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Cleaning and Oiling Vornado Bearings  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Sun Aug 11th, 2019 10:19 pm
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Anthony Shelton
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Picked up a B24C1 this week and tore it all down, cleaned it, and put a new wire on it. Gonna have to work on that dent.
High speed works great, slow not so much.

Took it all apart and "prelubed" the bearings directly. Put it back together and it worked great last night on slow.

Today it's back to slower speed and it kinda changes speed over time.

I don't recall seeing wicking material inside the caps. Saw a spring and a bunch of black gunk in that area. Also tubes seem to have a slight crimp on the inside of the motor. Is this normal to prevent big debris from getting in? 

What is a good way to clean these bearings to get all the bad stuff out. Tips? Anyone have pictures? 

Thanks!




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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 01:25 am
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Lane Shirey
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There’s a felt donut in each motor end housing.  The problem is that the old oil is sticky and just adding new oil rejuvenates it and makes it stickier.  This causes the motor to run slow, generally until they warm up. 

The only effective way I found is to use CRC Lectra Clean to saturate the wick by spraying it into the fill tube until it runs out. Then blow it out with compressed air. Repeat at least 3 times then let it evaporate for a few days.  


Every other one I’ve restored not using this method runs slow until they warm up.  

Best of luck with it!

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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 03:38 am
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Anthony Shelton
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Lane Shirey wrote: There’s a felt donut in each motor end housing.  The problem is that the old oil is sticky and just adding new oil rejuvenates it and makes it stickier.  This causes the motor to run slow, generally until they warm up. 

The only effective way I found is to use CRC Lectra Clean to saturate the wick by spraying it into the fill tube until it runs out. Then blow it out with compressed air. Repeat at least 3 times then let it evaporate for a few days.  


Every other one I’ve restored not using this method runs slow until they warm up.  

Best of luck with it!
Thanks for the response Lane. I'll open her back up in the next couple of days and try cleaning it again. Again I don't recall a wicking donut (at least in the back half). I kept the stator in the front cap so I didn't look to much into it, but now I think I'll take the stator out to get a closer look. 
It does just like you said, runs slow until warmed up. 

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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 10:15 am
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Lane Shirey
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You won’t be able to see the donut, except sometimes you can see the felt if you look carefully around the bearing. It’s behind a sealed, riveted plate on the inside of the motor housing.  Some have removed this plate, but I wouldnt suggest doing that.  
  You just hose it down with the cleaner then blow it out with compressed air and repeat until the cleaner coming out looks clean.  You may use a whole can on one fan.  By the way, the cleaner I mentioned won’t hurt the stator or the paint (most likely) . Most other solvents will. 

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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 02:42 pm
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Aaron Hardy
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I’ve had good luck with CRC Bråkleen (and even Autozone brake cleaner) myself when cleaning old oil and grease off wicks and other fan parts. The Lectra clean is >2x the price of Bråkleen and harder to find in my area. 
I remove the motor and blast the parts over a bucket or pan. That way I can see the color of the discharging solvent and I can collect the stuff to let it evaporate when finished. Both Bråkleen and Lectra Clean come with a straw, so you can direct the solvent right where you need it, but, like Lane said, neither will harm the stator or paint (although I take no chances when it comes to the paint). 

Last edited on Tue Aug 13th, 2019 02:44 pm by Aaron Hardy

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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 09:19 pm
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Lane Shirey
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They’re both the mostly same active chemical. I used to sell CRC. Generally their electrical products have a non explosive propellant because electricians work on live equipment. Also sometimes the chemicals are less toxic because electricians often work in confined spaces. I’m not sure that’s true in this case. 

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 Posted: Tue Aug 13th, 2019 11:17 pm
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Aaron Hardy
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Lane Shirey wrote: They’re both the mostly same active chemical. I used to sell CRC. Generally their electrical products have a non explosive propellant because electricians work on live equipment. Also sometimes the chemicals are less toxic because electricians often work in confined spaces. I’m not sure that’s true in this case. That makes sense, though. Both work really well at removing grease and neither leave a residue. I can see where the flammable propellant would be a concern. However, I never worked on electrical circuits in the military or civilian field without de-energizing either. 

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 Posted: Thu Aug 15th, 2019 01:30 pm
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Anthony Shelton
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Well I got it apart again last night and used a full 19 oz can of CRC Lectra-Motive on it. Pulsing it directly around the bearing and also through the fill tube. Used compress air to try it.

Fired the fan up and it ran smooth and normal speed. Let it sit for about 12 hours overnight and tried it this morning and it seems to get right up to speed.

I'm using Holden's Zoom Spout oil (which is 76 Turbine Oil 32). Looks like it's close to SAE 10/15. Is this ok or should I do a full switch to 3in1 SAE 20?

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 Posted: Thu Aug 15th, 2019 02:21 pm
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Aaron Hardy
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Zoom Spout is one of the preferred oils in the forum, although I'm not familiar with Holden's. Supco manufactures the name brand Zoom Spout I'm familiar with. Nonetheless, it's a high quality lubricant that should work fine. I use the 3-in-1 you mention, but the viscosity difference seems rather negligible.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 20th, 2019 08:04 pm
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Richard Daugird
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I'll agree, most collectors use Zom Spout, or the 3-in-1 blue bottle, not the red.

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 Posted: Tue Aug 20th, 2019 08:05 pm
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Richard Daugird
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I have a double Vornado window fan(actually two) that runs just like yours, I'll try this.

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