AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Made Rite? Help identifying / repairing

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Stan Adams, Rod Rogers
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Made Rite? Help identifying / repairing  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:15 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Mike Kara
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Sep 13th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Hello all, 
I stumbled across a fan in an antique store that fascinated me, so I bought it.  Not that I know anything about them, it just looked beautiful.   

I plugged it in when I got home and it doesn’t seem to spin very fast or move a lot of air.    I’m not sure if this is by design or the need for maintenance.   

Can someone help me first identify what I have from photos and secondly, advise on how/where to oil or clean to improve operation?   

Any help is appreciated.   






Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:33 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Dave McManaman
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Apr 22nd, 2017
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline


Not sure how slow we’re talking. If just somewhat slower than what you’ll expect it probably is a bit gunked up. Hair and all sorts of stuff gets pulled into and wrapped around the rotor/shaft. Does the blade spin freely when off?  Short of taking it apart and cleaning, I’d start with oiling the front and rear ports. Use a light sewing machine oil. Such as zoom spout. You can see the hole atop the rear part of the shaft. May be just dry. My made rite spins very fast so for it to be slow is notable. May want to open it up if oiling doesn’t rectify it. As far as pushing air, the pitch on the blades may be pretty flat.

Last edited on Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:45 pm by Dave McManaman

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:37 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Mike Kara
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Sep 13th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
It’s quite slow and slows down further if I tilt the face to be parallel with the floor.   Blade also seems to be out of alignment. (Bent?)
How would I oil this?   The holes on front/back of casing?

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:39 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Dave McManaman
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Apr 22nd, 2017
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline
I just edited my response with a pic of where you oil and what I use to oil with. Should be a port in front too. As far as running slower when tilted forward, when off does the blade/shaft move forward and backward much?  If much more than 1/16”, could be a spacing issue on the front/ back of the rotor causing it to rub. Or bearings worn. 

Last edited on Sun Sep 13th, 2020 10:42 pm by Dave McManaman

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Sep 14th, 2020 12:47 pm
  PMQuoteReply
5th Post
Mike Kara
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Sep 13th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Thank you Dave for the advice.    I picked up some 3in1 Blue this morning and gave it a shot of oil.    It did help get it to spin faster, but I think it may require opening.

When the fan face is pointing upward, it slows down quite a bit.    There seems to be some play in the shaft.

Do you by chance know of any videos/pics that may guide me a bit on opening this / cleaning / adjustment?  


Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Mon Sep 14th, 2020 05:44 pm
  PMQuoteReply
6th Post
Dave McManaman
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Apr 22nd, 2017
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline
Here's a Made Rite I took apart a few years ago, documenting the rotor removal and the fiber washers/spring that's on the shaft fore and aft to keep it centered in the windings (stator) field.  I don't know of other fans that have a spring like this, everything else i've worked on has merely had the fiber washers.  Anyway, when you open the case you may find some of the washers come off the shaft and remain up against the bearing on either end.  So you'll want to make sure you get all of them and keep track of how many are on the front and how many are on the back of the rotor.  That'll be your starting point for the correct amount.  Sometimes, they'll be broken or otherwise, worn.  You can clean up any gunk that's gotten wound around the shaft or up into the bearing area.  There may be quite a bit, hair, dirt, hardened oils, etc.  Once good and clean, you can look at adjusting/replacing the fiber washers.  You can pick up replacements online.  From there, it's really a combination trial and error till you get it to where it spins smoothly when you fire it up.  But, again, start with the same number fore and aft as what you find when you open it and then, from there, maybe add one from one end while subtracting from the other side.  Hopefully, that's all it is.  If that doesn't fix it, then i think you're looking at bearing wear which, for this fan, may be the end of it as far as investing more time/money - absent some sentimental value.  I hope that helps.





Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Sep 14th, 2020 06:37 pm
  PMQuoteReply
7th Post
Mike Kara
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Sep 13th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Thank you, the pictures are very helpful.  

I haven't opened the fan yet, but going on your response I fired up the Googlebox to check on fiber washers.    I did see results for Home Depot and the like - will these work? 

Also, I assume the point of the washers is to minimize/eliminate shaft play, correct?


After the oiling, it pushes some air now and seems to spin nicely when the face is pointing towards the floor, but still slows down quite a bit when pointing the face towards the ceiling.     I also get a little noise when it's perpendicular to the floor.  

Finally, it does sound like a little bearing noise going on but nothing too concerning.  

Thanks for working with me on this.    It doesn't have much sentimental value beyond it being a new (old) shiny I found and bought myself for my birthday this past weekend.



Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Mon Sep 14th, 2020 08:17 pm
  PMQuoteReply
8th Post
Dave McManaman
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Apr 22nd, 2017
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline
Yes, the fiber washers are for spacing to keep it from too much movement front to back. And also to keep it centered in the field. Outside the field it won’t spin as it should and can lock up on you. Check the inside/outside dimension on the washer. They’re in all sizes. Don’t know what size yours are.  Hopefully, spacing on washers will fix it. 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Mon Sep 14th, 2020 08:25 pm
  PMQuoteReply
9th Post
Noah Britt
AFCA Member


Joined: Sun May 26th, 2019
Location: South Carolina USA
Status: 
Offline
I've bought fiber washers from Home Depot. Just make sure you get the right size. In my experience, Home Depot doesn't have a great assortment of fiber washers; sometimes they have the right size, sometimes they don't.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2020 10:56 am
  PMQuoteReply
10th Post
Mike Kara
Guest
 

Joined: Sun Sep 13th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Well, I spent the evening tearing down the fan.
Upon opening, I found the inside was surprisingly clean.  No hair, not much dust, but the shaft was a bit gummy.    It only had one washer on the front side and I found no evidence of rotted remains of any other washers.  

I cleaned the heck out of the shaft and got it as shiny as I could.   The bearings that held the shaft seemed to be the worst of it.    I was able to clean most of the gunk and gave them a lot of oil while working it in.   It seemed the inner races of the bearings were designed to pivot slightly and after the oil and manipulation, they seemed to smooth out and move a bit freer.   Also, around the bearings there seemed to be some kind of felt thing pressed in.    I assume this is an oil wick of some sort, as that seems to be where the oil ports line up.    Both of those got a healthy drenching of 3in1 from both the bottom and the top sides.  

While cleaning, the tiny wires attached poorly to the crappy lamp cord detached.  I took this as an opportunity to replace the badly chewed up lamp cord with a Menards cloth wrapped special. (I’m not going for collector’s grade restoration here).    Soldering it to those teensy wires wasn’t easy, but I think i got it stable.  

While the blade was out, I slightly bent the blades to be closer aligned.   Visually it looked pretty good when I was done.

Upon reassembly, I attached the fan blade a little further down on the shaft than what it was when I received it.

I crossed my fingers and plugged it in.

Holy cow this thing blows some air!!   👍👍👍


This little endeavor has me intrigued and interested in some of the other antique fans I’ve seen while trying to educate myself on my little impulse buy.   I may have a new hobby budding.  

Thank you very much for your guidance Dave!

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2020 11:54 am
  PMQuoteReply
11th Post
Dave McManaman
AFCA Member


Joined: Sat Apr 22nd, 2017
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska USA
Status: 
Offline
Excellent news!  Sounds like you did a great job bringing this one back to full performance. Watch out, these things tend to get addictive and, before you know it, multiply. 😂 

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

Current time is 11:00 am  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Made Rite? Help identifying / repairing Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1789 seconds (21% database + 79% PHP). 28 queries executed.