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blade repair advice  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Mon Jul 2nd, 2018 10:18 pm
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David Kilnapp
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I acquired a freshened air fan which works fine though the blade is somewhat damaged:




You can see that both ends are rather chewed up. Is there a way to repair this blade in a way so that the force of the rotation doesn't destroy the bonded material? I'm at a loss as to how to deal with this.


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 Posted: Tue Jul 3rd, 2018 01:49 pm
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David Allen
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In my opinion, that would be fixable with body filler such as Bondo. You would need to sand down the chipped edges to expose fresh material and give it a rough surface. Then it would be a matter of building it up and sanding it into the original shape of the blade tip.

The only issue here is that it would have to be painted afterwards to look like it was all bakelite.

I'm sure there are other methods, but that's what I would do if it were mine. Not that I have the bodywork skills to make it look like it never happened LOL! :imao

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 Posted: Tue Jul 3rd, 2018 07:27 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Thanks Dave. I'll give that a try.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 5th, 2018 04:04 am
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Patrick Ray
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I would personally use fiberglass as it's a better repair option as it's stronger and more durable than Bondo. Bondo is good for filling imperfections where it has something backing it, such as a dent. But when building something outward like that, I would opt for fiberglass.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 5th, 2018 01:43 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Another good suggestion! Thanks.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 5th, 2018 02:10 pm
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David Allen
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Patrick Ray wrote: I would personally use fiberglass as it's a better repair option as it's stronger and more durable than Bondo. Bondo is good for filling imperfections where it has something backing it, such as a dent. But when building something outward like that, I would opt for fiberglass.



This is true, and maybe I am not seeing the extent of the missing piece.  It seemed that there was just some chipping of the ends of the blade, where it would need about 1/8 inch of buildup.

Using the fiberglass paste (kitty-hair) sometimes is difficult when the area is so small. The strands want to straighten out and make air pockets in the repair.

If the area is sort of an in-between size where neither bondo nor fiberglass seem to be appropriate, then an epoxy could be used. It would be sandable like the bondo, but wouldn't have strings in it like the fiberglass. Just another option!


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 Posted: Thu Jul 5th, 2018 02:14 pm
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Lawrence Smith
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I'm following this as I have a micarta blade with a small chip-- please update when a solution has been tried & let us know how it holds up to a whirling fan!!

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 Posted: Fri Jul 6th, 2018 09:55 pm
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David Kilnapp
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My freshn'd air blade isn't made from Micarta. Micarta is more of a paper and resin product (invented by George Westinghouse). I saw a bunch of those Micarta Westy's at the Brimfield flea market in Western MA in May (I'm going again next Tuesday). I bet you could find a replacement for your chipped blade fairly easily.

Last edited on Fri Jul 6th, 2018 09:59 pm by David Kilnapp

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 Posted: Mon Jul 9th, 2018 12:28 am
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Lawrence Smith
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I understand the micarta difference, just wanting to see if the bondo holds up to a repair, I have freshy's with chipped blades also.   I was hoping for a real world test versus theory. I suppose JB weld would also work

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 Posted: Mon Jul 9th, 2018 02:30 am
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Russ Huber
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FWIW...you don't need to go through all the "build it up" brewhah.  Using a garage sale hand held power sander you carefully and EVENLY reshape the ends of the chipped blade. Your going to lose some blade length but nothing significant.  You can check the blade for even weight from hub hole to blade tip using a Dubro dynamic blade balancer. They can be found on the web and are cheap and easy to use. The heavy end of the blade drops to the bottom. You just gradually shave the excess weight of the heavy end  of the blade until ….no more heavy wing drop.


When you have it right you can polish that Bakelite blade to a high luster end to end with buffing wheel and rouge.



   

Attached Image (viewed 51 times):

finishing-sander-MAKITA-model-B04550-Works-good-used-_1.jpg

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 Posted: Mon Jul 9th, 2018 12:03 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Russ: This is exactly what I did and it worked like a charm. I'll post pictures after I get the clips you are sending me.

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