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Mike Strozier
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Well, seems I have developed a problem.  Originally picked up a 1940's ArticAire, then later a 50's or 60's Bersted Zero (restored this one for my wife) and now a Westinghouse Whirlwind.  Seems once you pick up one fan you just can't stop  :D  Photo's included.   The unit is extremely rusted, dirt etc and seller stated it wouldn't run.   I took the motor case off, checked the oil wicks (they are shot, needs replacing) but I supplied a little oil to the front and rear.  Cleared out all the dirt, put it all back together (without the cage as it needs quite a bit of work due to several dents where the fan blades doesn't clear the cage).  Long story short, it runs :)  
So I've now taken the fan completely apart except having problems with the fan motor assembly.  I've tried gently tapping a screw driver on opposite sides to work it out and nothing.  Wanted to make sure I'm not missing something.   As I would like to get the motor completely removed from it's casing so that I further clean it up and just easier to work with.

Thanks for any suggestions as it's all a learning curve for me being new to this.
















Alex Rushing
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Those stamped steel Westy motor cases are notoriously hard to get the stator out of. Search for stamped Westinghouse stator removal and there are several methods members have used to do it. None are easy. Good luck getting it out!

Mike Strozier
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Thanks, I'll do some research on your suggestion.  It may come down to just doing the best I can as it is :D  And tape everything else up if I end up having to sand it by hand and/or with a dremel.  Would be painfully slow but only alternative I see.
The fan blades have been a real pain so far but making progress.  I'm not a professional nor have a full garage of tools to work with.  So been doing everything by hand and using a dremel.   Discovering after some cleanup and removing the paint some brass or bronze parts that needs a bit of polishing.  And the fan blade is coming out pretty nice.  Tested with a small portion of it and I may continue cleaning, buffing / polishing it up instead of painting it like it as it is.

Current results

Here the Oil wick was painted. 



After some clean up:



I still need to polish up the wing nut.  And going to leave them as is, and some clear coat so seal them?  As I like this accent look much better than the original black paint.

And the fan blades:



Instead of repainting I'm going to clean up the rest.  It's just painfully slow going :D

Last edited on Wed Oct 2nd, 2019 05:39 pm by Mike Strozier

Mike Strozier
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Ok...yeah thanks for the tip Alex. I found some posts on the removal and I'll be skipping that part :D I'll tape up everything best I can and sand it down. I see it's no easy task getting the stator out.

Alex Rushing
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You're certainly welcome, Mike!
Taping off the inside is definitely easier than getting the stator out. I have been diligently avoiding a situation requiring a Stamped Westy stator removal. On the one Westy I've messed with, I used compressed air to get the big dirt out, and a bent paint brush to get more out. Then I doused the coils in the back with enough insulation varnish to soak into the coils. Wiped the excess insulation varnish off the inside of the stator and motor case.
If the fan gods are smiling, there will be enough wire to solder to coming out of the motor case. I solder and heat shrink, then carefully stuff the repaired part inside the motor case. Tedious at best.

David A Cherry
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 I have restored lots of these fans.. although you may want to take the stater out...there is no need,just leave it... you're opening up a bag of worms...

Mike Strozier
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Thanks all. Yup leaving the stator in. I do have another question. These compression springs in the oil cap, where can I get a replacement? When replacing the wick, one of the springs bent/stretched and for the life of me can't get it back in place so that it fits properly in the oil cap. Just my luck :hammer:

Alex Rushing
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I have done the same with a wick spring. Took some patience, but used high quality needle nose pliers on my Leatherman Charge to gently "roll" the spring tighter at the base, and then pinched the small part tight around the wick. Worked like a champ. :)

Steve Stephens
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Alex Rushing wrote: (I) used high quality needle nose pliers on my Leatherman Charge to gently "roll" the spring tighter at the base, and then pinched the small part tight around the wick. Worked like a champ. :)I'd think twice about crimping or pinching the wick spring to the wick as you or someone will want to remove the wick in the future.   I've had a number of fans where the wick spring had been squeezed against the wick making it impossible to remove the wick.   As I see it, the wick will not and probably cannot, move within the spring.   Hopefully the spring coil will grab the wick enough to hold it in place.   I've used two pair of needle nose pliers to carefully bend or unbend the old spring as needed and that has worked well.

Mike Strozier
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Steve Stephens wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: (I) used high quality needle nose pliers on my Leatherman Charge to gently "roll" the spring tighter at the base, and then pinched the small part tight around the wick. Worked like a champ. :)I'd think twice about crimping or pinching the wick spring to the wick as you or someone will want to remove the wick in the future.   I've had a number of fans where the wick spring had been squeezed against the wick making it impossible to remove the wick.   As I see it, the wick will not and probably cannot, move within the spring.   Hopefully the spring coil will grab the wick enough to hold it in place.   I've used two pair of needle nose pliers to carefully bend or unbend the old spring as needed and that has worked well.

That is the problem I am having.  The springs are squeezed into the wick and couldn't get the old wick to move.  Had to cut the wick into parts so that I could slide them out.  And the upper portion of the spring went through the wick.  I'll keep tinkering with it to try and get it straight 

Steve Stephens
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The wick springs as they came from the factory must have had enough tightness holding the wick that the wick did not move.  I find I have to "unscrew" the wick to remove and to screw it back in usually in the opposite direction to replace.  You should not be able to pull the wick straight through the spring.

Mike Strozier
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Funny how this goes.  All the rust, sanding, polishing, fixing the bents in the cage so that the fan blades move freely, rewiring etc and yet what seems to be the most simplest part...oil wicks causes the most issues :D
The old wick



And now after trying to replace them :D




I think the bottom one will be ok.  The top one well....may or may not.  Going to try and continue to align the other rings but getting closer.

If I can't get the first one corrected, is there any potential issues using a spring from a typical standard ink pen?  I noticed those springs are about the same in size as these. Just they are not copper or bronze.


Here is a pic, any issues you guys can think of by using this instead?



Last edited on Fri Oct 4th, 2019 07:38 pm by Mike Strozier

Alex Rushing
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Looks good with the ink pen spring!
Maybe just flare the base of the spring out to center it in the cup?

Mike Strozier
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Alex Rushing wrote: Looks good with the ink pen spring!
Maybe just flare the base of the spring out to center it in the cup?

Yup it fits in the oil cup perfectly.  Nice work around :)  I have plenty of pens without ink lol that I haven't thrown away.  Good thing, recycle the springs.

Mike Strozier
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Coming along nicely.  Waiting for all of the parts to finish curing before putting it all back together.  I didn't fill any pits etc in the metal where all the rust did most of the damage.  I wanted to leave that aged feel or battle scars so to speak of the fans past.  I cleared it out best I could with a 24hr soak in rush remover, followed by dremel /wire wheel to clean up much of it, followed by sanding and then priming etc.  Once finally prepped, 3 coats of Universal Black Gloss from Rust-Oleum paint and 2 coats of clear.  All rattle cans :D



Last edited on Wed Oct 9th, 2019 03:47 pm by Mike Strozier

Mike Strozier
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Just a hard time reattaching the motor housing to the base. Darn washers go inside the unit and my fingers are way to big to try and hold them in place inside, while shoving the motor down and then running a bolt through it lol.

*edit*

Well I managed to get one of the washers in.  Couldn't fit the other.  Not exactly sure how the Manf was able to fit them in originally.  It's holding the motor upright just fine though.  Had to do some touch-up paint as it scratched the heck out of it.  I may end up putting a washer on the butterfly nut at some point if it doesn't remain sturdy enough.   I'm keeping this fan for myself, not reselling so over all I'm good with it.

Last edited on Wed Oct 9th, 2019 09:11 pm by Mike Strozier

Alex Rushing
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Glad you got it going, Mike! :)
Any finished photos?

I did take a photo of the wick in my Westy G.
Photo of Westy G wick spring.

Mike Strozier
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Hopefully I'll have it put back together this weekend. Just wanted to make sure all of the paint was fully dried / harden before I finish assembly. I'll post up the finished photos this weekend :)

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Well back to the drawing board. Since most of the parts been drying for a week figured why not. Rust-Oleum universal gloss black looks good, and even with several coats of clear nope. So easy to scratch and paint to peel. Either going to have to buff some of it out and then touch up paint to correct :( 2nd issue, somehow a section of the cage warped. As putting it together nothing lined up. However on trial run when it was down to bare metal it worked great. Got to figure that one out. 3rd issue. Motor housing I didn't notice this before until I fully put it all together, it must be raised a hair. As when I have it full together, you can't turn the fan at all. Loosen it up some and works great. Another thing I need to figure out. And 4th, darn screw that holds the fan blade in place, head snapped off. So now only way to take the fan blade back off, need to drill out the remaining part and find a small screw as a replacement. Fun. Oh the lessons lol.

So I may end up stripping everything back down to bare metal. Drill out the broken screw holding the fan in place. Lightly hammer the motor housing into it's assembly. As it feels like it's just a mm or 2 out to far.

Put it all together, and fix the cage in the process so everything comes together without it having to be forced. Then repaint again.

But I probably will not use this Rust-oleum. The last fan I restored was a 1950's Zero 1250r and I used Krylon spray paint on it. And it remained durable, no scratches or anything. And only took 2 days on it.

Alex Rushing
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Mike,I sure hope you can get the Westy figured out! They are a bear to say the least. Seems Westinghouse thought it would be hilarious to make fans we'd have trouble fixing 100 years later. Haha


Here is an imgur gallery with photos of my Westy progress. Worked on this one backwards from usual, as I restored the parts as I took them off(then tried them on to make sure the repairs didn't mess with the fit). Just have the motor and base left.
Westy G Oscillator Project



As far as Rustoleum goes, the only one I have ever used I liked was the "advanced formula" gloss paints. They are designed for outdoor furniture, and work great without primer on a very clean surface.
I hate to admit, but a couple of my fans I did not clear coat. After a week, the advanced formula dries strong with a smooth deep luster(for rattle can paint anyway). Key is surface prep though. I sand to bare metal, but leave old paint in the pits to act as a filler. The advanced formula is designed to seal the surface from rust(as any good outdoor furniture paint would), but with excellent coverage and look. I do wait a week in warm beforeh though. If it isn't warm in my shop, I place the parts in my laundry room.


I have not tried Krylon gloss paints, as I am turned off with Krylon after the Krylon  lacquer on my GE AOU began crackling a few weeks ago. Now I need to take the brass off and strip it for a new clear coat. :cry:
Though, it may be user error on mypart, not sure yet.

Mike Strozier
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Very nice! Looking through your photos, love the shine on the fan blades!  I'm still learning on that aspect of it.  I picked up two additional fans off ebay.  Both look to be 50s or 60s.  With one of them probably won't be able to do much as the attachment from the base to the motor housing is broken & missing.  The seller had it held in place only by a screw.  The other one is a Eskimo but the buttons / plates are faded out.  I'm probably going to use the broken one to test with.  As I really want to get better shines out of the fan blades.  They look great.

As for the Westy I'll get back on it next week.  I have some left handed drill bits that should be able to pull the broken screw right out.  Then try to track down a replacement.  As for the paint, going to strip it down back to bare metal.  Either the paint isn't reacting well to the metal or I did something wrong somewhere.  I'll get it sorted :)


This weekend I'll look at the motor a little more.  Since I'm not worried about it's current paint job lol I'll put it in a vice and try to 'gently' hammer the stator into it's assembly.  As with the motor assembly fully buttoned up, it locks the rotor.  Can't turn it at all as it ends up scrubbing against the back plate somehow.  It's probably something simple.


That's usually it, always the simple things that get over looked.  I work mainly in IT and it is like that with my job as well lol.  Fun times.

Lane Shirey
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Mike Strozier wrote: Steve Stephens wrote: Alex Rushing wrote: (I) used high quality needle nose pliers on my Leatherman Charge to gently "roll" the spring tighter at the base, and then pinched the small part tight around the wick. Worked like a champ. :)I'd think twice about crimping or pinching the wick spring to the wick as you or someone will want to remove the wick in the future.   I've had a number of fans where the wick spring had been squeezed against the wick making it impossible to remove the wick.   As I see it, the wick will not and probably cannot, move within the spring.   Hopefully the spring coil will grab the wick enough to hold it in place.   I've used two pair of needle nose pliers to carefully bend or unbend the old spring as needed and that has worked well.

That is the problem I am having.  The springs are squeezed into the wick and couldn't get the old wick to move.  Had to cut the wick into parts so that I could slide them out.  And the upper portion of the spring went through the wick.  I'll keep tinkering with it to try and get it straight 
When the springs are crimped onto the wick, first slice the wick into thin slices using a razor blade then poke them out. Then use a needle nose pliers to stick it in where the wick was and squeeze the exact part of the spring that is kinked.. it should straighten back to the round shape.  You might need to squeeze it pretty hard.  

Some wicks fit loose and will simply push the wick back into the spring when you install it.   There’s also the thought that on fans where the wick touches the spinning rotor shaft, that the motion could cause the wick to “unscrew” back into the spring where it’s no longer touching the shaft.  This is why they were crimped. 


On my restorations, I always straighten/ recrimp the springs as they were from the factory.  



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