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AFCA Forums > Antique Fan Collectors Association > Post-1950 (Vintage) > New here; Westinghouse trouble, Stan.....my response

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 Posted: Fri Oct 1st, 2021 08:22 pm
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DennisThompson
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I registered and posted what is repeated below.  Stan suggested photos;  good idea.  My registration disappeared today, and I can't reply to Stan, so am beginning over.  I'll try to attach photos, though not good at such things.  I'd really appreciate some tips as what to do to get this fan running again.  I'll be happy to consider paid membership here, however, it is very early to consider that not even knowing how all this works yet.  "[highlight= rgb(254, 252, 246); font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 11px;]Happy to find you all.  I'm sure the reason for my entrance here has been repeated a thousand times.....  My wife has a beautiful Westinghouse floor fan.. She used it this summer.  I was gone one day, and when I came home she said, "my fan QUIT!"  (She loves old things, and in our present 1920's farmhouse, our kitchen range is a 1948 Hotpoint.  Previous 93 yo owner told us, "when REA brought power to the farm, we bought this in 1948)  Works just fine.  Hence,  .... we both love this old fan.  
So here I am.  The blades are stiff to rotate.  Like the bearings suddenly went dry.  I don't remember them being that way.  Turn on and off:  NO sign of life.  NO buzz, click, smoke, smell, - not hot.  Just died.Tonight I pulled the rear cover off and my Triplet meter shows 110V on the two solder points in the fan head.  So I have power.  This fan is in very good condition otherwise; paint good; screw heads do not show signs of ever being removed; blades perfect; blade cage perfect.  Identification marks are:  Style:  LXM 51448.  Cat. No. 10 PMP.  Serial  "AR"  All stamped on the unit.  Oscillating floor model.  So I have set out to attempt to repair/restore this to good operating condition.  I have NO idea when this was made, so I could even be in the wrong forum.  I suspect how, "far," I go now into the, "vintage fan world," will largely depend on the success of this first project.   I admit to having a life long disease of loving most every rusty piece of mechanical history I come across.  Hopeless.I'd like to find an exploded view of this unit.  My worry is that a winding in the motor has gone open.  That could be a real problem.   Any tips or directions would be appreciated.  

Attached Image (viewed 160 times):

Fan 2.JPG

Last edited on Fri Oct 1st, 2021 08:24 pm by

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 Posted: Fri Oct 1st, 2021 08:25 pm
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DennisThompson
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Evidently only one photo is allowed. I'll try the second as new topic, "Westinghouse Fan 2"

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 Posted: Sun Oct 3rd, 2021 02:23 pm
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David Allen
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Hi Dennis. Sorry you've had such problems with your forum posts.  The AFCA has just commissioned a brand-new forum which is much easier to use It's located at https://new.afcaforum.com/index.php
As for your Westinghouse fan.....  It is actually quite likely that the bearings did fail suddenly. Often the oil will become gummy and sticky over time. The oil will continue to lubricate as long as there is a film remaining on the bearings and shaft, but it is too gummy to flow through the oil wicks and pores in the bearings. 

There comes a point where the oil film suddenly is lost, and the bearings suddenly get very tight. You may be able to disassemble the fan, clean the shaft, and get oil back into the bearings where they will function again. Normally when this happens, you will need to use heat to remove the gummed oil from the bearings in order to make room for new oil. But, sometimes they will continue to work with additional oil added to what is still remaining.

It's possible that the stalled condition has caused the motor winding to burn out; however you mention that there wasn't any unusual smell from the motor nor any signs of smoke damage. So I would expect this didn't happen. To see if the fan is still electrically "good" you need to use your meter at the power cord plug. Unplug it from power, and test for resistance between the two plug terminals. You should see a reading in the "ohms" range.  It should be less than 100 ohms between the two terminals. This would be with the fan switch in the ON position. If you see a higher resistance, in the thousands or millions of ohms - then you'll have to search for the electrical open circuit in the system. 

Hope this gives you some starting points to check! 

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