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Stator removal GEC British fan 1930s  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Tue May 7th, 2019 07:04 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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The cable to the static windings of this excellent and unusual

induction-motor fan is completely perished but I'm at a loss as to how to remove the stator and 4 x windings from inside the cast-iron casing so that I can replace the cable...? It seems to have been pressed in place when the fan was manufactured. Any hints or tips on removal? I've already tried heating it up in the oven to see if that would help but no go, and I don't want to break the cast-iron casing trying to force it out..... Steve

Last edited on Tue May 7th, 2019 07:05 pm by Steve Sidaway

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 Posted: Tue May 7th, 2019 07:27 pm
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Chad Hunter
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Not sure about that fan but if there is a badge on the housing the rivets will need to be removed first, then try the PVC pipe trick.

https://www.afcaforum.com/view_topic.php?id=22032&forum_id=1&highlight=hammer+trick

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 Posted: Tue May 7th, 2019 09:24 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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Hi Chad... No badge on the housing, and the big problem is that only one end of the motor housing is removable, so the pipe trick can't be used. The other end of the motor housing is part of the casting.....

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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 01:15 am
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John Smalley
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Kevin Braswell made this to take a stator out. Works well 



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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 06:49 am
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Steve Sidaway
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Hi - same problem I'm afraid - only one end of the motor housing can be removed, so I can't use a jig or a pipe. The only access to the stator from the other end is through the three equally spaced narrow vent slots, and that would have to be a narrow blade screwdriver or similar, at an angle....

 

Last edited on Wed May 8th, 2019 06:50 am by Steve Sidaway

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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 10:16 am
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Lane Shirey
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Place the housing/stator over the open jaws of a bench vice.  Open the vice fully then close the jaws to they catch the housing, but not the stator. 


Then use a drift punch that will fit through  the screw holes that hold the stator in place.  Being careful not to hit a coil with the punch,  go through the hole, and seat the punch on the stator lamination hit the punch once or twice with a hammer. Then go to the opposite hole and keep alternating back and forth. 

I place the tip of the punch just to the side of the mounting holes in the stator. Be exceedingly careful to direct the punch so if it slips it won’t hit a coil.  Be sure the punch is located properly before every hammer strike. 


The stator will “walk” out of the housing a little bit at a time.  


I hope that helps. 

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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 10:19 am
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Lane Shirey
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However if your headwire connections are on the open end of the motor as yours appears to be there’s no need to remove the stator.  If it passes through the stator and terminates on the backside, then you’ll need to remove it. 

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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 10:58 am
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Steve Sidaway
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Hi Lane and thank you. I dribbled som Plus-Gas down the edges of the stator and left it overnight to help to free it from any rust. I then did exactly what you said this morning and it's coming out...very slowly! I don't have any drift punches but found an ancient and pretty useless chisel with a narrow tip and have ground that down either side so that it's thinner than before and doesn't foul the rear holes. So it's now a question of positioning, tapping, turning round...etc...Steve:up:

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 Posted: Wed May 8th, 2019 10:59 am
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Steve Sidaway
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Forgot to say - the headwire connections are on the inaccessible side of the stator, so yes, it DOES have to come out - worse luck!

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 10:26 am
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Steve Sidaway
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OK, well it's now out successfully but the one of the 'daisy-chain' connections to one of the stator windings has detached itself and so one winding is O/C. I CANNOT (even with an additional magnifying glass on top of the bench magnifier) find the broken end, but have located an outer winding that (scraping off some enamel) gives me the same resistance reading as the other windings when connected... So a slight bodge will be necessary..! I've now got an area about half inch by inch of exposed (although enamelled) windings. This won't be visible from outside when the motor is re-assembled, but I'm wondering what others would use in a case like this to re-insulate the exposed windings....?

Last edited on Mon May 13th, 2019 10:28 am by Steve Sidaway

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 11:12 am
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Chad Hunter
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https://www.mcmaster.com/electrical-insulating-varnish

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 12:32 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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I'm in the UK so we don't get that product over here but point taken, and I'll look for similar. I was actually wondering if there was anything on the market that would be something like the wrapping that was originally used on the windings...?

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 01:02 pm
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Chad Hunter
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Friction Tape & Black is all I have ever found.

Attached Image (viewed 173 times):

53846791-ACA2-42B3-8035-16BBA0A0796A.jpeg

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 03:13 pm
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David Hoatson
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Liquid electrical tape can be used to insulate a spot where tape would fall off. 

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 03:53 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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Thanks - will check it out to see if we have that over here.... :D

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 Posted: Mon May 13th, 2019 03:53 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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Will try and locate - thanks

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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:36 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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OK chaps - thought you might like to see the end result now that it is finished. With a tool made from an old ground-down wood chisel, I drifted the motor stator out of the steel case. The motor coils were o/c, but I managed to find the break (luckily it was on an outer winding), and repaired it, then fitted a new flex from the motor to the speed control in the base. Then I had to get the motor back into its casing - bit of a task as it would originally have been pressed in by machinery when manufactured. I used a small cylindrical sanding pad to clean the inside of the motor case and the outside of the motor itself, then tapped it back into place. Lubricated it, then re-assembled, fitting

a new mains flex and plug, and it works really well, either an Arctic blast or a gentle zephyr....:D :D

Last edited on Sun May 19th, 2019 01:50 pm by Steve Sidaway

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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:37 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:38 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:38 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:40 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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Last edited on Sun May 19th, 2019 01:41 pm by Steve Sidaway

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 Posted: Sun May 19th, 2019 01:47 pm
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Steve Sidaway
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Thanks for all the helpful suggestions from people on here. In the end, because the area of insulation that had to be covered on the windings was quite small, I actually put a blob of Araldite Rapid on it - secured the winding, and insulated the solder join quite effectively - it can't be seen from outside. The original-looking flex from the motor to the base is modern repro (probably about thirty years!) cotton-covered rubber cable in the current UK domestic flex wiring colours of brown and blue. As I'll probably pass this on at some stage the main flex is three-core black PVC sheathed, with a modern UK 1-amp fused plug. My other old fans are all suitably wired with old flex and VERY old two-pin 5-amp Brit plugs pre WW2...! :D

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