AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Rod Rogers, Larry Hancock
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Best metal fill  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 01:56 am
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Robert Winter
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Oct 7th, 2014
Location: Austin
Status: 
Offline
Hello all-
I am finishing the last part of an old R&M ceiling fan, and have run into an issue where the previous owner drilled a larger hole that must be filled and retapped for the proper sized screw. What is the best filler you have used that would harden enough to be properly tapped to correct threads, but be rock solid?

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 03:22 am
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_azEsNkA9Q&vl=en

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 03:42 am
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Aaron Hardy
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018
Location: Tuscola, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
I'll second Russ' suggestion, but JB Weld will work in a pinch as well. I've used it that way a couple of times successfully.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 09:56 am
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
David Allen
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 6th, 2017
Location: Northport, Alabama, USA
Status: 
Offline
Robert Winter wrote: Hello all-

I am finishing the last part of an old R&M ceiling fan, and have run into an issue where the previous owner drilled a larger hole that must be filled and retapped for the proper sized screw. What is the best filler you have used that would harden enough to be properly tapped to correct threads, but be rock solid?

'

Hi Robert.  I'll second Russ's recommendation for a Heli-Coil insert. Those are very effective and provide a permanent repair.  The only qualification is, the hole must be drilled to the correct size for the Heli-Coil.  If the original owner damaged the hole too badly, it may already be too oversized for the Heli-Coil to work. In that case, a different repair process would be needed.

There is no filler or epoxy which will have the shear strength of the parent metal of the casting. Unless the screw is purely decorative, you will not have a sound repair by filling the hole with glue and then trying to drill and tap it.  If the hole is too oversized for a repair insert; and it needs to be able to take a fully tightened screw - the casting will need to have a braze repair. The bronze filler metal will allow drilling, tapping, and having a fastener tightened into it fully.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 03:16 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Edward Kowalke
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Thu Aug 27th, 2015
Location: West Michigan, Michigan USA
Status: 
Offline
you could drill and tap for a larger screw and insert with an epoxy (pretty much the same idea as a heli-coil) then drill and tap to the desired size.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 11:40 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Aaron Hardy
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018
Location: Tuscola, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
Edward Kowalke wrote: you could drill and tap for a larger screw and insert with an epoxy (pretty much the same idea as a heli-coil) then drill and tap to the desired size.
This (Edward's) is the way I've used JB Weld successfully, although I put a little oil on the bolt threads, coated with the JB Weld, inserted into the hole and allowed to set. Once the weld has set, you can back the screw out. David is right; the weld will not have the strength of the original casting, *if* there are no existing threads for the weld to grip. Heli-coils are a good option, but I hear the kit can be pricey for an occasional repair. I talked with my neighbor who does some manufacturing, and he suggested Keenserts. It looks like McMaster Carr carries them: https://www.mcmaster.com/key-locking-threaded-insert. They do require an installation tool, but it may be cheaper than a Heli-coil kit. Anyway, you need to tap the existing hole (if it's not already), then purchase the appropriate Keensert. Works well to repair damaged threads much like the Heli-coil, but I believe you would need to drill and re-tap with either product if you wanted to use the original screw.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Feb 12th, 2019 11:56 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyCTh23Z6o0

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed Feb 13th, 2019 12:35 am
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Aaron Hardy
AFCA Member


Joined: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018
Location: Tuscola, Texas USA
Status: 
Offline
Aaron Hardy liked "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyCTh23Z6o0"

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Feb 13th, 2019 02:12 am
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Russ Huber
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Southwest, Wisconsin USA
Status: 
Offline
Robert Winter wrote:  What is the best filler you have used that would harden enough to be properly tapped to correct threads, but be rock solid?

The epoxy fills are not rock solid. 

Last edited on Wed Feb 13th, 2019 02:15 am by Russ Huber

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed Feb 13th, 2019 02:59 am
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Robert Winter
AFCA Member


Joined: Tue Oct 7th, 2014
Location: Austin
Status: 
Offline
Thanks to all for your input. I have tried the metal fills (JB and others) but they simply don’t hold up in this application. I did get the Heli-coils which are great, but there was too much damage. I think the only possible solution at this point (short of finding another oil cup which is highly unlikely), is to follow David’s advice and have someone do a braze repair. I appreciate all the input from everyone on this!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

Current time is 09:32 am  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Best metal fill Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1653 seconds (16% database + 84% PHP). 29 queries executed.