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Mobilaire Restoration  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Jan 8th, 2020 08:59 pm
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John Spina
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Newbie here, new to fan restoration.

I started out with a floor fan that's been in my family since new.  Four blade Westinghouse. I have used it constantly over the years, and it just got uglier and uglier. So I decided to restore it.

Disassembled and sent the parts for powder coating - Commercial Gray for the housing and stand, Bright Silver Metallic for the grilles. Kept the original green mounting gasket.

The motor ran, but was noisy. I disassembled it and found the winding insulation was in very poor shape. The wire insulation was also cracked and disintegrating. I tried my best to piece it back together, but all it did was hum. Tried replacing the start capacitor, no luck. It would spin without the blade, but just hum with it installed.

Went on a search to find a replacement motor...no luck...so I gutted it and installed a Broan ventilator motor into the housing. It took some fairly complex modification to fit it into the original motor housing, but it worked. The new motor has a 5/16" flatted shaft where the original shaft measured 0.311". Oddball. So I machined the original shaft bore to accommodate a 3/8" sleeve and the new motor shaft. Wen together beautifully and works incredibly quiet now. Fun project even though the original motor guts were removed.

Attached Image (viewed 190 times):

westinghoush-mobilaire-restored.jpg

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 Posted: Wed Jan 8th, 2020 09:09 pm
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Josh Gierut
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Good job!  Looks awesome, yeah some of the late Westinghouse motors weren’t the best.  Especially the hexagon shaped motors.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 03:24 am
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Steven P Dempsey
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Yes - I had 2 that burned out, westy roll-abouts

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 03:26 am
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Steven P Dempsey
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And after a full disassembly & paint, the crap westy motor smokes out

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 03:27 am
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Steven P Dempsey
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staying with Emersons, R&Ms

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 01:16 pm
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John Spina
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Here's the motor I used to restore the fan. Since it was a CW motor, I removed the end caps and reversed the armature. Now it's CCW and I was able to retrofit it into the original motor case. The shaft needed a special sleeve to adapt to the fan blade, and the fan was located in the exact same place as original.

I was also able to use the low speed resistor in the circuit and the 2 way switch to control the speed.

Smooth as silk, and much quieter than the aging original motor.

Attached Image (viewed 140 times):

broan.jpg

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 02:22 pm
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Steven P Dempsey
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I might try that, they are cool looking & otherwize it is fully restored

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 09:10 pm
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Richard Daugird
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How did you strip the paint for powdercoating, and did you have a hard time re-installing the rear grille? I have several of these that need restoration, including one with a smoked motor.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 09:30 pm
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John Spina
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Paint was removed by bead blasting.

The motor was gutted and the front half (towards the blade) was machined out to accommodate the new motor. Two holes were added and two locknuts retained the mounting studs of the new motor. I had to pop the motor open and reverse the front and back plates to make it run CCW. Then I had to drill and ream the fan shaft bore to 3/8 in.

I added a bronze sleeve, 5/16" ID 3/8" OD and drilled a clearance hole on the side of the sleeve to allow the set screw thru to contact the flat on the motor shaft. The result was that the blade fit perfectly to the smaller diameter motor shaft. As a side note, you might want to use a "patch lock" socket head set screw, 1/4-28 x 3/8" as a stronger way to secure the blade to the shaft (as opposed to the original slotted set screw).

Relocated the 5uF motor start capacitor to the metal can below the motor (I really didn't have to do that as there was enough clearance in the rear of the motor to fit it in the original motor shell), but did it anyway. Also, cut off the ac plug and extended the wiring from the new motor to the metal can.

Using the 3 ohm series resistor mounted on the motor mount frame, I was able to run a low speed along with a high speed on the 3 way switch.

To re-install the rear grille, I basically pressed it into a "bowl" shape which made the overall outside diameter a bit smaller. Worked it into the shell groove and once it was completely within the groove, flattened the shape to increase the OD and fit tightly into the groove....if that makes any sense.

Both grilles were powder coated so they grew just a bit, but fitment was really no problem.

The motor I used is available on Ebay and thru appliance parts supply houses.

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 10:04 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Wow, you put in a lot of effort, very impressive, especially for a first timer! Take some progress pics on your next project and post them for us!

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 Posted: Thu Jan 9th, 2020 10:29 pm
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John Spina
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Richard Daugird wrote: How did you strip the paint for powdercoating, and did you have a hard time re-installing the rear grille? I have several of these that need restoration, including one with a smoked motor.

Seems to me, as long as the motor shell is still intact, you can fit a smaller motor inside it. Remove the two bronze bushings, and hog out the front bearing mount and support gussets. The motor I used had two 10-32 mounting studs which I relocated to the front, just behind the fan blade. Two drilled holes, two lock nuts and it is securely mounted. It *just* fits with a some Dremel contouring on the inside.  That replacement motor has ball bearings and runs smooth and very quiet. Appears to have plenty of power to drive the blade, although it's designed to run a 10 inch vent fan. It's power consumption is roughly equal to the original Westinghouse motor.

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