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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 05:28 am
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Gordon Martin
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Hi all, long time lurker first time poster. Just picked up this weird little guy from eBay, can't find much about it. I'm wondering if Ritter General Electric has anything to do with the American company, maybe a licensed design? Also according to the label it runs off 32 volts which seems pretty unusual, anyone know what this might have been used for?

The biggest issue i'm having so far is trying to get the blades off. The motor shaft is a fair bit longer than the blades, and is quite rusty from age. Trying to slide the blades off over this surface rust is proving near impossible even with copious amounts of wd40. And I can't really clean off the rust since the cage is in the way, and the blades have to be removed before the cage can come free. Any advice on how I can do this without damaging anything? 

Cheers









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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 05:57 am
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Levi Mevis
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If its 32 Volts it could of been made to work with a Delco Generator (which is basically a 32 Volt DC farm generator that was used on rurual farms in America during the early 20th Century which may or may not of been licensed for use in other countries around the world as well including Australia).
More than likely that fan does have ties with the American GE Company (more than likely the "Ritter" on the fan was the Lisencing/Marketing firm for General Electric in Melbourne, Australia, and the fan probably dates to the 1920s or so.

As for getting the blades off, I'm having a similar issue with the blade assembly on a late 1940s Westinghouse LivelyAire Fan that I can't seem to get the setscrew to come loose no matter how hard I try. The funny thing is that the fan isn't rusted or anything, it acts almost like the paint on the setscrew and blade assembly wasn't completely dry when they put everything together and the paint set the rest of the way and then made the setscrew get stuck in place.

Hope this helps.

Levi


 

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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 07:43 am
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Gordon Martin
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Levi Mevis wrote: If its 32 Volts it could of been made to work with a Delco Generator (which is basically a 32 Volt DC farm generator that was used on rurual farms in America during the early 20th Century which may or may not of been licensed for use in other countries around the world as well including Australia).
More than likely that fan does have ties with the American GE Company (more than likely the "Ritter" on the fan was the Lisencing/Marketing firm for General Electric in Melbourne, Australia, and the fan probably dates to the 1920s or so. 
Ahh, didn't think of usage with a generator based power system, that could well be it. At first I thought it might have been a fan for the inside of a bus or caravan but they're usually 12 or 24v and this fan doesn't have any kind of mounting holes in the baseplate, only the remnants of some rubber feet. I think i'm going to try leaving the blades and shaft soaking in WD40 overnight and see if that helps, don't really want to force it too much more.

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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 04:43 pm
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Joel Schmid
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Hey Gordon,Try this -
Take a piece of 600 grit sandpaper and cut off a 2 inch wide long strip of it.
Wrap the sandy side around the shaft in front of the blades and pinch gently with fingers.
Spin the blade with other hand.
This will lightly grind the rust off the end of shaft.
Keep going until you see clean metal on shaft.
Now hit it with a fresh shot of wd 40 and the blade should come right off.

Last edited on Fri Mar 15th, 2019 04:44 pm by Joel Schmid

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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 04:57 pm
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Don Tener
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If you have a dremel tool with a wire wheel that works great to clean the shaft in front of the blade. It also does less damage to the shaft than sandpaper does. I personally use a Dumore hand grinder (It is a Dremel on steroids) But they are expensive at about $350 each.  A regular dremel will work just fine.

Last edited on Fri Mar 15th, 2019 04:58 pm by Don Tener

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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 07:40 pm
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Jim Kovar
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Any Ritter connection?   :wondering:




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 Posted: Fri Mar 15th, 2019 09:19 pm
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Steve Sherwood
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Ritter manufactured dental equipment at one time. Probably from the early 1900's until the 1970's in America. They sold products world wide back in there prime. There are still some products that carry the Ritter name, but the actual company is long gone. A company named Midmark uses the Ritter name on some of there products, like I said Ritter does not exist, only in name on a few products made today.

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 Posted: Sat Mar 16th, 2019 03:17 am
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Gordon Martin
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Don Tener wrote: If you have a dremel tool with a wire wheel that works great to clean the shaft in front of the blade. It also does less damage to the shaft than sandpaper does. I personally use a Dumore hand grinder (It is a Dremel on steroids) But they are expensive at about $350 each.  A regular dremel will work just fine.
I did try a dremel with a wire wheel but the cage is stopping me from being able to align the dremel with the shaft properly. I may try sandpaper or steel wool and see if I can hold it in place with pliers while turning the blades.

UPDATE: Still no luck, the end of the motor shaft is actually pretty smooth, looks rusty but I think it may just be discoloured? Either way, those blades do not want to go anywhere. Not keen to use any more force either as I think i've managed to slightly warp the front of the motor housing now...grr. Anything more potent than WD40 that might help here?

Last edited on Sat Mar 16th, 2019 05:45 am by Gordon Martin

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 Posted: Sat Mar 16th, 2019 10:05 am
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Jan Hendriks
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Hi Gordan,
               a link here on Aussie power trivia ...


wind or diesel, charging battery's' 

http://members.iinet.net.au/~cool386/plug/plug.html





Over the years ive come across 32 volt from most of the manufacturers , either here from the likes of  Australian own fan companies such as  Elcon, Mac, Hulme ,MAK etc etc.. also from imports such as  Ge ,GEC, MARELLI ,etc
 
I Like the 32 volt as not so "common"...no products were imported or made after 1960 with this voltage 
even though, in the out back Queensland they were still using 32 volt much later  ,...I once bought a elcon [ 1950s model] that was still in use in 1980 on a farm  

some examples from my small collection …………………...
Ge 32  USA


smiley face ...
Once apon a time I painted fans ….no japan on this one  :down:
notice the socket that would of screwed in to the over head lamp /light fitting




GEC   32...UK




MARELLI.....
 32 volts


Marelli in green is running of a HP printer 32 v DC power pak



i could post numerous  pics , but think thats enough eh.. :D

The company Ritter ,from memory with  a conversation with Jim Dunn yrs ago was originally German 
your fan s base design is close to other German fans I've seen ..with so many files on this computer I carn at the moment find the fan it reminds me of...when I come across it ill post eh
nice fan you have  by the way  congrats .. :cool: :cool:

Well that's a bit of info for ya mate .. .hope you got your blade off too
cheer jan

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 Posted: Sat Mar 16th, 2019 01:50 pm
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Gordon Martin
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Jan Hendriks wrote:

The company Ritter ,from memory with  a conversation with Jim Dunn yrs ago was originally German 
your fan s base design is close to other German fans I've seen ..with so many files on this computer I carn at the moment find the fan it reminds me of...when I come across it ill post eh
nice fan you have  by the way  congrats .. :cool: :cool:

Well that's a bit of info for ya mate .. .hope you got your blade off too
cheer jan

Very interesting! Might need to take a look at some of the german fans then. The voltage for rural houses makes total sense too, I figured it would be something along those lines. I have a 30v power brick somewhere that should be goo enough to run this fan. If i can get this dang blade off that is... cheers

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 Posted: Thu Mar 21st, 2019 02:34 pm
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Gordon Martin
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Well, I gave up trying to remove the blade, wouldn't move no matter what I tried and I didn't want to damage anything. So I cut the 4 welds holding the cage on so I could get to the blades, should be able to solder it back together easily enough. After dremeling most of the old paint off the blades I noticed they were actually brass, so i'm considering just polishing them up and leaving them brass rather than repainting them the original yucky yellow colour. 
I did have a question about polishing the brass though...There are some spots where the paint had flaked off and corroded the blades (you can see in the photo where this happened). I've gone over one of the blades with steel wool and brasso, and its starting to get a nice shine to it. However, there are still dark spots where the corrosion was that seem to go deeper than what I can polish out. But the blade feels nice and smooth to the touch. Am I just not polishing hard enough or is the finish permanently damaged? Also what's the best way to get rid of the last of the paint from around the rivets that hold each blade to the hub?

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