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 Posted: Tue Aug 7th, 2018 05:17 pm
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Tom Miele
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i am a new member and years ago purchased an R&M 9604 ceiling fan. I am trying to make the fan work and also want to make sure it is safe for use in my home. Could someone please help me with the following?
What year is my fan?

Was my fan one speed or did I it have 2 or 3 speeds? When I turned the fan on, it had a 3 speed switch but on closer examination I noticed two of these switch leads are connected to each other. Additionally there are only two leads (in and out) of the coil (pictured). 

What type of switch does my fan take? And - Where can I buy the correct switch for my fan?

How many milliliters of oil does the fan take to lubricate the lower bearing? I added about 1 ml and the bearing still makes noise during operation.

Do you recommend the use of liquid electrical tape to seal older wires?

Thank you

Tom



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 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2018 02:41 am
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Evan Atkinson
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Tom-

Your R&M art deco ceiling fan was called their "Style T" fan.  Style T was the smaller size of this model made, "Style U" was the larger size.  1934 is what I remember, but I'd have to double-check that to be sure of the circa.


I think your fan was originally a two-speed fan.  If I recall, the catalog from this year states this information.


Your fan used a Levolier style pull-chain switch, mounted inside that lower housing. Sometimes, your fan was outfitted with an electric light within that lower housing; in that case, a second Levolier switch was installed on the opposite side of the housing as the speed control switch. If the fan was ordered with the light, a special wide fitter that came with your fan held an inverted domed glass shade.  Again, the catalog showed an illustration of this setup.


Don't know about the amount of oil this fan requires, but I do know R&M used wool packing around the bearing that was saturated with oil to wick through the bearing to the central shaft.  If it operates noisily, there's likely bearing wear, or the bearing is not being lubricated adequately.  It should operate silently.


I don't recommend liquid electrical tape to seal older wires.  I use heat shrink to insulate any bare areas, but generally prefer to nip off old wires and replace them with period looking new wire, to mitigate against any of the multitude of risks that can accompany old, brittle wiring.


They're neat fans.

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 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2018 02:45 pm
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Tom Miele
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Evan

Thank you very much for your help! Applying what I learned from you now and look forward to bringing my fan back to regular service!

Tom

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 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2018 08:38 pm
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Tom Miele
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Believe this may be a dumb question but here goes; I added oil into the top hole of the fan marked "oil" it is a relatively large opening - maybe 3/8 to 1/2". I did this while it was running (slow speed) and oil rained out after only a small amount had been added. I then tried to add oil while the fan was off but experienced the same issue with oil raining once the fan was turned on. On close examination of the oil hole, I noticed an inner groove which I believe is the upper bearing, and directed the oil to this. Much less oil came out when the fan started but the sound of the (dry) bearing was still there. Is there any advice you can give on how to oil this fan correctly? I have not added a huge amount so far and would like direction before I create a problem! I just want the bearing sound to disappear.

Finally, if I have to take the fan apart, what tool would I use to remove what looks like a threaded cast iron end piece/retainer (not a nut as I would have expected). Looks like a screwdriver shaft would go through this but I'm worried it would break with the torque required to untighten it.

Thank you

Tom

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 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2018 10:35 pm
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Evan Atkinson
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When you look through the oil hole and shine a flashlight, you should be able to see the wool packing.  When you use an oiler with a spout, you are impregnating the wool packing material with oil for the sleeve bearings; this motor doesn’t use an oil bath system for lubrication.  If you can’t see the brownish wool material, someone may have dug it out, in which case you’ll need to replace it.

The symptom you describe, of oil “raining” down on you and through the fan motor, sounds like that’s what’s happened.  You’ll need to dismantle the motor to reinstall the packing.  I never took mine all the way apart, but I think the motor separates easily, once that nut fixture on the bottom central rod is removed.  Don’t quote me on that!

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 Posted: Tue Aug 14th, 2018 05:35 pm
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Tom Miele
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To AllAfter trying every possible way to oil the bearing, I decided to try to take the fan apart to clean and lubricate the bearings and other internal parts. The good news is the "nut" which held the fan together came off with out breaking. The bad news is the fan does not come apart as I had expected. Is the lower portion pressed on and requires a puller ? I'm afraid to pry this and wondered if I should try tapping it with a rubber mallet ? Would appreciate your help with the next action to get the fan apart. Thank you 

Tom 


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 Posted: Tue Aug 14th, 2018 06:11 pm
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Evan Atkinson
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Try grabbing the whole lower body and turning it counter-clockwise, looks as though it unscrews from that central shaft. The cast retaining fixture locks the whole assembly together.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 14th, 2018 09:08 pm
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Tom Miele
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Success! The shaft did not thread on but was tight enough to need to be worked off by grabbing the top and bottom and moving back and forth as you suggested. The inside is a complete oily mess!  At this point, I have a few questions:
1.) The wires seem unsafe to me and I believe I should replace them. The picture I have attached shows a junction which looks like a conductive strap which connects the top and bottom wires. I believe (and hope) the conductive strap tying the top and bottom wires together  is mounted on a non-conductive base. This seems like a shock hazard. Could I bypass this with wiring that ran from the bottom to the top? OR do o need to keep this configuration and cover the exposed wires with a non-conductive cover?

2.) The lower bearing seems fine to me and did have some oil (although it still made noise). I believe after looking at these parts that oil entering from the top "oil add" hole should be added when the fan is off allowing the oil to run down between the shaft and upper bushing into the lower bearing. I do not see any other passage for the oil from top to bottom to travel. Is there a reason the lower bearing isn't just loaded with grease? I can do this with oil but since there is no way of knowing how much is in the lower chamber I would be just guessing what the correct amount would be for operation. How do you know the oil added is getting to the lower bearing ?

3.) I was planning on cleaning up the oily mess with paint thinner. Is this ok?

Thank you 

Tom 

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 Posted: Wed Aug 15th, 2018 08:08 am
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Levi Mevis
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Tom, those wire terminals that you are talking about are attached to a piece of mica board which is an insulation material, there's no chance of getting shocked by the fan unless you touch the individual screw terminals themselves then you might get a shocking surprise but as far as the whole fan goes, its completely insulated from electrical current. 

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