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Taking on my first rebuild - Could use some guidance  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Mar 13th, 2019 05:03 pm
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Chris Pare
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 Sorry for the long post for a new member, I have been stalking the board for over a year and finally pulled the trigger on my first fan.
  • Most importantly, I know this is a GE Loop handle, but I am not sure the model and hoping someone can offer more history for me as I start the process it would be greatly appreciated.
  • Though the seller insisted the fan ran at the time they sold it, I am not going to plug it in with the current wiring mess, I purchased a rebuild kit from Vintage Wire & Supply to rewire the unit.
  • Based on prior threads, I plan to use the Lucas Red "n" Tacky #2 in the oscillator gearbox, if anyone has had a bad experience with this lithium based product separating let me know.
  • On other units it appears the gearbox is easily accessible by unscrewing the brass fitting on the top, and removing the screws - this one appears to have a pin in the brass fitting - will I need a punch to remove it, and a new pin to ensure a tight fit?
  • This unit has been repainted at least once, but they didn't remove the plates - now they are all gloss black - any guidance on if this can be recovered?  Do I need to remove the plate and replace the rivets?  I am not planning for a complete media bast & buffed blades rebuild, I want to respect it's age and character, but being able to read the plate would be a nice improvement if it's easily accomplished.
  • Anything other experience you can offer woudl be greatly appreciated - thanks in advance!
Lots more pictures here
https://ibb.co/D14Rmyg
https://ibb.co/dbwvX4M
https://ibb.co/0hnC2vz
https://ibb.co/fdJJBLM
https://ibb.co/C79Z85J
https://ibb.co/12pqCHt
https://ibb.co/f9nGgzB
https://ibb.co/B6Y502g
https://ibb.co/qBRJv17
https://ibb.co/YBgH2TP
https://ibb.co/n03rzyZ
https://ibb.co/58X5N2f
https://ibb.co/zHYjVTj
https://ibb.co/xh3fkyZ
https://ibb.co/C6CF1HB
https://ibb.co/RP1SLSy

Attached Image (viewed 304 times):

IMG_20190210_091917_01.jpg

Last edited on Wed Mar 13th, 2019 05:07 pm by Chris Pare

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 Posted: Wed Mar 13th, 2019 11:23 pm
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Lane Shirey
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I would suggest first to use the search feature of the forum to try to find your answers first.  Essentially you’re asking how to restore a fan.  That’s a lot to ask.  

After you use the search feature to try to find out as much as you can, if you still have questions, then for sure, pose them to the forum.  


I would have to say that the majority of your questions have been answered many times in past posts.  

Good luck on your restoration. 

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 12:59 am
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Bob Peshoff
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Chris....looked at all your pictures and from what I can tell, it looks like you have a GE 75423 12" 2 star fan.  There should be a motor tag on it that will have this information on it and also a Form and Type.  These would be helpful in determining what you actually have.  They are good reliable fans when serviced.  Try using some lacquer thinner on a rag to wipe off your tags to better read the info on them.

Like Lane said, once you have that information you can find a ton of information on wiring, painting, servicing, etc. 

Your fan looks to be in decent shape and would look pretty good with a cleaning and polishing.  Red and Tacky works well in the gearbox and many on here use that on all of their fans.  Getting the wiring in shape is the first order of business that I can see. 

Good luck and if you have any questions check back and I'm sure someone will be happy to help you in your endeavor...great bunch of gals and guys on here that are always willing to help.

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 12:59 am by Bob Peshoff

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:13 am
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Chris Pare
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Thanks

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:14 am by Chris Pare

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:18 am
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Bob Peshoff
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You shouldn't have to remove the pin from the knob on the gearbox.  Take both screws out and the turn the knob counter clockwise until the top comes off.  Taking the knob off isn't necessary.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:21 am
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Chris Pare
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Thanks so much for this information, it's extremely helpful and exactly what I was hoping to get from the experience of members on this forum.  Hopefully I can use the information you provided to find out how to access the oscillator gearbox (that's my next search).  I will pick up some lacquer thinner tomorrow and post back what I find, if all goes well I hope to have this mini project completed this weekend.   :D
As i mentioned I really love the patina on this fan, and don't want to change anything, just fix the electrical and hit it with some new grease, oil, and wick - if the lacquer thinner brings the plates back to a readable level that will be a nice bonus.

Thanks for the very helpful reply - I could certainly see this being a hobby I could keep myself busy with....

Last edited on Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:22 am by Chris Pare

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:26 am
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Don Tener
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Just use some paint stripper on the motor tag. Can you read the From number? With that you can tell about the year it was made. Just from looking at it I am going to guess Form S and that would be 1916 2 star. But that is just a guess.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 01:35 am
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Steve Stephens
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Your fan would probably be a Form S, T, or V1 made 1916 to 1919.   Is the blade brass or just looks like brass?  Does a magnet stick to it?

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 02:07 am
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Chris Pare
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I was able to scratch the motor tag clean with my fingernail, I just needed some encouragement.
MO: 1200222
CAT: 75423
Type: A0

Magnet does stick to the blades

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 03:08 am
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Don Tener
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Chris Pare wrote: I was able to scratch the motor tag clean with my fingernail, I just needed some encouragement.
MO: 1200222
CAT: 75423
Type: A0

Magnet does stick to the blades
What is the Form number. That is how GE dated these fans. With it being a Type AO I am still guessing it is a Form S1 or S5 but the "S" is the important part of that. Form R  is possible also, That would be 1915.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 04:55 am
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Steve Stephens
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Chris Pare wrote: I was able to scratch the motor tag clean with my fingernail, I just needed some encouragement.
MO: 1200222
CAT: 75423
Type: A0

Magnet does stick to the blades
Keep scratching with your fingernail to look for the FORM letter on the motor tag.   The letter will be an S, T or V.  During the WW1 period GE changed from a lot of brass to more steel; a steel cage replacing the brass cage, a brass plated or painted STEEL blade replacing the former brass blade (with some exceptions).   There were other changes also but I don't know them all.   There is a "look" to the steel blades of this period and your fans' blades have that look so is why I asked if a magnet stuck to the blade.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 09:08 pm
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Chris Pare
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Steve Stephens wrote: Chris Pare wrote: I was able to scratch the motor tag clean with my fingernail, I just needed some encouragement.
MO: 1200222
CAT: 75423
Type: A0

Magnet does stick to the blades
Keep scratching with your fingernail to look for the FORM letter on the motor tag.   The letter will be an S, T or V.  During the WW1 period GE changed from a lot of brass to more steel; a steel cage replacing the brass cage, a brass plated or painted STEEL blade replacing the former brass blade (with some exceptions).   There were other changes also but I don't know them all.   There is a "look" to the steel blades of this period and your fans' blades have that look so is why I asked if a magnet stuck to the blade.


Form is an S1 - The WW1 link to steel makes perfect sense - thanks for sharing!

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 Posted: Thu Mar 14th, 2019 11:19 pm
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Jim Humphrey
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Chris,

I don't know your background in basic mechanics and electrical knowledge, but here are just some comments and thoughts:


- Get a notebook and make copious notes and drawings as you disassemble things.  Take detailed pictures as things come apart, especially gearboxes and speed controls and anything that can be put together in more than one way and still look right.  Write down the resistance readings you measure.


-Organize the parts you remove.  Cupcake baking tins are great.  I like to put things into the organizer in the sequence they come off, but whatever you can come up with, keep it organized.


-Figure things out yourself.  If it isn't obvious how something disassembles, work on it until you figure it out, and don't force things to the point you break the whole mess.  You can always get on the website here and ask for advice, but only after you make a valiant attempt and can't figure it out.  You'll learn a lot more that'll apply to your next fan and the next one and so on.


-What looks obvious and you don't need notes suddenly looks unfamiliar when you leave the project for two weeks and then return.


-Get a good multimeter for electrical measurements.


-You don't have to have professional tools for most things.  You'll use the same two or three screwdrivers for almost everything anyway.


-And just have fun with these old fans, they're a lot more forgiving of mistreatment and learning errors than most of today's junk.






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 Posted: Tue Mar 19th, 2019 02:29 am
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Chris Pare
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Thank you all for the assistance over the last few days, I wanted to circle back and let you know the rewire / refurb went well and I am now the very happy owner of a fan with a beautiful airplane hum...


There were a few lessons learned along the way and I would be happy to share those with anyone interested - I also want to recognize Steve Stephens for his post explaining the wiring diagram for my fan - I would have been lost without it as most of the wires were old and broken.  The only change I had to make was to move the speed control (#1) to the first screw as my fan progression was Off/High/Medium/Low.


Without a doubt the most harrowing moment is removing the stator, exposing the wires and attaching them to the new wiring.  I was highly concerned that I would damage the stator while removing / reinstalling it, or break off the delicate wires while trying to re-attach them.  It's a shame the stator doesn't have thumbscrew posts to attach the head wire - everything else seems to be built to last forever.  


The fan now has new wires, fresh wick & oil, and new grease in the gearbox that flows really well.  I will likely pop the cover off the gearbox and check the wick in a few days to see if has significant discoloration (expected) if so I will perform another change.


Attaching a link to the fan running, while it's not the brass bladed fan I hoped for, knowing it's WWI link and the time period it comes for makes it even better.  Perhaps in a decade when it needs its next service I will do a full media blast, powder coat, and blade buffing - but for now I am in love with the patina on this beauty!


Thanks again for help with my first rebuild, I am going to go on the hunt for another this weekend!
Chris


https://youtu.be/DXe8V9T6rvU

Last edited on Tue Mar 19th, 2019 02:35 am by Chris Pare

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 Posted: Tue Mar 19th, 2019 02:40 am
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Don Tener
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Great that you got it running. I knew it was a form S. That puts it to 1916. Nice fan!

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 Posted: Mon Mar 25th, 2019 02:41 pm
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Rusty Anderson
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Chris,We have some things in common.  My first fan restoration is a GE 75423 and I needed a lot of advice.  I tried not to ask the kind of questions that must have been answered many times but when one is new at this everything seemed special to me.  Many answers are found in the “How To” section but it isn’t listed on the home page.  It is found under F.A.Q.s.  Members with skill and knowledge have taken the time to post excellent instructions for many of the problems I was faced with.  Also, the youtube videos on GE fan restoration were helpful.
It was the kind response to my questions and the helpful attitude of the members that prompted me to join.  The membership packet that was sent after joining is also terrific.  In just my short time as a member I’ve communicated with several members.  I’m now on my second fan and enjoying it a lot.  Hope you have fun with yours.
Rusty

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