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AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Graybar/R&M Sawtooth ceiling fan Disassembly

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Graybar/R&M Sawtooth ceiling fan Disassembly  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Jan 9th, 2019 03:53 pm
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Pat Murphy
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I have about got this thing cleaned up - so now I see more that needs attention. Hopefully someone else as stripped one of these all the way down?

My question concerns the upper left portion of this photo, the shaft that the blue taped wires protrude from. I can't tell if that piece is removable. From the very top of the fan I can access and remove a round slotted nut, that appears to come off of the top end of that middle shaft. (There was an identical slotted nut at the lower end of the shaft, pictured at the lower right of the photo.) However, with the top nut off, the shaft does not budge. It is likely stuck together with ancient gunk. But, I haven't tried a pipe wrench on the shaft yet.

The big questions are: Is the shaft removable; Is the shaft threaded into the top housing (with conventional direction threads?

The reason I want to remove it is to be sure any and all oil ways are clear. I see a slot opening (I assume for oil) at the upper end of the shaft where it enters the underside of the top casting. When shooting compressed air into the outside oiling port on top of the casting, I assumed the gunk would shoot out the slot I mentioned for channeling oil into the bearings housing. It did not. That is my reason for trying to remove the shaft to see what I am missing.

Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Pat

Last edited on Wed Jan 9th, 2019 03:54 pm by Pat Murphy

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 Posted: Wed Jan 9th, 2019 05:22 pm
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Stan Adams
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Don't try to take the shaft out, they are nearly impossible to get out.
There should not be any oil passages in the shaft, they are all in the rotor.
Generally the only time you have to remove the shaft is if it is badly worn, seldom if ever is unless it is a 1930s GE, then you can bet it will be worn.

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 Posted: Wed Jan 9th, 2019 08:26 pm
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Pat Murphy
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Thank you Stan!

Oh, but I was so proud of making a tool that fit that round slotted nut perfectly. I guess I'll use it when reassembling at the bottom of the shaft. But that also brings up another issue... what I found inside, that i've seen refereed to as a crush washer, or a copper fiber washer/gasket. I've not found them available except by the 100s. Any ideas on where to look for singles? Also, any idea of how much to torque them? The old one is horribly smashed and appears to have been out of center enough to tilt the rotor a bit. (OD 1" x ID 3/4" x 2~3mm thick best I can tell)

Thanks for the mention on the oil distribution. Now I see the port at the top of the rotor as well as the spiral grove through the center. Still a little fuzzy of finding the oil path through to the inside of the top casting though. I'll study that closer when I get back to it. Maybe a few more p.s.i of air will reveal it.

Thanks Again!
Pat

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 Posted: Thu Feb 21st, 2019 03:58 pm
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Pat Murphy
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Stan Adams wrote: There should not be any oil passages in the shaft, they are all in the rotor.

Well, it is running again! Time to give it the proper dose of oil :-)

Yes, Stan, I see how the oil movement works in the rotor, once the oil gets that far, but I am still missing something. I don't see how/where the oil passes through the top casting, via the top exterior oil port, to be able to end up in the top of the rotor so that it can trickle down into the bearing cup. Seems like the oil passage should be pretty obvious viewed from the inside of the top casting.

I am to the point of running the fan, which it does work well. Adding oil in the top oil port flows back out after just adding a small amount. There's no way it could be getting all the way to the bearings to do proper lubrication.

Question: do you know if it's straight shot from the top oil opening, through the top casting, to the top of the rotor? So far I've not been able to poke a piece of wire through.

Thanks,
Pat

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 Posted: Thu Feb 21st, 2019 04:57 pm
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Stan Adams
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It sounds like that top oil port is stopped up. Try blowing compressed air through it or try running a wire through it.

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