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General Emerson - Two Recent Restorations Completed  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 05:40 am
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Alex Rushing
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The Emerson - Mostly preserved Japan finish with some noticeable touch-ups, painted gearbox, and such.Lawrence Smith helped out with getting the cage and switch! Cage needed a load of solder/filing work, but Lawrence threw it in with the switch, an extra base, and a 29668 motor(future project). Badge came from a previous resto I used a Coleman badge on.
I had always wanted a six blade brass wing BIG MOTOR Emerson, so this fit the bill nicely and wasn't outrageously expensive. Certainly worth more than the money invested(not counting labor).Unfortunately when reinstalling the motor tag, I pinned it back on upside down(even after doing multiple Emmy restos with tag work..LOL) - but this one took the pipe trick to get the stator out, and I would be nervous to try and get it out again for a tag reversal. 


Fan cost(with shipping) - $192
Parts(with shipping) - $170
Wire, felt, plug, etc - $25


Total money = $387


Hours invested in repairs, touch-ups, mechanical/electrical restoration, etc = 25hrs


Emerson 27666 - Circa 1919:


Before:






After:






Video of Emerson running:




The General Electric - 
This began from me putting a thread up needing parts to complete a 1920 Whiz. Well, the parts were going to be $100+shipping. Heck no, not for a flip switch and loop.
Found a 1917 GE 9" AO V1 on eBay for $165 shipped - needing some parts(only $65 more than the two parts for a Whiz).
The 1917 had a steel war-time blade(which is put away in case the fan ever needs to be sold(hopefully not), so the brass Whiz blade was used, being a 9" also. The motor cover on the AO was missing the oscillator disc and arm, so I used the cover from the Whiz, which had a brass disc and steel arm - though slightly different configuration than the AO had(again, I am keeping the spare parts just in case). The 1917 AO had steel screws as well, so I used the brass screws from the Whiz on it. The AO cage had a missing steel wire, so I used the Whiz cage, which was excellent. Just swapped the badges.
The drivetrain was trashed in the Whiz, so I swapped over the drivetrain from the AO gearbox to the Whiz put on the AO. The bearing carrier, while may have sufficed, was just crappy looking, so I invested in a brass one from Whiteglovesfans. It was a beautiful and effective addition - making the cage mounting and everything more secure as well.


Anyway, enough blabbing - Just had to vent as this was the most expensive little fan I've messed with, and definitely not worth what I invested(I think)..LOL


Fan cost(the AO) shipped - $165
Whiz parts fan shipped - $84.40
Solid brass bearing carrier shipped - $48
Wire, felt, plug, paint, etc - $30


Total money - $327.40


Hours invested in complete cosmetic/mechanical/electrical restoration, etc = 25hrs


GE(Circa 1917) Two-Speed AO V1 9" Oscillator:


Before:






After:






Video of GE running:







Now for the Resto-photos!
Photos partially out of order, but us fan guys can handle that! :)




Emerson:









With Lawrence cage attached










































Yup - I put the motor tag back on upside down - and since it took 20 minutes and the pipe trick to get the stator out, it'll have to stay that way. haha






















































After:























General Electric:
































































After:





















Thanks for looking, y'all! And please be looking for more fan restos in the future! I don't discriminate when it comes to fan brands! :hammer:

Last edited on Thu Mar 26th, 2020 05:46 am by Alex Rushing

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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 02:30 pm
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Sean Campbell
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Two more fans saved! That Emerson is very cool! I love my 14666 and was definitely thinking about getting this one, but passed. Seeing this kinda makes me regret that! XD In all seriousness though, you did great on it (better than I would have). The GE is probably worth more how you rebuilt it in my opinion. How do you polish your blades if you don’t mind me asking?

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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 05:39 pm
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Richard Daugird
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Thanks for showing all the in-process pics, a lot of folks don't realize what goesinto one of these projects. Can you go into a little detail on pinning the Emerson I.D. plate?

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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 07:33 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Sean Campbell wrote: Two more fans saved! That Emerson is very cool! I love my 14666 and was definitely thinking about getting this one, but passed. Seeing this kinda makes me regret that! XD In all seriousness though, you did great on it (better than I would have). The GE is probably worth more how you rebuilt it in my opinion. How do you polish your blades if you don’t mind me asking?
Many thanks Sean! :)
A 14666 sounds awesome! I was just glad to find a 6 blade Big motor Emmy for a reasonable price. The packing wasn't good, bit it made it just like it was photographed, so can't complain.

The polishing; the little GE blades were done as usual. Main polish on 8" medium cut cotton wheel and fine compound to finish. Before the main polish, I use little cotton wheels on my rotary tool to polish around the spiders and  rivets.The main Polishing hides the small wheel polish signs.

The Emerson was atypical, as it couldn't be polished using the main edge of my wheel. So I put the compound on the side of the polishing wheel.
Itwas difficult, but some patience helped get through it.Samerotary wheel for the spider, and then a main polish using the side edge of the 8" wheel.
Apologies for the typos and stuff. Trying to reply on mobile is almost impossible.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 07:39 pm
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Alex Rushing
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Richard Daugird wrote: Thanks for showing all the in-process pics, a lot of folks don't realize what goesinto one of these projects. Can you go into a little detail on pinning the Emerson I.D. plate?
You're certainly welcome, Richard! :)
And thank you for the kind words!

I plan on doing a video of the plate process. I have some spare Emmy motors laying around I could demo the steps on as well. The big motor was much easier than the smaller motors. I use a brass hammer to knock my pins back over, so if I strike the shaft, it won't leave a mark like a regular hammer might(though still not likely to hurt the hardened shaft).

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 Posted: Thu Mar 26th, 2020 07:58 pm
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David Kilnapp
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Wow, first class all around. Great job on the Emerson blade (nice black spider) and on the motor tag and badge painting. That takes a ton of patience and work to get it right.  I bet you enjoyed bringing those fans back to life. Too bad the fun's over at that point! Lovely work, really super!

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 Posted: Fri Mar 27th, 2020 02:39 am
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Alex Rushing
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David Kilnapp wrote: Wow, first class all around. Great job on the Emerson blade (nice black spider) and on the motor tag and badge painting. That takes a ton of patience and work to get it right.  I bet you enjoyed bringing those fans back to life. Too bad the fun's over at that point! Lovely work, really super!
Many thanks for the kind words, David! :)

Indeed, the blade polishing was arduous, but well worth it! I use a paint marker for the spider, and clean up paint that gets on the brass before it dries. Makes for a nice look for sure.

Ever since getting into tag resto, it has definitely cut the costs of these restos a lot. While I love Donald Coleman's work, it does add to the expense notably. I opted not to paint resto the GE badges, because I wanted lots of brass showing on it. I call it "Tiny Bling". Haha

Hopefully soon I'll have an R&M six blader to restore! I have no R&M fans, so that will be a neat example to have, since it is an earlier stamped motor version. :)

Last edited on Fri Mar 27th, 2020 02:42 am by Alex Rushing

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