AFCA Forums Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

 Moderated by: Steve Cunningham, Stan Adams, Rod Rogers
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Emerson Seagull restoration  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2020 03:39 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
Keith Sturgeon
Guest
 

Joined: Mon Sep 14th, 2020
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
I have a 100% functional and complete Emerson Seagull- oscillating version.

Lots of surface rust in places, but not so much on the base, and certainly not so much that it doesn't work; you can still see chrome on the "seagull" on top, and the knob in the center of the blades.

I want to restore this, as I love the processes and learning, but if I'm being honest (and I know no other way) I don't want to keep it. 

I def want to sell it so I can move on to the next fun project...

Can anyone offer some solid advice on the process? Will It devalue it? I'm not currently planning to re-paint or anything, just clean it up, free what I can of rust/grime, see where we are.

It may be more grime than rust for that matter.

Come to understand that this could be a somewhat "special" fan to a collector, so I also don't want to good it all up.

Help anyone? Advice? want Pictures? Should I sell it as is, and move on to another play project?

It does work- it's so cool to plug something in so old, and watch it just do it's thing.... they just don't make stuff like they used too!

K

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2020 07:38 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Robert Todd
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Sun Nov 27th, 2005
Location:  
Status: 
Offline
Keith,


Inclusion of pictures is always helpful, but may not be necessary to answer your questions.  My personal opinion is that you are approaching this in just the right way.  That is a cool fan, but, unfortunately, not terribly valuable.  I believe you would only want to restore this if you intended to keep it as restoration costs can quickly drive the cost above it's potential value.  Cleaning the fan and ensuring it's functionality offers good value for the next potential buyer.  The fact that it is grimy is frequently a good thing as the grime often protects the finish from rust and ravages of age.  So, clean it, oil it and make sure it works properly and hopefully, you will realize a satisfactory return on your investment to help fund your next venture.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

 Posted: Wed Sep 16th, 2020 09:33 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
Steve Sherwood
AFCA Member


Joined: Mon Nov 14th, 2005
Location: Peculiar, Missouri USA
Status: 
Offline
Getting the motor will not be easy on that fan. A seagull fan in good condition might bring $75 or so. Hardly worth the effort to restore it. If you want to work on fans I would look for cast iron fans. Stamped steel fans can be difficult to work on.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply  

 Posted: Thu Sep 17th, 2020 12:08 am
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Patrick Ray
AFCA Member
 

Joined: Sun Feb 12th, 2017
Location: USA
Status: 
Offline
I have a Seagull that I fully restored. Mine was pretty rough though. I go by an 80% rule: if there's that much of the original finish remaining, clean it up and call it patina. If it's less than that, it's a candidate for a resto. I've looked on ePay and the value on these have been going up. Been seeing mid $100 range for the oscillating ones.

Back To Top PMQuoteReply

Current time is 06:23 am  
AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Pre-1950 (Antique) > Emerson Seagull restoration Top



Beige Theme By: Di @ UltraBB
UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1497 seconds (14% database + 86% PHP). 26 queries executed.