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Missing Link Found in Saint Louis  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 08:53 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Dentist testimonial from my previous post of a 92 book dated for May.
 
 
 
Kind of hard to dispute a Meston tripod was on the market in 92. 
 
Like I said...I tried like h ell and couldn't find even a peep about an improved cone base Meston fan motor in 92.   

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Last edited on Tue Jul 29th, 2014 08:54 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 09:08 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Right around the time of Alex Meston's death in late spring/early summer of 93 it appears Emerson started shipping Meston motors to Europe.  Check out the variations for the use of the Meston motor.

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Last edited on Tue Jul 29th, 2014 09:12 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 09:09 am
   
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 09:48 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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From two posts up:

"We may say that the novel feature of the Meston motor is that is has no wire at all on the armature, and this little motor being of the self-regulating type, with carbon revolving brushes…"

Russ, I would love to see you find some mention of the 1895 Emerson Induction motor with back switch and no carbon brushes in one of the early publications that either links it to being a Meston or shows no link to the back switch being a Meston.   I know that the motor has MESTON cast into the front cover but that alone does not necessarily mean that Emerson themselves considered it to be a variety of Meston motor.  Most collectors seem to include the back switch version to be a Meston but I do not which is confined by the 1896 and 1898 Emerson catalogs as I outlined early in this thread.  Can you find anything that confirms one view or the other?

Last edited on Tue Jul 29th, 2014 09:49 am by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 02:31 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Beautiful work, Russ!
 
I concurr with every word you have posted and could post thousands more just from the 1892 and 1893 catalogs.
 
Of course the tripod was being manufactured, and sold in 1892, as we know from so many sources and agreed to long ago, BUT it is still first advertised by THEM in the 1893 catalogue..
 
It is so tempting to release my 1891 cut of the round base Meston, and the entire 1892 catalog, with the changes from 1891 of that first model. 
 
Everyone who sees both is having a good laugh about all of this.
 
Thanks again and keep up the good work! 

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 04:22 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Beautiful work, Russ! 
 
It is so tempting to release my 1891 cut of the round base Meston, and the entire 1892 catalog, with the changes from 1891 of that first model. 

 
Bill Hoehn wrote:
Russ,
 
You are correct on the 1891 round base Meston. It was 11 inches in diameter, and 52 volts only, and had no model # since it was the only one.
 
The 1892 models--round base---(as in the 1892 catalog-Page 60) were:
 
No.2001 for 52 volts, 1.8 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
and the No. 2002 for 104 volts, .9 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
For 1892 "They are now improved and perfected and we guarantee them in every respect."
 
There is NO tripod in Emerson's 1892 catalog. It IS in the 1893 Catalog. 
 
 
Bill, I am not challenging you that your 92 catalogue sports improved cone base Mestons.  Notice there is no mention of variable speed on either cone base Meston models #2001 and #2002.  Is there SPECIFIC mention in your 92 catalogue of the cone base model changes, such as variable speed? What I do know is I can find NOTHING in the 92 books to support the improved cone base ever went to market in 92.  I can find EVERYTHING to support the Tripod went to market in 92.  Alex may of had full intention of introducing improved cone base Meston models for the 92 season.  But it is my distinct IMPRESSION they never went to market.  If so,  this would support the strong possibility catalogues are not gospel.  However, your 92 catalogue shared something Emerson may of had good intention to follow though with to market, and dismissed despite the printing and issue of the catalogue. Think about it.

Last edited on Tue Jul 29th, 2014 04:56 pm by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 04:44 pm
   
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Fred Berry
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I like the Meston fan with the OSHA cage...

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 Posted: Tue Jul 29th, 2014 11:11 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Hi Fred,


Just as OSHA was forced to rescind there rule that all ceiling fans also have approved guards with a maximum 1/2 inch opening, they fouled up on the Meston close guard.


With present examination I find the only part of that guard that they would approve, is the part 2 inches from the center ring, which measures 1 & 3/4 inches in diameter.


From there out, including the outer edge and the entire open back, this cage therefore fails to meet the OSHA demands!

How about a recall? :)

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 12:14 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ,

I feel sure all of the cone base Mestons were single speed. The 1891 cut shows "2,500 revolutions per minute."
The 1892 shows both the No.2001 & 2002 as "2200 revs".

I see I didn't mention the 1891 version's speed before.
You're making me be more careful, with your attention to detail and minutia, which I've never found that important in fans. Medicine-yes, fans-no.

"IVS" is a term I coined many years ago for Jim's first serial number survey of Emersons, to differentiate it from the hanging switch model Mestons..

The 1893 catalog has two typed pages describing the "'1893 MODEL.'
EXTERNAL APPEARANCE AND GENERAL CONSTRUCTION....
OUR REGULATING AND REVERSING DEVISE is another feature only possessed by our motor, and is invaluable. The speed of the Fan can be regulated at will by shifting the regulator stud projecting through slot in front cover. The motor can also be reversed by shifting the stud to opposite side of slot. Any desired speed may be obtained, and quantity of current will be regulated accordingly.
THE ARMATURE....
THE COMMUTATOR....
THE BRUSHES AND BRUSH HOLDERS....
SELF-OILING BEARINGS....
THE FAN.-We have this year made an important improvement in fans. It has hitherto been the practice to make light Fan Hubs of brass, which is easily bent out of shape, which will cause the Fan to run out of balance, making a disagreeable, jarring sound and shaking the entire motor. We make a Fan Hub of such material that it will be practically impossible to bend it out of shape or get it out of balance. We believe this improvement will be greatly appreciated."


I know of no other Emerson 1892 catalog other than "our First Annual Catalogue" which I described before. Later I remember often seeing (paraphrasing)---send for our current fan catalog. Did they have one in 1892? I don't think so, but maybe.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 03:52 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: I know of no other Emerson 1892 catalog other than "our First Annual Catalogue" which I described before. Later I remember often seeing (paraphrasing)---send for our current fan catalog. Did they have one in 1892? I don't think so, but maybe.
The Emerson Electric Mfg. Co., Manufacturers of Electric Lighting and
Railway Specialties and Alternating Current Motors: Illustrated Catalogue
 
 
Emerson Electric Manufacturing Company, 1892 - 78 pages
 

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Emerson_Electric_Mfg_Co_Manufacturer.html?id=j4CGtgAACAAJ

Last edited on Wed Jul 30th, 2014 05:14 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 03:55 am
   
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Jeff Whitfield
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Might this be the fastest thread to reach 10,000 hits?... Only a few hundred away. 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 03:59 am
   
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John Trier
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Sometimes I feel like I don't belong in a tread like this so I sent Bill a pm question concerning his mission link and the cage adapter ring and the blade.   Also decoration found on Meston's and tripods.  Bill has been wonderful in answering my questions and we swapped quite a few fan stories.   Bill suggested that I post some highlights of our exchanges, and toward the end I was thinking the same thing.  conclusion ....... Bill's Meston is an "old reliable"  the cast cage ring was used to adapt to the current knock down cage offered in the day, but the blade is still a mystery to me.   Not original to the fan, I think.   

Hi Bill, I am still loving this thread and your comments. Question: ……..  Not posting this because I’m afraid I’ll sound like an idiot.   The blade posted on #55 confuses me.   Is this the blade found on the missing link you found and how does it attach to a shaft since it looks more or less like an oscillator blade to a later fan?    Then ….the cast  cage ring, I’ve thought of it before.   Was it simply an improved way of attaching a cage to the Meston?  A later Meston.    No struts to spin around, no way for the cage to become distorted or twisted from use.   As I see it, it locks down the cage in the proper position?   Was it meant to solve a problem?   Or for cost savings, a customer who wants a cage could buy the cheaper “knock down” cage as opposed to the more elaborate cage shown in #50.   This would be evidence of the very first signs of a product degrading due to cost concerns.  Also, I noticed that the cast cage ring holes are threaded?   What does that mean?    Also one more question: ………  The decoration on the base of the tripod.   The earlier models have the more simple flowers painted on the base as in the 93 Meston (as mine did), but later ones have the more intricate (decal???) as shown in the 51st post.   How do these decoration details fit into the dating a Meston?  Is there a "93 top switch" Meston found with the later decoration?   Keek up the great work.    John

Hello again John,Hope to stick with this now.  55 is the blade on my new Meston. The picture is poor and doesn't show the important differences. The tip is a hemisphere about 3/4 " diameter, but it is pierced by a 5/16 " hole for the Meston shaft. A standard fillister head machine screw holds it in place. The parker blade has the usual stamps of Sept.12-1899. It was obviously produced later than the fan--but for what? I checked all Emersons both AC and DC and all Trojans, and did not find this blade on anything else. Still a mystery.The cast cage ring #s 56 & 57 is apparently the first one found. The Meston cages (open & closed) had their own three screw attachment of the cast struts near the center which matches the three not threaded holes in the "adapter ring". The outer eight threaded holes are identical to the eight holes on the front of (later) Emerson tripods (to which the cage fits). When I got it, the later knock down cage was attached with the eight cage wires wrapped the same way as on the tripods (counter-clockwise instead of the more natural clockwise to help with the tightening). I explained, earlier, my theory for this. The ring appears to be cast brass, nickel plated. Why not polished? It's quite conspicuous when mounted and used.#s 50 & 51 are the same Meston front and rear. As per the decorations--a lot of thoughts. No evidence of decals or transfers. No two are identical. I assume there were several artists painting them. Even if it were just one artist, they would still vary. My Mestons, two of which have remarkable original finish have the silver painted centers, which I nick-named "partridges in a pear tree". The legs have gold dots on top getting smaller as the leg decreases in size, gold stripes on both sides of the legs, and triple gold slashes on the tip of each leg. I believe this is the usual for Mestons, and my commissioned artist made a metal template to duplicate the center "partridge----".With the Emerson tripods the center scene appears as a few growing flowers. I see a lot of varieties, but all decoration is in gold---no silver. The legs appear unchanged but the amount of decoration decreases with each year until there is none. Hope this is reasonably clear,Bill

Hi Bill ...... Enjoyed all your messages today.       You did clear up some confusion but still a little foggy on the blade.   The knock down cage.  Pictured in my tripod (link).    So you could get the "old reliable" and it would come with your cast cage ring and my steal knock down cage offered in 1899 and it would fit.    Am I right?   I love this tread.   Hope you're having fun with it.   The decoration on my tripod was introduced in what year do you suppose? Best regards    John
I also remember a fan gathering John Witt held some 20 years ago in St. Louis.   A local approached the gathering and said he had a fan in the car.   John was able to acquire a great Meston with original blade and cage.   At one time I had a picture of it, but no more, and now wonder what it was???

Last edited on Wed Jul 30th, 2014 04:03 am by John Trier

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 04:05 am
   
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 06:50 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Steve Stephens wrote: Russ, I would love to see you find some mention of the 1895 Emerson Induction motor with back switch and no carbon brushes in one of the early publications that either links it to being a Meston or shows no link to the back switch being a Meston.   I know that the motor has MESTON cast into the front cover but that alone does not necessarily mean that Emerson themselves considered it to be a variety of Meston motor.  Most collectors seem to include the back switch version to be a Meston but I do not which is confined by the 1896 and 1898 Emerson catalogs as I outlined early in this thread.  Can you find anything that confirms one view or the other?

Read the title of the June 12, 1895 article.  "MESTON MOTORS"  The induction motor is mentioned in the same article entitled "Meston Motors".  That is a heads up that a Meston is a Meston.  Alexander Meston designed the d amn fan from a cosmetic standpoint.  A Meston was a Meston, until it didn't look like a Meston anymore. If there are those that wish to pursue pinning down when Emerson made end bell changes and what exactly was embossed in them, go for it with my blessings. There are tag information details worth documenting, etc.. But......the d amn fan as far as I am concerned thanks to Alexander Meston...... is a Meston. Amen.
 
http://books.google.com/books?id=4-dQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA550&dq=emerson+Meston+Induction+fan+motor&hl=en&sa=X&ei=L1PYU_GFFtGQyATvjYG4BQ&ved=0CDsQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=emerson%20Meston%20Induction%20fan%20motor&f=false
 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 07:03 am
   
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Steve Stephens
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"The catalog shows the Emerson Induction fan motor, without commutator, and their other regular types for desk or stand..."


No commutator = "Emerson Induction fan motor"

The fan motor with the commutator is known to be the Meston and I would assume that it is the "other regular type".

Last edited on Wed Jul 30th, 2014 07:04 am by Steve Stephens

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 07:13 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ, I don't understand post 290.
 
I hope this means you were able to find my catalog elsewhere. It surely will simplify this discussion.
 
When Warren and I got into this and he knew I had family and lifelong friends working there he asked if I could get more early records. One of my friends, Barney Brundage, came to Emerson from Lincoln Electric along with Charles Knight, the President  of Emerson at that time. Barney, an engineer, was in Emerson's think tank, and would give me serial number 1 of some of his developed and produced products.
 
Interesting to me, Barney was a genius as was his wife Bobbie and all three of their children---all with perfect testing scores. How often does that happen? Bobbie and my wife, Laverne, were childhood friends along with their paper boy, Roger Penske, and schoolmate Paul Newman. I'm rambling, sorry!
 
Anyway, they welcomed me graciously at the World Headquarters, and let me copy every fan record they could find.  The original catalogs, which I later bought, are in many different sizes and condition. I spent many hours at Office Depot making all one sided 8 1/2 by 11 copies.
 
Anyway, would you please explain to this simple old man what post 290 means?
 
Thanks

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 07:15 am
   
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George Durbin
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Jeff Whitfield wrote: Might this be the fastest thread to reach 10,000 hits?... Only a few hundred away. 
 
hi Jeff!
 
I think its much more important that we get back to the patina thread, Jeff I think you will agree?? I know Steve S. does too!...   ;)
 
 
geo...
 
 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 07:55 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Russ, I don't understand post 290.
 
I hope this means you were able to find my catalog elsewhere. It surely will simplify this discussion.
 
When Warren and I got into this and he knew I had family and lifelong friends working there he asked if I could get more early records. One of my friends, Barney Brundage, came to Emerson from Lincoln Electric along with Charles Knight, the President  of Emerson at that time. Barney, an engineer, was in Emerson's think tank, and would give me serial number 1 of some of his developed and produced products.
 
Interesting to me, Barney was a genius as was his wife Bobbie and all three of their children---all with perfect testing scores. How often does that happen? Bobbie and my wife, Laverne, were childhood friends along with their paper boy, Roger Penske, and schoolmate Paul Newman. I'm rambling, sorry!
 
Anyway, they welcomed me graciously at the World Headquarters, and let me copy every fan record they could find.  The original catalogs, which I later bought, are in many different sizes and condition. I spent many hours at Office Depot making all one sided 8 1/2 by 11 copies.
 
Anyway, would you please explain to this simple old man what post 290 means?
 
Thanks
 
For starters, you are not simple as you claim in your post.  As far as feeling old, I have you beat today, as I had to be put under for surgery....today. But I post comfortable, or in pain.   Sometimes a man has to buck up for the fan forum. .
 
If the title of the 1892 Emerson catalogue in the book link in post 290 with its 78 pages does not match your 92 catalogue, it appears to be another 92 Emerson catalogue.  The catalogue in the book link cannot be viewed, as the owner of the catalogue in Google did not allow any form of viewing. But the google book link validates it exists.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 08:15 am
   
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Steve Cunningham
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Please keep this string going. So, for 1891, the only Meston fan produced was the conical based. In 1892 Emerson introduced the tripod base, variable speed Meston. Can we agree on this?

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 09:23 am
   
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Jim Kovar
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Russ Huber wrote: The Emerson Electric Mfg. Co., Manufacturers of Electric Lighting and
Railway Specialties and Alternating Current Motors: Illustrated Catalogue
 
 Emerson Electric Manufacturing Company, 1892 - 78 pages
 
http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Emerson_Electric_Mfg_Co_Manufacturer.html?id=j4CGtgAACAAJ

There is an original copy of the catalog cited
in the above link, at the Missouri History
Museum Library and Research Center.



Library and Research Center
Located across from Forest Park on Skinker
225 South Skinker Blvd
St. Louis, MO 63112
Phone: (314) 746-4500

Hours

Tuesday thru Friday: 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Saturday: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 09:29 am
   
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Steve Cunningham
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Is it possible to make a copy?

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 09:32 am
   
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Jim Kovar
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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 09:45 am
   
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Jim Kovar
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Is it possible to make a copy?
I would assume?

If photo-copies or flat bed scanner scans
aren't allowed, maybe photographs?  :wondering:

Wish I had known of the catalog when I
was in St. Louis, just recently.  :hammer:

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 02:38 pm
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ,
 
I hope your surgery went well and was not serious. You are in my prayers. Live long enough and I believe 100 % of us will end up with cancer. Later today I hope to pass on part of the obituary of a good friend who wrote his own. Humorous, of course.
 
 Jim,
 
Sorry you and Bill didn't stop in St. Louis, as planned. I was looking forward to our visit.  
 
All,
 
That catalog is one and the same. I have spent many hours there researching the fan history and it's founders, and forgot that I have donated thousands of pages that they didn't have, to them. The staff has always been very cooperative and has always shared and received copies graciously.
 
 Steve C.,  
 
Yes, I agree, but remember the new cone base models are in this catalog, and the tripod is not. The tripod first shows up in Emerson catalogs in 1893, as stated before.

Last edited on Wed Jul 30th, 2014 02:46 pm by Bill Hoehn

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 05:21 pm
   
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Russ Huber
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Please keep this string going. So, for 1891, the only Meston fan produced was the conical based. In 1892 Emerson introduced the tripod base, variable speed Meston. Can we agree on this?


Thanks for the surgery concerns. I am at this time ok, restricted, but mobile.
 
There is no doubt the tripod was on the market in 92.  The Electrical Appliance Company(Chicago Emerson Agency) boasts receiving it in their fan motor line. A dentist testimonial raves about it in a 92 dental book. Numerous 92 credible electrical books support the variable speed tripod base brushed AC Meston fan motor.
 
Bill is adamant in his 92 catalogue the conical base Meston is shown as 2 models at 52 and 104 volts as a one speed fan capable of 2200 revs. I have found "0" evidence so far in Google electrical books to support the conical base improved Meston to have been placed on the market. This however does not conclude the improved conical base Meston never reached the market. If it is displayed in Bill's catalogue, then the fan cannot be ruled out without documentation expressing the fan was dismissed for the 92 season. Thus, the improved conical base Meston fan motors can be only expressed at this time as a possibility for the 92 fan motor season.
 
As the Dunaway made clear years ago....."NEVER SAY NEVER". 
 
 

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 05:41 pm
   
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Steven Gilmore
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Russ, I hope you are doing well and recover quickly. Keep up the thread as we are all interested in learning and love seeing debates.

You guys are Master Debaters of Fans ;)

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 11:21 pm
   
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Ron Jeter
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Has anyone come across production numbers for Meston during the 92, 93, 94 years. Thanks

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 Posted: Wed Jul 30th, 2014 11:34 pm
   
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Steve Cunningham
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Okay. We know the cone base Meston came out in two models in 1891. There were two models, so I think it was 52 and 104V.  In 1892, the Tripod Meston was introduced. How many models? Wre they all 12", or did Emerson produce a 16" Meston in 1892?

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 12:07 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Steve Cunningham wrote: Okay. We know the cone base Meston came out in two models in 1891. There were two models, so I think it was 52 and 104V.  In 1892, the Tripod Meston was introduced. How many models? Wre they all 12", or did Emerson produce a 16" Meston in 1892?
Only one Meston in 1891 with a 11" diameter blade for 52 VAC at 2500 revs.  Tripod for sure in 92.
 
Bill states he has two Emerson cone base models in his 92 catalogue for 52(model #2001) and 104 volts(model #2002), both single speed models 2200 revs.  I can't find any evidence in any of the electrical books so far to prove they ever hit the market. 
 
 

Last edited on Thu Jul 31st, 2014 01:55 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 12:11 am
   
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Russ Huber
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02 article on the development of small ac motors written by Emerson's Herbert Finch.
 
http://books.google.com/books?id=vJRVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA342-IA2&dq=Emerson+meston+induction+fan+motor&hl=en&sa=X&ei=0EPZU5TGC4WNyAScpYHYAw&ved=0CFMQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Emerson%20meston%20induction%20fan%20motor&f=false 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 04:11 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ,
 I hope you get the 1892 catalog soon.
 
I studied it again and hadn't paid much attention to the  dental motor, the sewing machine motor, the jewelers lathes, and others. These were all the IVS Meston motor which shows up as a tripod fan in 1893.
 
Also noted on the 1/8 horse power cone base 1892 fan cuts (single speed) this note at the bottom.
"Note:---We have in course of construction larger sizes, and will issue a special circular in the near future."  I wonder what those are and if that circular has survived. I do not have it.
 
Ron,
No one at Emerson has ever been able to produce production numbers for any year and the old timers tell me they never kept them. That is one reason why your work is so important. The nearest thing we have is first and last serial numbers (when they used them) for the various types and can estimate numbers produced based on the years of production.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 04:54 am
   
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Russ Huber
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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 04:55 am
   
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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 04:59 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bottom Sept. 91 Emerson article under BUSINESS in the book link.  Alexander was already working on variable speed with sewing machine motors. Notice in the article of 91 they are so busy they have an order from Panama. 
 
http://books.google.com/books?id=8Mk1AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA156&dq=Meston+sewing+++1891&hl=en&sa=X&ei=AJLZU-zLFpKzyATz-oAg&ved=0CEkQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Meston%20sewing%20%20%201891&f=false

Last edited on Thu Jul 31st, 2014 05:04 am by Russ Huber

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 05:27 am
   
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Russ Huber
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With variable speed Meston dental and sewing machine motors being worked on and improved in the fall of 91, why follow through with placing on the market for 92 single speed cone base fan motors?

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 05:35 am
   
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Steve Cunningham
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It's my guess The IVS Tripod worked out very well, and it replaced the conical base. But Emerson kept the 91 model in the catalog to sell the inventory.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 06:23 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Thanks Steve,
Makes perfect sense to me!

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 06:45 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Steve Cunningham wrote:  But Emerson kept the 91 model in the catalog to sell the inventory.
One problem with that.  The cone based Mestons in Bill's 92 catalogue were offered in two IMPROVED single speed models. Emerson was on to the variable speed Meston motor prior to the end of the 91 season. My impression is Emerson dropped the improved single speed cone base Meston fan motors(#2001 and 2002) prior to production. The Tripod offered much more for strong sales for the 92 season. 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 08:00 am
   
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Bill Hoehn
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Russ,
The '91 and '92 cuts I have are identical in appearance, and they are back views. I've never seen a detailed other view. Have you?
Never having seen one I have no idea of the tag placement or contents. Do you or anyone else? Probably no Emerson Electric on them.
They may be one and the same, except for the internals---windings? I'm still planning on finding the first one! Ever optimistic! 

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 Posted: Thu Jul 31st, 2014 08:27 am
   
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Russ Huber
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Bill Hoehn wrote: Russ,
 
You are correct on the 1891 round base Meston. It was 11 inches in diameter, and 52 volts only, and had no model # since it was the only one.
 
The 1892 models--round base---(as in the 1892 catalog-Page 60) were:
 
No.2001 for 52 volts, 1.8 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
and the No. 2002 for 104 volts, .9 amperes, 2200 revs;
 
For 1892 "They are now improved and perfected and we guarantee them in every respect."
 


The 91 model was 52 volts at 2500 revs. They may of shared a similar appearance, but the 91 model did not share the same characteristics as the 92 models you posted from your 92 catalogue, other than being only a single speed model, and the 91 sharing 52 VAC with one of the 92 models. 
 
So, either Emerson made the IMPROVED cones bases for the 92 season in your 92 catalogue, or, they did not make them.  Being there is nothing to support the IMPROVED cone base existence for the 92 season in the electrical books, there is a high probability Emerson never manufactured them. As stated previously, the Tripod had much more to offer for the 92 season.
 

Last edited on Thu Jul 31st, 2014 08:39 am by Russ Huber

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