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Restoring my first fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Thu Apr 1st, 2021 09:16 pm
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Dustin Lee
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The fan is a Signal 122400 from 1955. It ran before disassembly.


Body - I plan on sandblasting the body pieces.
  • Concerns:
    • Front ... bearing? 
      • If this is a bearing, the inner race is immobile currently - and I can't access it?
      • How do I protect it during sandblasting.
      • How might I fix/unstick it if it is a bearing?



    • Oscillator:
      • Armature
        • Can I soak this is a solvent cleaner? + Then re-lube

      • Gearbox: Clean old grease
        • Plan of refilling with Royal Purple per the lube advice.
    • Stator
      • What's the recommended method for cleaning these?

      • Replace cord from motor to base.
    • Shaft
      • Clean and sand lightly
    • Switch and Speed control
      • Re-solder or replace wires from switch to resistor.
      • Replace power cord.
      • How do I clean this up?



  • Switch
    • How do I remove this so I can paint and save the label?



I want to thank anyone who took the time to read this! I'm looking forward to this project immensely and hope to learn a lot.


[size="3" style=""] - Dustin

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 12:54 am
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Malcolm MacGregor
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Your asking a mouthful!  On the speed switch knob, the center white dot is pressed in place. I have had to use a small drill bit, very small, and drill slowly until it spins off. You can then access the small screw that holds the knob in place. That little white dot will most likely be on the drill bit. Remove it and don’t loose it ( easy to loose)You can sand the white dot and patch it with bondo or even spackling compound, then paint it. 

That’s a starting point. Hopefully people with more talents than myself will chime in to give you good advice!
Good luck,  Malcolm 

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 02:00 am
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Noah Britt
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Yes, that is a bearing. It is not a ball bearing, however, so there are no inner and outer races. I think they're called sleeve bearings, so it works just by utilizing the smooth surfaces of the bearing and the shaft with oil in between.

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 02:20 am
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Dustin Lee
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Malcolm MacGregor wrote: Your asking a mouthful!  On the speed switch knob, the center white dot is pressed in place. I have had to use a small drill bit, very small, and drill slowly until it spins off. You can then access the small screw that holds the knob in place. That little white dot will most likely be on the drill bit. Remove it and don’t loose it ( easy to loose)You can sand the white dot and patch it with bondo or even spackling compound, then paint it. 

Thank you!
I realize now this was a lot to ask.

I was organizing my thoughts and To-Dos and it all kind of wound up of laundry list of "Oh boy I don't know how to this" 's

Thank you for the tip on removing the switch!

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 02:25 am
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Dustin Lee
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Noah Britt wrote: Yes, that is a bearing. It is not a ball bearing, however, so there are no inner and outer races. I think they're called sleeve bearings, so it works just by utilizing the smooth surfaces of the bearing and the shaft with oil in between.

Thank you for the information, I should mask this off for sand-blasting then correct?

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 11:39 am
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Tom Lefaivre
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Stick a piece of rag in the bronze bushing to protect the inner surface and don't directly aim at it. When assembling, you can soak it in machine oil to create the film. 
Your oscillating connecting arm can be cleaned with a solvent.

 The stator windings can be cleaned with electrical contact cleaner. I would recommend re-spraying with winding/motor insulating varnish to protect them. The switch coil on the base can be cleaned and insulated the same way -
 https://www.tenaquip.com/product/sprayon-el600-clear-insulating-varnish-c00600000-aa178 

Last edited on Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 11:42 am by Tom Lefaivre

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 Posted: Fri Apr 2nd, 2021 05:34 pm
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Dustin Lee
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Thank you for the helpful information Tom!

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 Posted: Sat Apr 3rd, 2021 03:50 pm
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Dustin Lee
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Any tips on how to get this unstuck?

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 Posted: Sat Apr 3rd, 2021 06:17 pm
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Tom Lefaivre
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The knurled nut is holding the switch body in the base of the fan. Put a rag over it so you don't damage the tag and then squeeze it with needle nose locking pliers (or tightly with regular needle nose), then turn off. 

Last edited on Sat Apr 3rd, 2021 06:18 pm by Tom Lefaivre

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 Posted: Thu Apr 8th, 2021 07:11 pm
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Dustin Lee
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I've been making progress, but have come up on some new questions:
The first is what should I do with the "pad" behind these screws here, It appears to be saturated with old, tarry grease. Should I remove it and soak it in degreaser to try to get the old gunky grease out?




---

My second question is, how do I remove these rubber feet - or should I?

I fear damaging them or being unable top replace them, but I also know there's rusty edges hiding under them.






---

Lastly (for now) - a similar question: removal of this grommet? Any tips to reduce damaging it, and if they're easy to replace where should I look?

Same for the second one here.




Mostly wondering if I should replace the second and where to buy one.

---

Again thanks to everyone who's been sharing their experience and expertise, I'm very much enjoying this process!


Last edited on Thu Apr 8th, 2021 07:34 pm by Dustin Lee

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 Posted: Thu Apr 8th, 2021 07:28 pm
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Noah Britt
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As for the two grommets, they already look pretty damaged (especially the second one), so I wouldn't worry about tearing them up. New grommets are readily available on eBay.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/180-pc-Rubber-Grommet-Assortment-Kit-Set-Firewall-Hole-Electrical-Wiring-Gasket


For the rubber feet, I guess I would try removing one by hand, and if you can get it out that way without damage, then remove the rest. If it starts crumbling or something when you try to remove it, I'd just leave them there and work around them. You'll want to push them through from this side (in picture below) to the other side; not vice versa. Even if they do crumble, there are probably rubber grommets out there that would work as replacements; they would just have holes in them.


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