actually it was around 1960 when the General Conference on Weights and Measures (GCWM) decided to standardize electrical frequency to Hertz, KiloHertz, MegaHertz, GigaHertz, etc, rather than the old Cycles Per Second (CPS), Megacycles, Kilocycles, Gigacycles, etc. that had been in use from 1865 until 1960 when they decided to change it to Hertz in honor of Heinrich Hertz the discoverer of electrical frequencies/cycles. 
Although it took many companies such as radio, appliance, and fan manufacturers almost a decade to finally adopt the Hertz, Megahertz, and Kilohertz designations for marking their electrical and radio frequencies. 

This can be seen especially in radio manufacturers and appliance manufacturers who continued to use Cycles for electrical frequency designation and Megacycles and Kilocycles for radio frequency designation on radios as late as the early 1970s especially on some of the Japanese made Stereo systems like Pioneer, Kenwood/Trio and Panasonic/Technics which had stereo equipment listing electrical frequency in Cycles per second as late as 1970. So more or less the change over from using Cycles to Hertz was gradually instated over the course of a decade between 1960 and 1970.  

And this information was sourced from a source other than Wikipedia! Wikipedia Should only be used as a point of reference, and that's it, it should NEVER be your primary source of information!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

Current time is 11:34 am  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Post-1950 (Vintage) > Manning Bowman Model 41 How old is it? Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.2188 seconds (12% database + 88% PHP). 34 queries executed.