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Death of the China Fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Oct 1st, 2020 11:24 pm
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Noah Britt
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This China fan was unfixable, (as they usually are).


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 Posted: Fri Oct 9th, 2020 02:02 am
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Frank McCormack
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Those cheap chinese fans are built right on the edge of failure to be cheap.  They bury a thermal fuse in the windings that will kill the fan if they get above a certain temperature, its a good idea for fire prevention, but it kills the lifetime of these fans.  I have tried to replace that thermal fuse, you can find them on places like Digikey.  But you have to be really careful that the wiring doesn't come out and get all mixed up like it did to me.  So I failed on that attempt and bailed.  I would recommend if you dive into this to hold the wires in place first with some liquid electrical tape and you might be successful.  Good luck!

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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 12:12 am
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Noah Britt
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Thanks a ton for your advice!! I let the fan catch fire for a little while, so the badge started to catch fire and melt, and I think some paint on the cage might've come off, but other than that nothing really got damaged in the fire. I was thinking about throwing the fan in a bonfire and really letting it burn to the ground, but decided against that because I wanted to keep some of the fan parts for fans needing parts in the future. After hearing your advice, I'm really glad I didn't go the total decimation route.

Last time I opened the fan up, I looked for a thermal fuse but couldn't find one because I wasn't expecting it to be in the windings of the motor. This time when I opened it up again, I looked closely for signs of the thermal fuse in the windings, and I spied part of the fuse sticking out under one of the windings. I cut the waxed string off, (I kind of scraped some insulating varnish off some wires while I was at it) and dug the thermal fuse out. I clipped it and tested it with my multimeter, and sure enough, it was toast! By the way, I'll (hopefully) fix the scraped off wire insulation with some Sprayon insulating varnish.

So here I come to my dilemma. Should I buy another thermal fuse, wait a few months for it to arrive from China, stick it in and wait a month for that fuse to go bad? Or, alternatively, should I connect the wires without a thermal fuse and hope the fan doesn't catch fire and burn the shed down? What are y'all's thoughts?


Thanks!

Noah

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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 01:50 am
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Don Tener
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I would go without the fuse. Put it somewhere safe and let it run for a few days. If nothing happens don't worry about it. If it burns up throw it in the trash and get something better.

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 Posted: Sat Oct 10th, 2020 02:26 am
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Noah Britt
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Ok, thanks. I'm working on the project now. I actually pulled this fan off the side of the road, and people usually trash a fan just because it is gummed up, or has a bad cord or something minor like that. With this in mind, I thought I could just get myself a nice crummy shop fan with a little work.







Last edited on Sun Oct 11th, 2020 12:30 am by Noah Britt

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 Posted: Sun Oct 11th, 2020 12:39 am
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Noah Britt
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The fan arose from the dead! I repaired the damage, cleaned and lubed the fan, and it works great. Thanks so much for the tip on the thermal fuse!!

The repair is at the bottom of the picture; see the white string.





I think I've got myself a new shop fan (if it survives the durability test). I'll fell better running this than an antique fan out in the 100's° summer weather. 

Come to think of it, I've got a dead Galaxy box fan that I was unable to fix. Maybe it could use some similar treatment...

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 Posted: Mon Oct 12th, 2020 12:40 am
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Frank McCormack
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Noah, congrats on finding that thermal fuse, they dont make it easy, but buried in the windings is a good place to protect the fan.  You can get those fuses same week online from digikey.  It will take some ciphering to decode the temperature setpoint.  Hopefully the fire was before those pix (grin).

Instead of going through that hassle, just spend a couple more bucks over the cost of a thermal fuse and add a standard fuse (I would use a slow blow 2A in this case).  If you get to melt down that will shut if off too. I do that with all of my fans, typically I use a 4A slow blow. 

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